Customer Reviews


79 Reviews
5 star:
 (58)
4 star:
 (11)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (8)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Justified - in giving it five
Highly recommended - what a great and wondrously different read that was. Many thanks, Mr Higgs. The money burning incident was something that had lodged itself in a dark recess of my mind and popped out every so often for no apparent reason - so I was excited to hear about the existence of Chaos Magic Music Money and hoped to find the truth behind the...
Published on 9 Feb. 2013 by Graham Ellis

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One Star
Scant on KLF information, long on waffle, tangents and balderdash.
Published 4 months ago by Jonathan I R Lanyon


‹ Previous | 1 2 38 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Much more than the KLF, 4 Jan. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book is thankfully much more than a book about the KLF, as writing just about the actions and music of Cauty and Drummond would be a disservice to one of the more interesting bands in pop history.

For some it was their first time seeing The Smiths, for some the Sex Pistols, for me it was having my mind blown by some middle-aged pop-stars wearing horns on Top of the Pops. Like all great music it is rich with culture that for the intrigued leads to a vast array of ideas and concepts. This led to Discordianism, Robert Anton Wilson and a whole panoply of thinkers and dreamers — all stuff that this book touches upon. Enjoy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An epic story, 16 Dec. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book is about the K L F. It is also about art, music magic,chaos, order, giant rabbits, and the number 23. Or it may be about none of the things. The simple act of burning a million pounds in a boat house on the isle of jura sets off a web of events stretching forwards and backwards in time. The author has an infectious enthusiasm for the music and wider artistic creations of the k foundation, and weaves a rich narrative around what may or may not have been unrelated events. Here we have dada and situationism alongside global capitalism and usury. If this sounds like a disjointed mess, it isn't. If truth exists here, then it wears a coat of many colours and a whole host of masks. Read this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not just a book about a band, 25 Dec. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you think the author is going to regurgitate a chronological narrative outlining the rise and fall of the KLF, you're probably going to be in for a shock.

It's a fantastic and often mind bending trip that sheds a different kind of light on the formation of the KLF and the rebellious turmoil that lead to them incinerating one million pounds. Rather than lean on a mish mash of yesterdays NME articles to do this, the author comes in from the other end of the spectrum and starts questioning how a series of events and actions (intended or otherwise) can invoke forces that appear to have their own agenda.

The story of the KLF transforms from one of enigma to one of redemption. Yet it can't be explained without taking a real journey, one that attempts to cleave you from your mental moorings and cast you adrift in the discordian sea.

Even at a basic level, there are so many bizarre events detailed in this yarn that you'll be gripped.

That's my reality and I'm sticking with it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magic. Maybe literally. And maybe not., 12 Jan. 2015
By 
Brilliant stuff. Excellent writing, clear and concise. I think I liked it for exactly the reasons some of the one star reviewers disliked it - the mix of philosophy, magic and counter-cultural history was great fun and also informative. Like the band itself, you don't know quite whether to take it seriously or not.
I think this book itself is caught up in whatever it was that made the KLF so great. I was surprised to see a few ideas I'd had myself - which I thought were wacky, original and a bit too mad to be shared - popping up in here almost exactly as I'd envisaged them. There's nothing that guarantees five stars from me more than a perceived art/magic connection with my deeper psyche which appears to confirm Jung's ideas of the collective unconscious.
I lament the lack of free gift, however. A whistle or some stickers would have been nice.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, 26 Jan. 2014
By 
Syriat - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The KLF: Chaos, Magic and the Band who Burned a Million Pounds (Kindle Edition)
For anyone coming of age in the early nineties music was diverse and there was a real change in the music in those years. However, one look at the pop charts shows that popular music didn't always follow these trends. In 1991 KLF had three of the top 40 selling songs from that year and they were cut from a very different cloth than many of the chart topping acts. They were rebellious and also quite nuts. This book tells their story, focusing mainly on Drummond and not Cauty.

As the author admits towards the end this isn't a bog standard rock biography, the author is trying to mess with your head (in his words). But to understand The KLF its useful to know about Illuminatus (where a lot of the references are in the band). However, this book covers that, Alan Moore, Cabaret Voltaire and Carl Jung amongst others to try and place the band in context. As such there can almost be entire chapters which seem not to tell much new about the band. It does get you thinking though. The book opens and ends with the burning of £1million. There is a lot of information about the band and their prior forms and it takes you through their story. What becomes clear is that this wasn't a band with a plan, it was a band that was intent on committing career suicide at various points of their existence. Fame and fortune became too much, literally for them.

You might not find the answers you want from this book, but you will be far better informed about the KLF and many other things. You may well admire the band at times and at others just hold your head in despair. However, its a fascinating tale.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An enthralling read, difficult to put down, 22 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I've always loved the KLF. They brought a much needed freshness to the music scene. Their main attraction was, of course, that they seemed completely mad and you had no idea (nor, it seems, did they most of the time) what they'd do next. This book captures the spirit and rationale behind the group perfectly, and I was surprised to learn quite a lot of things that I didn't previously know. The author goes into intricate detail about what drove Messrs. Drummond and Cauty, especially the long shadows cast by the "Illuminatus" Trilogy. My only real criticism (hence the loss of one star) is that sometimes he goes too deeply off on a tangent, and it seems to take a long time to get back to the matter of the KLF themselves. It's clearly a work which demanded a huge amount of research, and only exhausted eyes and the lateness of the hour prevented me from devouring it in one go. Any fan of the KLF (and isn't everyone who has a mischievous twinkle in their eye?) should read this book as soon as possible.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A nostalgic and fascinating read, 4 Jan. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A thorough, fascinating, mind-bending account of a band that deserves such scrutiny.

This is a timely reminder that pop music can be surprising, magical and daring, and should even appeal to readers who aren't familiar with the KLF's music, but enjoy an insight into the logic (and often wonderful lack of it) behind subversive artists' works.

Full of sublime flights of fancy that never veer into self-indulgence, philosophical without being preachy or wilfully obscure, this is a hugely enjoyable read, especially for someone like myself who grew up playing KLF records and fascinated by all the bizarre spectacle that accompanied them.

A modern mythological epic.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars stuning, 30 Dec. 2012
reread its that good loved the book transported me back to my youth. not your average read nor for the faint hearted
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This really over-delivers, 22 Oct. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I was keen to read about the KLF, one of my favourite bands from my student days, but this book gave me a lot more than that. John Higgs takes their basic story and creates a weird web that takes in The Wicker Man, Alan Moore, Tammy Wynette, Doctor Who and the fabric of reality and belief. Needless to say, it makes other pretty much all other music books look staid. This might make it sound like a bit of a wide-eyed esoteric tome for the "heads", but the laconic tone makes the whole journey utterly convincing and utterly enjoyable for even down-to-earth sceptics like me. Why can't all books be like this?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Bill Drummond's bio 1980 from 1994 - well-written but slightly imbalanced, 15 Dec. 2013
By 
Mr. Stuart Bruce "DonQuibeats" (Cardiff, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Initially I was put off from this book by the other reviews that said that it flies off at tangents and delves heavily into Discordianism and synchronicity and so forth. I wasn't really interested in that, I was more interested in Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty and the story of their time working together and the insane things they did. Nevertheless I bought it anyway and took my chances.

I'm glad I did- it's a great book. Yes it does jump around a lot, but it never strays all that far from its core, which is essentially a biography of Bill Drummond from the 1980s to mid 1990s, from his first job (which is relevant) through to the burning of a million pounds. The patterns of coincidence are well explained and it is, despite what other reviewers have said, mostly in quite a chronological order (except for the 'tease' of the prologue).

The most interesting aspect for me is that Bill Drummond is portrayed more as a victim than as a hero. Established as an impulsive, coincidence-driven, map-obsessed and whimsical man, this account of The KLF's story shows him as more of a victim of circumstance (or possibly deliberate Discordian intervention- though I don't happen to believe that) than as a master of his own destiny. It's a bit like Danny Wallace's "Yes Man" scenario, where a man strictly follows a particular and unique set of rules through life and ends up in some very unexpected places.

Jimmy Cauty is portrayed as a bit of a bit-part player, which has happened in other accounts of The KLF as well and always seems a bit inaccurate- Cauty is quite clearly an important figure (and a loon) in his own right and more time could've been spent on him.

There's also an incredible and glaring omission - Drummond and Cauty's 1997 reunion as 2K is completely and utterly overlooked throughout the whole book. The discography section at the back utterly fails to mention it, as does the rest of the book, despite the fact 1997 is mentioned for other events- it is even stated that Drummond & Cauty never collaborated musically again after 1992, which simply isn't true! 2K involved Drummond and Cauty re-addressing their KLF mythology (as old men in wheelchairs wearing horns) and to have left it out of the book completely seems like a mistake. The One World Orchestra track they did together for the Help! compilation is completely missed out too. This isn't just fan nitpicking, these are two fairly major musical items being missed.

As music biographies go though, this is both one of the best bands to write out, and one of the best-written ones I've read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 38 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews