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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thirty Scary Tales
**Gifted to me by the author in exchange for an honest review**

I originally didn't know what to say for this review when I first finished the book. I enjoyed it, I just didn't know how to word what I wanted to say, but here goes:

When I settled down to read this book, I was a little apprehensive as I am not a horror fan. I'm not really fond of blood...
Published 14 months ago by D'eBook Sharing

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 30 Tales of Varying Degrees of Disturbance
This is a well-written collection and a couple of the stories - 'By Your Own Free Will' and 'The Bridge Chamber' - were disturbing enough to stay echoing in my mind for hours afterwards.

Disturbing - that is the word.

If this book had been called '30 Disturbing Tales' it could have got a 5-star rating from me. I can't say more than two of the...
Published 14 months ago by Mitz


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thirty Scary Tales, 13 Oct 2013
This review is from: Thirty Scary Tales (Illustrated): Horror Stories (Kindle Edition)
**Gifted to me by the author in exchange for an honest review**

I originally didn't know what to say for this review when I first finished the book. I enjoyed it, I just didn't know how to word what I wanted to say, but here goes:

When I settled down to read this book, I was a little apprehensive as I am not a horror fan. I'm not really fond of blood and guts and gore and I am fairly squeamish - I close my eyes at the bloody bits when I am watching "Bones" on TV LOL. Regardless, I started to read.

My original rating for this book was going to be a four star one because I wasn't scared by any of the stories. I was able to read them without flinching, which disappointed me. I was expecting to find myself squealing in disgust or horror or something.
I changed my mind when I scared the bejeepers out of myself out by recalling one of the stories - "The Devil You Know" - whilst using an empty, unlit, public toilet one night about a week after I read the book.
My hubby was waiting outside on some benches so rationally I knew I was safe. However, whilst sitting on the toilet, my mind wandered and I started recalling this particular story. Remembering how "Lucie" felt whilst she tried to sleep on a bench on an empty train station platform, I found myself peering around and checking the top of the stall to make sure no eyes were watching me. I didn't feel at ease until I had hubby back in view and those public toilets were well behind us LOL.
That is what makes a scary tale good and that is why I gave the book a five star rating.
To me, if a scary, creepy story which I didn't really get creeped out at while I was reading the book, comes back and bites me in the ass, it deserves a high rating.

Each story was well written, each character brought to life. Each tale is as creepy as the one before it. None of the stories were boring. I read each and every one and like another reviewer said, I was also pleasantly surprised by the little notes at the end of each tale. Especially when I knew most of the locations as I live within an hour's travel of them. Each tale was like a 5 minute movie and not a crappy 5 minute movie either.

Is this book worth reading? Yes it is. It may not be bloody and gory etc but it is creepy enough to lodge itself into your sub-conscience and jump out and shout BOO!! when you least expect it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 30 Tales of Varying Degrees of Disturbance, 26 Oct 2013
This review is from: Thirty Scary Tales (Paperback)
This is a well-written collection and a couple of the stories - 'By Your Own Free Will' and 'The Bridge Chamber' - were disturbing enough to stay echoing in my mind for hours afterwards.

Disturbing - that is the word.

If this book had been called '30 Disturbing Tales' it could have got a 5-star rating from me. I can't say more than two of the stories actually came close to scaring me. It's polite horror. Don't get me wrong, I am no fan of gore, torture-porn or similar hard-core horror, but the stories in this book seemed to stop too far short of visceral to be really scary. it doesn't evoke that feeling of 'other', that atavistic feeling that makes you afraid to read it alone at night.

So, expect to be disturbed rather than scared and you'll have a wonderful read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant collection, 17 Oct 2014
By 
G. Keogh (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Thirty Scary Tales (Illustrated): Horror Stories (Kindle Edition)
I love short story collections and this is one of the best I have found on Amazon. As other reviewers have pointed out (and as the author herself indicates) this isn't gory, obvious horror but is more unsettling and disturbing than scary.

I really enjoyed the variety in this collection and I had to double check that they were actually written by one author. Some of the stories were set in the modern day, some in older times, and some in a fantasy world that I understand the author created for a full length novel. Some of them involve the supernatural and others involve horrors from the real world.

In the afterword, the author said she'd like to hear which stories we enjoyed the most and which we weren't so thrilled with, so here's my top:

By Your Own Free Will - A high-flying career woman and MENSA member visits a modern day witch for a love potion, and ends up giving away a crucial part of herself in the quest for love. Although there is very little 'horror' in it, it is one of the most disturbing short stories I've read. It reminded me strongly of another short story, Mr. Pull-Ups by Jack Kilborn, which is far more extreme and gruesome but sticks with me in just the same way.

The Bridge Chamber - A little girl tries to earn the respect of her bullies by taking them to a secret place she has discovered, but things don't quite go to plan. This is one of those stories that drops you right into the scene and has you thinking "good god, what if that was me?".

Seagulls - A young woman moves to the seaside and is constantly aware of a menacing trio of seagulls watching her every move through the window. The author achieved a disturbing feeling of claustrophobia and imprisonment in the very place we should feel safe - home - and it was very effective.

Take Me To St. Roch's - A lone driver picks up a hitchhiker who is stragely uncommunicative and sulky, and the night turns into a nightmare. I loved the black humour in this one.

The Colour of Dishonour - This was set in the author's fantasy world creation and it transported my right there - not easy to do in a short story.

Four Bony Hands - A modern twist on a well-known fairytale. Even though we all know how the story ends, this was very well done and kept me interested.

Double Rainbows - An ill-treated lover gets her revenge in a very clever way.

Which ones didn't I like so much?

Arete and Night Train. They were still well written, it's just that vampires and werewolves don't interest me.

Burning - One of the most disturbing books in the collection, about racism and hatred. Very effectively told through the voice of an innocent, unprejudiced child.
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4.0 out of 5 stars 3.5* Rating, 22 Sep 2014
This review is from: Thirty Scary Tales (Illustrated): Horror Stories (Kindle Edition)
I really enjoyed reading Thirty Scary Tales by Rayne Hall, but I can't help feeling a little bit let down, maybe my expectations were too high I'm not sure, but I definitely didn't find this book scary. Creepy at times yes, but scary not for me. Maybe I've read too much horror and have become desensitised to it? Either way this is still a really good book, that I have enjoyed reading.

Each story has its own variation on a dark theme that are creepy enough to provoke thoughts that can make you glance around the room or over your shoulder.

Rayne Hall has the knack of drawing the reader into the story. Her writing style is really good, the stories all have a good flow and pace to them. Each contained enough information to allow me to create images in my own head. The stories are clear and well thought out.

Overall I enjoyed reading these tales and I think that there will be something in here for everyone. As Rayne says at the start of the book:
"Fear is personal. The same story may constrict one person's chest and set their heart racing, yet send only a mild tingle down another reader's spine." (loc 55 kindle)

This book is a good read and I would definitely recommend giving it a shot. 3.5*
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fear is fun, 19 Sep 2013
This review is from: Thirty Scary Tales (Illustrated): Horror Stories (Kindle Edition)
Entertaining and entrancing read. Rayne Hall is an amazing storyteller.

I read parts of this book while waiting for the dentist, and it's ideal for that. (Perhaps not so good if you already suffer from a fear of dentists). The stories are well-written and captivating so I could really get into them and forget about the lethally dull waiting room. I think they'd be great for train journeys as well.

The stories in this collection are well-written and varied. They have different lengths, different subjects, and different degrees of scariness. Depending on your personal fears, a story from this collection can leave you either a little uneasy, or full of dread.

The author often uses existing places as the settings. This adds realism to the stories and makes them easy to relate to.

A feature I didn't expect but did enjoy was that at the end of each story the author gives some information about how she came to write that particular story, and/or something about its background.

If you are going to make a long journey, or you expect to have to wait a lot (like at the dentist) this is the perfect book to take along!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great set of short stories, 19 Sep 2013
This review is from: Thirty Scary Tales (Illustrated): Horror Stories (Kindle Edition)
As a kid, I loved horror stories. I can remember sitting in fear in my living room watching "Nightmare on Elm Street" and loving every minute. I can't say that I've changed a whole lot since then. I love a good scare now and then and although this book lacked the blood and gore of the stories of my youth, it has it's own brand of fear.

"Thirty Scary Tales" by Rayne Hall is a collection of short stores designed to instill a subtle fear into the reader. The stories aren't your traditional horror stories where violence and gore reign supreme. The author has created stories that appeal to the reader's personal fears.

All to often when I read short stories, I am left wanting more...more details, more character development, just more everything. This wasn't the case with these stories. The author has taken great care to make sure that each story is complete and can stand alone on it's own merit. I love how at the end of each story the author has included a commentary on each story.

There is a story here for everyone. My personal favourite is "Prophetess", which is the story of Cassandra from Greek mythology. When she spurned the love of the god Apollo she was cursed. She can see into the future, and would be compelled to tell the truth but never to be believed. The story focuses on how she uses this "gift" to a dramatic end.

Ms. Hall uses every day language to weave her stories and draw you into a world where your imagination and personal fears can take flight. The ending to each story is not always what you would expect. Ms. Hall has compiled a great collection of stories that are bound to put a little fear into the most fearless reader!

This book isn't for someone who is looking for a horror story that is full of blood and gore, but is more directed at readers who are looking for stories that are more subtle in their horror.

I received one or more of the products mentioned above for free. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Creepy and delightful, 30 Aug 2013
This review is from: Thirty Scary Tales (Illustrated): Horror Stories (Kindle Edition)
Having read several of Rayne Hall's books before I thought I knew what I was getting, but I was wrong. This collection shows how masterful a story teller she is. In all honesty I enjoyed each one, some made me smile, some made me cringe and some got under my skin. As a bonus Rayne explained how each story was conceived, which only added to my enjoyment of the tales.

Three of my favourites :
Each Stone a Life : This tale took us back to the world of Storm Dance (a dark fantasy novel which I throughly enjoyed) and showed us just how cruel one man could be. Just when I thought I knew where the tale was heading I was pleasantly thrown of course.

Turkish Night : Dreams may come true and in this case Rayne takes that idea and turns it on its head with a delightful tale filled with music and dance.

The Colour of Dishonour : Again we are taken back into fantasy and are shown just what can happen when the feelings of guilt take over your life. A cruel man who believes he is worthy of promotion is shown the error of his ways.

If you like to be scared, entertained and amazed then I suggest that you invest in this book, or any other of Rayne Hall's collections.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable dark short stories, 2 Oct 2014
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This review is from: Thirty Scary Tales (Illustrated): Horror Stories (Kindle Edition)
some very good reads in this one I like the variety of topics and different lengths of stories contained. I don't think the stories were particularly gruesome or scary but that's a good thing in my opinion.I would recommend this to anyone that enjoys a quick read and exploration of the darker side of human nature
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4.0 out of 5 stars Disturbing, 6 July 2014
By 
Miss K. Dye "K-L" (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Thirty Scary Tales (Illustrated): Horror Stories (Kindle Edition)
I received this book in exchange for an honest review (LoP or Lovers of Paranormal Goodreads Group)...

Rayne Hall's Thirty Scary Tales are more disturbing than scary. They aren't overtly gory, which is a plus for me as I much prefer horror which plays with your mind rather than makes your stomach churn, and leaves you with a sense of dread.
I really enjoyed reading the stories and as they are short I could read one when I had a spare moment then read another story later. My favourite stories were 'Each Stone, A Life', 'Prophetess' and 'Burning'.
The reason I liked reading these stories so much was due to the slow build-up of unease and dread: in most of the stories I had an idea of how it was going to end but I kept on reading, it's like being stuck on a train where you know there's a bottomless pit at the end of the track but you can't get off. There's lots of different scenarios too so there's bound to be something that will appeal. Some of the stories are set in the Storm Dancer universe, another of Rayne Hall's books, but the stories can be read without having any knowledge of the Storm Dancer universe.

I did think some of the stories ended too abruptly, such as 'The Painted Staircase', while the mish mash of modern and historical stories felt a little muddled. I would have preferred it if there was one section for modern stories and another for historical stories. However, these are my only complaints.

This is a great read on a dark night when you want to feel unsettled
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very good, atmospheric, 28 Jun 2014
By 
M. Robins "MR" (Hampshire) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Thirty Scary Tales (Illustrated): Horror Stories (Kindle Edition)
I really enjoyed these stories, somewhat gothic but contemporary. Not reliant on gore, these stories are classic atmospheric, creepy tales,
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