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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars intricate
This second book in the late-Renaissance series centred on pointsman Rathe is similar at first sight to the first but subtly different nonetheless, as if the two plots belonged each to one of the two authors.

The first was more focused on the mistery, on the action that brings to its solving and it was fleshed out with countless details about the lower-class...
Published 17 months ago by Furio

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not quite as gripping as Point of Hopes...
Mainly because the action is contained within the city and on a more domestic level but I'd still rate this at 3.5 stars. Point of Dreams picks up with Rathe and Eslingen some months after the conclusion of Point of Hopes. However, reading the first book isn't necessary to enjoy this one. We learn more of the two main characters' relationship with one another and past...
Published on 19 July 2001


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars intricate, 13 Feb 2013
By 
Furio (Genova - Italy) - See all my reviews
This second book in the late-Renaissance series centred on pointsman Rathe is similar at first sight to the first but subtly different nonetheless, as if the two plots belonged each to one of the two authors.

The first was more focused on the mistery, on the action that brings to its solving and it was fleshed out with countless details about the lower-class characters' way of life.
In this second one the mistery seems not to be the focus of the narrative: it rather seems an excuse to examine characters interaction and the ways of upper classes in the same society. This is true to the point that the identity of the murder is quite clear from the first pages, as are his/her (no spoilers from me) motives.

In a way the novel suffers from this choice.
It also suffers from the understated tone chosen by the authors to describe people's feelings. While it may be a good idea to represent the intimate relationship between the leads (two men) as already established this understatement runs so far and deep that characterization seems to be only superficially attended to, it lacks depth: one cannot really relate to any character.

Nonetheless this novel deserves a good rating. The quality of the writing, the fastidious attention to details, the originality make this a worthwhile read.

I feel like complaining about a detail: the authors, to make their point about a society ruled by women, use "her" and "she" when the sex of the person is not known. This feels quite unnecessary.
Another problem, probably another deliberate choice, is that even after two novels the structure of the Astreiant's society and its basic geography are still unclear: the authors never take the trouble of making them clear. Outright explanations are bound to be clumsy, but some background information and a map would be useful.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not quite as gripping as Point of Hopes..., 19 July 2001
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This review is from: Point of Dreams (Hardcover)
Mainly because the action is contained within the city and on a more domestic level but I'd still rate this at 3.5 stars. Point of Dreams picks up with Rathe and Eslingen some months after the conclusion of Point of Hopes. However, reading the first book isn't necessary to enjoy this one. We learn more of the two main characters' relationship with one another and past lovers, as the heroes combat a theatrical murder which develops into a magical plot against the queen herself. Both the city of Astreiant and its social and political foundations make this a very believable and interesting fantasy world.
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