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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Expanded Edition
Renegade is one of those albums which is often overlooked (and underrated) but it contains some absolutely classic Lizzy. Although Snowy White was often criticised for his laid-back stage persona, lacking Robbo's aggression or Gary Moore's energy, such criticism is irrelevant on record, where his ability is beyond doubt (if the best of this album and Chinatown had been...
Published 19 months ago by Derek Clacton

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3.0 out of 5 stars One of Lizzy's less loved albums. Messy, a bit here there and everywhere, but still has some of Lizzy's best songs ever!
Although this is collectively one of Thin Lizzy's most inconsistent records full of songs that don't really flow as well as other albums do, it's packed with some truly brilliant tracks!
'Angel Of Death' sounds like a mash-up of Pink Floyd and Iron Maiden before they were really Iron Maiden! The song seamlessly bounces from psychedelic, heavily processed, mellow...
Published 3 months ago by Blew1


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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Expanded Edition, 23 Sept. 2013
This review is from: Renegade (Audio CD)
Renegade is one of those albums which is often overlooked (and underrated) but it contains some absolutely classic Lizzy. Although Snowy White was often criticised for his laid-back stage persona, lacking Robbo's aggression or Gary Moore's energy, such criticism is irrelevant on record, where his ability is beyond doubt (if the best of this album and Chinatown had been on one release, I'm sure it would be regarded as a classic). The album opens typically strongly with the epic "Angel Of Death" - with Darren Wharton's atmospheric lengthy keyboard intro an instant indication of a new dimension to the traditional Lizzy sound until the guitars come crashing in. And with echoes of Jeff Wayne's Musical Version Of War of the Worlds (to which Phil Lynott had contributed with such great effect), it's full of menace. Although also over 6 mins long, the following track "Renegade" (a Lynott/White composition) is in total contrast musically; with its chiming guitars and evocative lyrics, strong on cinematic imagery: surely one of Lizzy's best! It takes until the third track, "The Pressure Will Blow", for the classic Lizzy harmony guitars to really make their presence felt and despite the sheer quality of the first two tracks, the familiarity of the twin guitar sound is more than welcome. "Leave This Town" isn't your typical Lizzy rocker (although it includes a typically clever lyric from Lynott) - it's more of a ZZ Top-style boogie, adding to the sense that the album would have a diverse approach. And perhaps that's where some of the dissatisfaction lies in some quarters - the willingness to take risks pays off in some areas more than others. For instance, "Fats", with its lyric inspired by jazz star Fats Waller, although musically close to "Dancing In The Moonlight ...", might have been more at home on a Philip Lynott solo album. Elsewhere, "Hollywood ..." was certainly a firm favourite with some supporters and album closer "It's Getting Dangerous" has some of Phil's most poignant lyrics.

As for the extras, I always felt that the "Trouble Boys" single was more Rockpile than Thin Lizzy and the b-side "Memory Pain" clearly reflected Snowy's blues background. Having them included here is great for completists, as a record of the time (and brings back memories of the band's somewhat shaky appearance at the Milton Keynes Bowl). The edited single version of "Renegade" and promo single and 12 inch versions of "Hollywood" complete the bonus tracks. It could be that the (unusual) absence of any hit singles accounts more than anything for the poor sales of the album. I reckon if the record company had released "Leave This Town" things might have been different but they seemed to give up supporting the band. More live material recorded at this time was released as b-sides and extras to singles from what would prove, sadly, to be Lizzy's last studio album (Thunder And Lightning) and the Deluxe Edition of that album has those extras. So although Renegade has relatively few bonus tracks compared with the other re-issues, the bargain price might tempt those not yet convinced about this particular line-up. It's one of those albums I don't play as much as others but each time I do I think wow - there's some great stuff on here. Although Lizzy's days would soon be numbered, the Renegade tour was a cracker (certainly to start with) and Phil seemed re-energised; confident enough in the new material to open the show with three unfamiliar songs - a risk which paid off (helped in no small measure by a great stage set complete with the album's red flags and lighting crew in cages above the stage, like ball turret gunners!). Even if it's maybe not a match for Lizzy's absolute best, there are plenty of highs on this album and this remastered Expanded Edition has a well-written and presented booklet - really, you can't go wrong!
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Flawed, but underrated, 25 Sept. 2009
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This review is from: Renegade (Audio CD)
By the time Thin Lizzy recorded this, their eleventh studio album, the cracks in the band were not so much just beginning to appear, but rather to split wide open. Phil Lynott's sad dependency on hard drugs was spiralling out of control, and it can be heard - much of the soulfulness of his voice is gone and in it's place a gravely, strained tone; a shadow of his former self. Guitarist Snowy White appears on his second album with the band after 1980's 'Chinatown' but delivers little to the overall sound. He was, by Lizzy's own admission, more suited to playing blues rock than the driving hard rock of Thin Lizzy, and never really fitted in. They could certainly have used the talents of Gary Moore here. The album also does sound a little over-produced, like so many other hard rock and metal albums of the 80's.

Having said all that, the talents of Lynott and Scott Gorham are still there to be heard in spades and there are some outstanding tracks on the album, not least the melancholy title track 'Renegade' and the spine tingling 'It's Getting Dangerous', two of my very favourite Lizzy songs. There are other good tracks too; from a personal point of view, 'The Pressure Will Blow', 'Hollywood' and 'No One Told Him' are the other standouts.

Lizzy purists always seem to cite 'Renegade' as the bands worst album; they dismiss it out of hand, but I categorically disagree. Maybe it is disliked because there was a new sound emerging, a style dissimilar to the classics 'Jailbreak' and 'Black Rose', albums I love also. However, unlike the previous effort 'Chinatown' and the awful 'Thunder and Lightning', forgettable this is definitely not. It is at times a slightly frustrating effort; it has its ups and downs, but the ups are truly outstanding.

Why is it that this is the Lizzy album, more than any other, that really affects me? I believe its because it is a last hurrah, an album with flashes of pure brilliance, but ultimately flawed, the personification of Lynotts own personal struggles. This is the sound of a band in turmoil, disintegrating, but not going down without a hell of a fight.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rebel, a fool, an underrated album, 2 Jun. 2011
This review is from: Renegade (Audio CD)
Renegade is a very musically diverse album from the borderline metal Angel Of Death with it's eerie keyboard intro solo, to the jazzy track Fats. Some Thin Lizzy classics to come from this album in my opinion include Angel Of Death, Renegade, The Pressure Will Blow, and Hollywood. Those tracks alone should have been enough to gather at least a 3 star review from the "professional critics". If you read the review on AllMusisGuide, you will see a "critic" stating how the title track fails to "tug on the heart strings". That struck me as rather odd, as Renegade was as heavy as Lizzy could get before Thunder and Lightning. If any track on this album is meant to tug on the heart strings, it's It's Getting Dangerous. Here's some lyrics from the song.

"I remember him when we were friends, when we were young, way back then
But now we're all grown up and we're strangers
You see, bit by bit, part by part, we slipped and slipped
Till we'd grown apart and now we're strangers."

This was the second Thin Lizzy album I've ever listened to in full, and loved it. Fats and Mexican Blood are the only real detours if you're looking for straight up hard rock. Fats as I said above, is a jazzy track, with a great flow that is Would have been great on one of Phils solo albums as well as Mexican Blood, a more Spanish sounding ballad then Mexican, but I really don't care as I enjoy the song. Brian Downey, one of rocks most underrated drummers is as solid as ever, and truly shines on Angel of Death and the title track. Give Renegade a few listens and and judge for yourself. Don't listen to critics. Who cares if it's not the classic "Thin Lizzy sound", it's still a great album. 5/5 from me.

If you get this on CD, DO NOT GET THE WOUNDED BIRD REISSUE. Some of the worst crap I've heard in my life. Muddy sound with lost dynamics.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Release that has aged well, 18 Oct. 2013
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This review is from: Renegade (Audio CD)
Renegade has a number of tracks up to standard, "Angel of Death", "Pressure will Blow", "Hollywood" and the title track. It includes interesting stuff like "Fats" and a bit of filler, but this re-issue includes the (rather average) single "Trouble Boys" and its superb moody "B" side "Memory Pain", dominated by Snowy White's guitar solo, which is a major plus.

The influence of Darren Wharton's keyboards can be felt on a couple of tracks, particularly "Angel of Death", which opened the set when the album was toured.

In my opinion it has aged well in comparison to the record that followed it and would surely have benefitted from the "live" BBC in Concert disc recorded on the "Renegade" Tour and for some reason attached to "Thunder & Lightning".

I am a Lizzy fan, so my rating reflects this. Not the greatest LP they did, but solid with a number of high points.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Musical Classic Rock, 22 Jan. 2011
By 
S. Sutcliffe (Sydney Australia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Renegade (Audio CD)
This was always the best sounding Lizzy album on my top end sound system. Renegade shows the band at its most versitile while retaining the riffs. The title track has time and beauty and Pressure is great. Hollywood should have been a hit all around the world. I hope they remix the albums completely in running order, as Lizzy guitarist Scott says "We never had production". Did someone find wild one? Steve
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should have been a big success!!, 12 Feb. 2015
By 
Magnus Rouden "FotoRoddan" (Sweden) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Renegade (Audio CD)
One of the most underrated albums from the 80's. A well produced album with songs that should have been classics. Angel of death (what a great keyboard intro), Renegade (makes me cry with great memories), Leave this town (great riff and boogie track in same league as ZZ Top). Hollywood (Down on your luck) a single that should have been a bigger hit. Mexican Blood is more Phil Lynott solo than a Lizzy track, but I love it. A true master piece is also It's getting dangerous the last track on the album. This album ment a lot in my childhood when I was growing up. It hurts today that this probably was the album that started the downfall om Lizzy's career. But it was more of a bad timing than a weak album. Cause this is stronger than even Chinatown released year before in 1980. And at least as good as the last "harder album" Thunder and Lightning in 1983. Worth every penny, and the remastered version sounds fantastic :-D
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Thin Lizzy album you have to have, 29 Sept. 2013
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This review is from: Renegade (Audio CD)
A Thin Lizzy album you have to have as it's now remastered and you get some extra tracks , GO GET IT .
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars renegade, 29 Oct. 2013
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This review is from: Renegade (Audio CD)
A good album didn't deserve the title worst lizzy album ever . I enjoyed the album very much more so as I am older now . Lizzy always were a better live band than studio band . This album is the band moving with the times. Good album enjoyable but different very polished .
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3.0 out of 5 stars One of Lizzy's less loved albums. Messy, a bit here there and everywhere, but still has some of Lizzy's best songs ever!, 22 Jan. 2015
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This review is from: Renegade (Audio CD)
Although this is collectively one of Thin Lizzy's most inconsistent records full of songs that don't really flow as well as other albums do, it's packed with some truly brilliant tracks!
'Angel Of Death' sounds like a mash-up of Pink Floyd and Iron Maiden before they were really Iron Maiden! The song seamlessly bounces from psychedelic, heavily processed, mellow guitar to a galloping triplet heavy metal riff. Superb.
'Renegade' follows in the same mellow / rocky interchange, and whilst is a bit repetitive, is a great song.
'The Pressure Will Blow' is the more traditional Lizzy song, filled with harmony guitars and rocky riffs. Sadly, there isn't more tracks like this on the album.
'Hollywood' is up there as Lizzy's heaviest track ever along with 'Emerald' and 'Cold Sweat' and is a great, swaggering, groove-laden heavy rock song with huge vocal lines. A live version on the 'Greatest Hits' collection sounds much better than this version however.
The trio of 'Fats,' 'Trouble Boys' and 'Memory Pain' are a bit of a departure and are basically, blues, jazz and almost soul style songs. 'Mexican Blood' is another track that's quite different. While this shows the band are adept at many different styles, it does sound a bit randomly thrown together and does highlight a real lack of coherence and planning for the album. They were at their drug-fuelled low point around this time.
The other songs are ok, but a bit by the numbers and aren't very memorable.
There are a few justified reasons however why this album isn't the Lizzy's most celebrated. A few of the songs are a bit over-indulgent. The title track for example is at least a good minute too long, not that it's a bad song or has a lot of filler, it's just that there is an awful lot of repeats of the verse section, which, interestingly is cut in the 'Edited Single' version of the song which is a bonus track and is probably better.
Also, much has been made of Snowy White's contribution to the band and that he doesn't really 'fit in' to the Lizzy guitarist mould as greats such as Brian Robertson, Gary Moore and even John Sykes after him. The guitar sounds a bit forced sometimes, which perhaps reflects Snowy White's difficulty in getting this style of rock down to a tee, after all, he's a more mellow, ex-Pink Floyd guitarist than a hard-rocking Lizzy lick machine! He still does a good job however, and this is probably the band's second heaviest album after 'Thunder and Lightning.'
The penultimate Thin Lizzy studio album isn't kindly looked upon by many and while it does pale in comparison to classics like 'Jailbreak,' 'Bad Reputation,' 'Black Rose,' 'Fighting' and even 'Thunder and Lightning,' it does deserve it's place in any Lizzy fans collection as there are many brilliant, under the radar, 'lost' classics here which you should treat yourself to hearing!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Thin Lizzy - Renegade 1993 Metal Blade Remaster, March 3, 2011, 24 Mar. 2011
By 
Mr. A. Lawley (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Renegade (Audio CD)
Firstly I'm a big Thin Lizzy/Phil Lynott fan. I have, at some point, owned all the releases, on Vinyl and have, over a number of years been replacing them with CD issues.

I bought the original CD re-issue's and then the 1996 remastered versions of the 1974-1980 releases (Nightlife - Chinatown). I was reasonably happy with those remasters but thought they could've been done a bit better, I found them quite bass heavy.

I've only just become aware of the 1993 Metal Blade remasters of Black Rose, Chinatown, Renegade, Thunder & Lightning & Life "Live". The only available remasters of Renegade, Thunder & Lightning & Life "Live" as far as I know are the 1993 Metal Blade issues, which I have recently purchased.

So for Thin Lizzy fans the Metal Blade reissues sounds fantastic compared to the original CD reissue and the 1996 remasters, Phil's voice has been brought to the fore and there is a good seperation and clarity of all the instruments, the bass is improved but not to the point where it takes over.

Now to the songs,the 1st 3 are classic hard rocking Thin Lizzy songs, full of emotion, the 4th song Leave This Town is good but not as good as the previous 3. Track 5 Hollywood picks it up again and is one of my all time favourite songs. Track 6, No One Told Him is a nod to the more commercial helpings from Black Rose. Then there's a change of style for the last 3 songs, Fats and could be taken from the Johnny The Fox era, Mexican Blood is a hybrid of Thin Lizzy and the sound of Phil Lynott's two solo albums and the last track heads towards Thin Lizzy style, but the keyboards soften it up maybe a bit too much in my opinion.

All in all an excellent Thin Lizzy CD, with a slightly flawed style consistency.

If you like Thin Lizzy & Phil Lynott's solo albums, you'll like this.
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Renegade by Thin Lizzy (Audio CD - 2013)
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