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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A rare in-depth study of the JAAF
This book is presented in four parts.
Firstly, there is a 100 page history of the Japanese Army Air Force (JAAF) from its creation in 1919 to its demise in 1945. This covers the JAAF’s role in the invasion of China, the Nomonhan Incident and of course the Pacific war. Brief descriptions of the major aircraft types are slotted into this history as each aircraft...
Published on 1 Jan 2003 by Howard Mitchell

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as detailed as I would like
I own the companion volume on JNAF units and aces and find that is a far more complete volume than this one. For instance unit information includes details of significant actions whilst the JAAF book lists only bases and types operated. The general sections on various campaigns are also much more thorough than the Army AF book. New Guinea was one of the most important...
Published 15 months ago by John Boy


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A rare in-depth study of the JAAF, 1 Jan 2003
By 
Howard Mitchell (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This book is presented in four parts.
Firstly, there is a 100 page history of the Japanese Army Air Force (JAAF) from its creation in 1919 to its demise in 1945. This covers the JAAF’s role in the invasion of China, the Nomonhan Incident and of course the Pacific war. Brief descriptions of the major aircraft types are slotted into this history as each aircraft was introduced.
Secondly there is an 86 page history covering each Sentai (air unit). This gives brief details on how and where each was formed, a chronological listing of which bases it flew from and when, battle honours and the names of commanding officers and Chutai (flight) leaders where known. An aircraft side-view is shown to illustrate the Sentai’s identification badges (in a few examples these are poorly reproduced).
The third section of 87 pages consists of biographies of 129 individual aces. These range from a few sentences to over a page.
Finally, there is a set of tables listing major combats involving the JAAF, its claims and acknowledged losses (where known) by its opponents, a casualty list listing giving brief details on the fates of over 1,000 pilots killed and a few maps.
Overall the book is very good. There is little sign that it has been translated from Japanese. It is illustrated throughout by black and white photographs and is the most in-depth single volume treatment of the subject I have come across so far. It will appeal to the to someone already interested in the subject rather than the casual reader.
An obvious comparison is with Henry Sakaida’s ‘Japanese Army Air Force Aces 1937-45’ which covers similar ground. This volume goes in to greater detail (129 biographies of aces as opposed to 35 for example) , but Sakaida’s benefits from clearer and larger illustrations and a set of aircraft profiles in colour, and as a paperback it is also cheaper.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as detailed as I would like, 25 Sep 2013
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I own the companion volume on JNAF units and aces and find that is a far more complete volume than this one. For instance unit information includes details of significant actions whilst the JAAF book lists only bases and types operated. The general sections on various campaigns are also much more thorough than the Army AF book. New Guinea was one of the most important campaigns fought by the JAAF but only gets a fairly brief mention. The Navy volume also contains statistics about relative losses and victories for specific days of combat, the JAAF book is far less complete.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Unique History, 11 Feb 2013
By 
P. G. Ward - See all my reviews
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A unique history which isn't available elsewhere of a little known aspect of WW2. Well written by experts in the field.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Of Hayabusas, Hiens and Hayates, and of "Nates" and "Nicks"., 7 Sep 2010
By 
D. P. Broer (LEIDEN, ZH Netherlands) - See all my reviews
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When you have already bought Henry Sakaida's "Japanese Army Air Force Aces, 1937-45" you might wonder whether this book has something to add. The answer is 'Yes'. Compared to Sakaida you will perhaps miss the colour art, but the historical background is much more worked-out. The aircraft modeller might prefer the Sakaida book, but those who want to know more will go for the Hata-Izawa-Shores volume. It offers a concise overview of the history of the fighter units of the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force (IJAAF) between 1931 and 1945, and tells about the Japanese Army Air Force 'Ace' pilots, arranged in alphabetical order. The list of aces on pages 276-280 is more conservative in its credits than the list on pages 88-89 in Sakaida, for reasons explained in both books. Very useful are the appendixes, amongst them the ones listing every major air combats, the casuality lit, the map section and last, but not least: the index. This makes it a very handy to use book while doing research in the bewildering claims of air combat in the Pacific War.
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