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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No matter how hard some mad regime tries to extinguish our spirit and freedom, it will always rise in someone's character
"I Am Malala" Malala Yousafzai is the book about a brave girl in difficult times, a girl who opposed the injustice and almost paid for that with her life.

Inside you'll find her story that starts with the Taliban occupation of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, and all the unpleasant changes that have occurred due to that for women, and especially female...
Published 13 months ago by Denis Vukosav

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Boring
Deeply, deeply boring. It reads an awful lot like the stock ticker lines on cable.
I am of the opinion that people have let their love of the girl overshadow their reasoning abilities when it comes to judging the merits of this book.
Published 2 months ago by Julia


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No matter how hard some mad regime tries to extinguish our spirit and freedom, it will always rise in someone's character, 7 April 2014
"I Am Malala" Malala Yousafzai is the book about a brave girl in difficult times, a girl who opposed the injustice and almost paid for that with her life.

Inside you'll find her story that starts with the Taliban occupation of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, and all the unpleasant changes that have occurred due to that for women, and especially female children.
Malala Yousafzai refused to be quiet, she wanted to go to school, she fought for her education and future.

Unfortunately, one day when she was returning home from school with the bus, she was shot in the head and although it was hard to expect that she'll survive, she didn't only do that, but a lot more.
She recovered, and due to her bravery she become symbol of oppressed women fighting for education and other human rights, she spoke in United Nations and become youngest ever nominee for the Peace Nobel Prize.

Therefore, if you want to read a story about courage, about the impossible that could be achieved, becoming even harder if you are a child, I can fully recommend you to read this book.
It will inspire you and show you that the human spirit cannot be suppressed by any prohibitions, because thanks to him we as human beings have become the only intelligent beings in this world.

And no matter how hard some mad regime tries to extinguish our spirit and freedom, it will always rise in someone's character, as was the case with a young Malala.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the greatest biography ever, 21 Nov. 2014
This review is from: I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and was Shot by the Taliban (Kindle Edition)
this is one of my favourite books ever. it is basically malala's life story and includes a lot of the history of pakistan in it. i would highly recommend it for alk ages - i first read it when i was 10
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gained deeper understanding., 10 Nov. 2014
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An excellent read, gained a lot of insights and some unexpected facts that the western media never reported at the time. Malala is an excellent role model and her story is so important. I bought this version primarily for myself, although I wanted to see if it is suitable for my daughter - it's not. Lots of political history, violence and things she won't "get". Will get the other version for her.
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30 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredible girl, 16 Oct. 2013
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An incredible brave, intelligent and strong willed girl, hard to believe she is only 16, talks about her past in her home town of Swat Valley. An interesting read about how life is like in that part of Pakistan, life under Taliban rule, the endless corruption in all areas of their government and an incredible story about her father. Malala wouldn't be the girl she is today (minus the shooting) without the help of her father and she conveys this a lot in her book. She talks about the freedom of thought and expression he allowed Malala to have even though his first born was a daughter (a girl being born in a Pakistani family is sometimes looked at as 'unlucky' by others whereas when a son is born in to a family there is a big fanfare, congratulations and gifts). It was interesting to read, towards the latter of the book, about the shooting, the conditions of the hospital and the two Doctors from Birmingham who were 2 of many that helped save Malala's life.

It was a great read and certainly made me appreciate how easy we have it here when it comes to School's/College's and how we take that for granted. Its only when something is taken from you that you realise how much it means to you and this is what one of the things Malala talks about in her book. I finished this book within a couple of days. How life was in Pakistan under Taliban rule really gripped me that I couldn't put the book down.

I am glad that she has appeared on numerous talk shows in America and spreading the message of education for all boys and girls as their basic rights in countries, such as Pakistan. I fully recommend this book to young adults/teenagers and maybe they'll realise that they have something incredible in this country where they might not have had this privilege in a third world country to achieve their full potential.
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43 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Story of Courage, Friendship and Faith, 13 Oct. 2013
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This book should be a 'must-read' for everyone! Not only is it a story of courage and inspiration as the first reviewer wrote, it also describes the richness of friendship in a family and among friends of the Yousafzai family. The book is well-written and interesting and I couldn't put it down! The background to events in the Swat Valley is valuable as are the descriptions of ordinary life in Mingora, if you can call it 'ordinary' with the threat of Talibanisation.

Another valuable point of the book is its insights into Islam as it is practised by a devout but not fundamentalist family and their emphasis on prayer. I have always found that prayer unites people of any creed and 'I am Malala' confirmed this opinion, (I write from a Christian perspective). I hope that faith and community uphold the family now in their new home and that they will continue to be ambassadors for Islam as a religion of peace - needed in our multi-cultural society today.

Thank you, Malala, for a wonderful courage and a witness that the pen and the word are far mightier than the sword.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Indictment and Inspiration, 21 Feb. 2015
By 
D. Elliott (Ulverston, Cumbria) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
In 1997 Malala Yousafzai was born in the remote Swat Valley of Pakistan, and by 2013 she had received many accolades and had been featured in Time Magazine as one of ‘The 100 Most Influential People in the World’. A year later she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her commitment to provision of education for females in the face of a Taliban edict banning schooling for girls and imposition of harsh laws restricting women. Purdah was strictly enforced - the cultural and religious practice of requiring women to cover themselves, secluding them by keeping them in their homes, and not allowing anything except when accompanied by family members - and punishment for non-compliance was severe. Demolishing school buildings and murder were only two of a vast array of repressive measures.

The book ‘I Am Malala’ was co-written with Christina Lamb, an award winning foreign correspondent, and it begins with a ‘Prologue’ describing how Malala was shot on her way home from school. Narrative is then divided into parts - ‘Before the Taliban’, ‘The Valley of Death’, ‘Three Girls, Three Bullets’, ‘Between Life and Death’, ‘A Second Life’ and an ‘Epilogue’. The writing is in a simplistic style that somehow adds power to Malala’s message, and she has a clever knack of putting things in a nutshell or reducing them to homilies. As her story progresses it comes across as increasingly real and serious, and it becomes more and more thought-provoking. An eye-opener is realisation of how God loving is Malala when it is religious extremes that she is fighting against.

As a Pashtun originally from Afghanistan Malala gives historical background and she describes how the Swat Valley was taken over by the Taliban with reference to the many complexities involved. She provides detail on political upheavals, military involvement, and dealings with the West, covering a wide spectrum of atrocities from jihadi activities in her own country to drone warfare by the Americans. Insights are provided to family feuds, generational revenge, honour killings and other atrocities that are beyond most readers’ comprehension. Malala does not flinch from her indictment of such issues, but she is inspiring in her advocacy of tolerance and peace. She is acknowledged as a symbolic global figure in the struggle for daughters to be as prized as sons.

‘I Am Malala’ is also her father’s story. As a poor child he dreamt of opening a school providing quality education, but also he was politically motivated and wanted democracy and peace. As a young man he shifted between secularism and socialism on one side, and with militant Islam on the other. In Swat he achieved respect and status, and he encouraged Malala to speak out both locally and in cooperation with the BBC and with foreign journalists. They formed a formidable team and they are inspirational worldwide; yet they still face opposition in their own country.

‘I Am Malala’ ends as she is nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize and on her sixteenth birthday she addresses the UN. Malala states how she doesn’t want to be remembered as ‘the girl who was shot by the Taliban’ but as ‘the girl who fought for education’. This book will ensure her campaign is her legacy, but Malala realises there are still huge difficulties in Pakistan with the nation remaining in turmoil. Readers of ‘I Am Malala’ will have greater understanding of issues faced, and hopefully a greater belief in how individuals can inspire change in the world.
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41 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A True Inspiration, 11 Oct. 2013
This review is from: I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and was Shot by the Taliban (Kindle Edition)
This is not only the incredible story of an amazing young woman but that of her whole family and what life was/is like under the Taliban. It is truly an inspirational account of their courage in standing up for their beliefs in the face of incredible strain and adversity.

Heart-wrenching, thought-provoking and moving, this is a book everyone should read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Extremely thought provoking, 23 Feb. 2015
By 
B. Bampton (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and was Shot by the Taliban (Kindle Edition)
A well written story of a remarkable girl. I saw a TV programme about her in 2013 so knew that she had campaigned before her shooting and that she wasn't just shot at random but what I didn't know was that she came from a small town in the "back of beyond". While it's principally about her early life, how she came to be shot and how she comes to be living in Britain, I particularly enjoyed her descriptions of the Swat District. It's hard to imagine a more different place from central Birmingham. It will be interesting to see whether her high profile is maintained as she grows older. I find myself hoping she won't meet the same fate as Benazir Bhutto.
I wish I'd discovered the glossary before I finished the book!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Boring, 12 Feb. 2015
This review is from: I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and was Shot by the Taliban (Kindle Edition)
Deeply, deeply boring. It reads an awful lot like the stock ticker lines on cable.
I am of the opinion that people have let their love of the girl overshadow their reasoning abilities when it comes to judging the merits of this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A story of a girl, a child who has survived adversity yet remains grateful and humbled by her fate., 22 April 2015
By 
Dr. S. Arif "shahi_1971" (Doncaster, United Kingdom.) - See all my reviews
I am Malala is the story of all little girls who are struggling under the oppression of the Taleban. Having grown up in a country which is synonymous with conflict at every level, it is the jihad of such girls to strive for an education that will not only empower them but also their offspring and will pave the way for an enlightened future hopefully free of the oppressive rhetoric of a hijacked Islam, the very first word was 'to read'. Islam makes it compulsory for both men and women to educate themselves to understand the Koran, exhorting them to travel in order to broaden their knowledge of the world and learn new ways of living. The Taleban attack the very meaning of Islam which empowered women to debate alongside men during the lifetime of the prophet Muhammad. Yes, it may be tedious reading for some who were expecting something more enlightening. But Malala is not a Western girl and this book is her story, not her philosophy on life. However her story informs a philosophy we must all learn from: to strive despite the difficulties life throws at us, to realise hope is more powerful than anything else on this earth. It is hope which enables mankind to survive and drives the determination to succeed against all odds. We have it easier here in the West, yet our ancestors enabled us to reach this far. We owe it to them. We live in a global age where we know about societies different to our own, struggling societies crippled by religious extremism that is bent on reversing what they have achieved and dragging people back to an age that is anachronistic. I have lived in such a society and know how difficult it is for women to empower themselves. Malala didn't ask for fame. She is a girl who has lost her childhood and has taken on a role we wouldn't expect Western children to take on. She survived thanks to the humanitarian efforts of the West, for which she is forever grateful. This is a story of a girl who may never return to her home in the Swat valley of northern Pakistan.
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