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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely superb
Took a couple of weeks to come, as expected. Both transmitter and receiver are included which is everything you need for one-way communication between a pair of Arduinos. Very easy to plumb into an Arduino. I had it working in minutes. Three connections on the transmitter (GND, ATAD and VCC) and you can connect two directly on the breadboard so you only need one jumper...
Published 15 months ago by J. D. Harrop

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good for experiments
These are interesting and certainly worth looking at for experimentation. They work with the limitations described by other reviewers. Adding an arial to the receiver and transmitter helped. As an intial test, I was able to see flakey transmission and reception using a serial board at baud rates between 300 and 1200 baud at close range, less than a metre. With the...
Published 4 months ago by bang51


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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely superb, 19 Jan. 2014
By 
J. D. Harrop "Jon Harrop" (Cambridge, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: 1pcs 433Mhz RF transmitter and receiver kit for Arduino project
Took a couple of weeks to come, as expected. Both transmitter and receiver are included which is everything you need for one-way communication between a pair of Arduinos. Very easy to plumb into an Arduino. I had it working in minutes. Three connections on the transmitter (GND, ATAD and VCC) and you can connect two directly on the breadboard so you only need one jumper. Four connections on the receiver (GND, DATAx2 and VCC) and you only need 3 and can connect VCC directly so you only need two breadboard jumpers. These devices accept a wide range of voltages for VCC so you don't have to burden the Arduino's 5V regulator. Put ATAD on the transmitter HIGH or LOW and the DATA pins on the receiver go (with high probability) HIGH or LOW. It is that easy.

The range is very poor out of the box, just a few cms. However, there are little solder tabs marked ANT where you can add an antenna. I soldered on a right-angle pin I had lying around which immediately improved the range to about 1m. If I put a female-connected wire on each of the transmitter and receiver then I get excellent communication from one corner of my house to the opposite corner (~30m) which I am very happy with.

Superb value for money. Highly recommended.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pretty good, simple to experiment with, but needs work if you want to use it for real, 14 Feb. 2015
This review is from: 1pcs 433Mhz RF transmitter and receiver kit for Arduino project
I got mine elsewhere but it's identical right down to the part number and reversed 'DATA'.

Here are some useful things to know because no documentation supplied. First off, Google for "XY-MK-5V" and you will find tutorials that describe what other people have found out and you can see it in action. Furthermore, it seems to be close enough to a Seeed Studio product that the data sheet and example code for that are worth looking at. More on this in a moment.

Some people complain of chronic lack of range. The standard advice is to solder a 17cm antenna wire to the transmitter.

I am getting a clear signal without adding an antenna over 3m range through two brick walls, both ends powered at 5v. If your range is tiny, there's a problem.

Assuming you wired up your hardware correctly (which is simple to do), I wonder if all the receiver modules come correctly tuned? A sealed variable inductor appears to control reception frequency. The data sheet points to it and says '2.5 round' (I assume it means turns) for 433MHz, and 3.5 for 315MHz. So if that's set badly, you won't get much out of it. I gleaned this from data sheets that are not common and are hard to provide an uncomplicated link to. Search for: "315-433MRFlink.pdf" and "433MHZ RF.pdf"

The hardware lets you send and detect high or low on the data pin. How you encode data with these is up to you. I devised a simple scheme for basic experiments, based on different pulse lengths for 0 and 1 bits, and different start / end markers to introduce and sign off the transmission.

For real use you'd need something more robust, but again Google turns up threads and posts that give pointers. One reason you need to do this is that when the transmitter is not sending, my oscilloscope shows the receiver outputting plenty of random looking noise. I will need program my way round that on the receiving end with filtering and error detection. Also, other signal sources in the vicinity may trick your app into doing things when it shouldn't.

So, yes it works and it is fun to play with. It's also dirt cheap. But if you want it for a real application you need to put some work into making the software robust enough to behave reliably. The ultimate data rate depends on many factors. The page at http://www.romanblack.com/RF/cheapRFmodules.htm suggests up to 1200 baud if you go about it in a simplistic way, considerably higher if you are careful to account for the electrical characteristics of the circuit. It is well worth reading that page in its entirety!

Also note that communication is one-way. If you want two-way comms, two units will be needed and you have to get your software to avoid confusion and collisions. Or buy some other wireless solution with all that stuff already sorted.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Remote Control for Pi and Arduino - Control your Arduino or Pi Via 433Mhz Remote, 26 Dec. 2014
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This review is from: 1pcs 433Mhz RF transmitter and receiver kit for Arduino project
These will work at the level of attention paid to the antennae and timing of the data, these will work with the RFSwitch library for the Arduino and RaspberryPi with any old piece of wire, to use for communications look at a wiki on AM RF Aerials (17cm enamelled wire from an old Inductor to make a Spiral Square loop Transmitter, 30cm enamelled wire coiled round an empty piece of Ballpoint pen for receiver), the antennae are directional in the sense that the best Tx or Rx power will be got from 90 degrees to the plane of the coil. Read the Playground pages on serial comms and the RF Library for advice on timing of data packets........

For the Price they are a MUST have for any Maker Tinkerer...........
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 433Mhz RF transmitter and receiver kit, 24 May 2014
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This review is from: 1pcs 433Mhz RF transmitter and receiver kit for Arduino project
This transmitter/receiver pair are very compact little modules, built on rather thin, but good quality PCBs. The transmitter (square PCB, 3-pin connector) has a through-hole pad marked "ANT" (top right-hand corner) to which a simple 17cm straight wire aerial should be attached. It needs a positive supply (3.5V to 12V) to "VCC" pin, 0V to "GND" pin; 12V should give maximum range. A positive voltage digital signal applied to the "DATA" pin amplitude-modulates the transmitted signal. (Amusingly, the DATA input pin on my PCB was marked "ATAD" - slight problem with the silkscreen artwork?) The receiver (oblong PCB, 4-pin connector) has a similar pad, (bottom left-hand corner) unmarked, adjacent to the coil. This pad needs a similar aerial attached. The receiver needs a +5V supply on "VCC", 0V on "GND". Received digital data, nominally 5V amplitude, is output on either of the "DATA" pins. I have not yet checked the range of this Tx/Rx pair, nor their power consumption. The only slight problem I have detected is that in the absence of transmission, the receiver tends to respond to random noise, and generates spurious output signals. The signal processing software or hardware will need to be designed to reject these signals. These modules represent extraordinarily good value for money, are very simple to operate, and promise to be fun to use.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cheap and easy to set up, 13 May 2014
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This review is from: 1pcs 433Mhz RF transmitter and receiver kit for Arduino project
Good value and very useful for remote control projects using mains radio sockets. Had no problem using it with the RCSwitch Library
for the arduino. Receiver picked up codes no problem, which I then could use for transmitter.Essential to add an aerial to each unit however so can't use it straight out of the packet.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good for experiments, 4 Jan. 2015
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This review is from: 1pcs 433Mhz RF transmitter and receiver kit for Arduino project
These are interesting and certainly worth looking at for experimentation. They work with the limitations described by other reviewers. Adding an arial to the receiver and transmitter helped. As an intial test, I was able to see flakey transmission and reception using a serial board at baud rates between 300 and 1200 baud at close range, less than a metre. With the appropriate software to filter noise this can surely be improved.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars good value for money, 16 Feb. 2014
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This review is from: 1pcs 433Mhz RF transmitter and receiver kit for Arduino project
These are such good value for money and very easy to use. I used them on an arduino project and used the VirtualWire library available from the internet. With a 17cm antenna (single strand or wire) fitted, the signal was transmitted for about 20 m, probably more if required.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Seem to work;ish - no docs at all, 8 Jun. 2014
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This review is from: 1pcs 433Mhz RF transmitter and receiver kit for Arduino project
Well on the plus side these things seem easy to use; the downside is there are no docs at all,
and I'm relying on the other reviews here for the clues!
(Does anyone know where the antenna wire goes on the receiver? Is that the blob next to the coil?)
It looks a pretty wide (~1MHz) bandwidth on my sdr.

Update: There's a subtlety with these guys; most of the AVR libraries use a special protocol rather
than sending simple serial down them.
I couldn't get 9600 baud serial to work, but I did get 1200 baud serial to work, the trick is to
send a 00 byte at the start of what ever you're going to send and keep the messages short.

Some possibly useful pointers:
http://tutorial.cytron.com.my/2012/04/05/low-cost-wireless-uart/
http://www.cytron.com.my/datasheet/WirelessDevice/RF_TX_User%27s_Manual.pdf
http://www.cytron.com.my/datasheet/WirelessDevice/RF_RX_User%27s_Manual.pdf
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars these work and are obviously cheap but when i used ..., 29 Nov. 2014
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This review is from: 1pcs 433Mhz RF transmitter and receiver kit for Arduino project
these work and are obviously cheap but when i used them in two arduino circuits i could barely get a range of 3m using 1/2 or 1/4 whip antennae. you might find a more advanced solution is worthwhile.
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5.0 out of 5 stars However they worked brilliantly. I used the receiver to determine the frequency ..., 12 Mar. 2015
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This review is from: 1pcs 433Mhz RF transmitter and receiver kit for Arduino project
Took ages to arrive 5-6 weeks. Didn't realise they were going to ship from China.
However they worked brilliantly. I used the receiver to determine the frequency of remote controlled power sockets and then programmed my Arduino to transmit those frequencies to switch mains devices on and off.
A much better solution to hard wiring devices into a relay.
Some people mentioned the range was weak and had to solder aerials to them, but mine worked from one end of the house to the other as they were.
Fantastic piece of kit when combined with remote control power sockets.
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