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67 of 69 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chronicling "Narnia"
Many decades ago, two drinking buddies wrote vastly different fantasy series, which set the groundwork for the fantasy genre. One was J.R.R. Tolkien, author of the classic "Lord of the Rings" and "The Hobbit." And the other was C.S. Lewis, the author of the philosophical "Space Trilogy." Before these two, fantasy was only a few books by a small number of obscure...
Published on 22 Jan 2006 by E. A Solinas

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful books in inferior quality product
It was wonderful to reread the Chronicles of Narnia, there is a lot to learn from these deceptively child-like tales. However this particular set was printed on poor quality paper and boxed in a very flimsy box. If you really want to keep this to look at again and again I would recommend spending more.
Published 21 months ago by Book lover


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45 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The satisfaction of reading them all!!, 11 Sep 2005
I purchased this box set years ago but never got round to actually reading the books however, I decided that it was time to 'get it done'. I decided to read the books in the 'second order' starting with the Magician's Nephew and I have never been so engrossed in a series of books in my life. At the age of 22 it was easy to get through them all although I have to say I felt about 10 years old sitting in my room (naturally under a sheet suspended by two dining room chairs as is the only way to read at that age) not in my early twenties sipping a caramel macchiato in Starbucks!
The stories tell of the land of Narnia ruled by Aslan the lion and the adventures of the Pensieve children as well as a host of other characters who wind their way throughout the seven enchanting books; from Jadis the Snow Queen and Mr Tumnus the faun through to Prince Caspian and the adorable Reepicheep!
The books possess an Orwellian quality in as much as they can be read on two levels. At the first, they are simply beautifully detailed children's books and on a deeper surface they are a reading of Judeo-Christian theology with Aslan being our saviour.
Whichever way you choose to read them, the important thing is that you do!! There is nothing more satisfying than finishing The Last Battle...and crawling out from under that sheet to grab some hot chocolate and jaffa cakes!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Childhood revisted., 23 Jun 2008
My father used to read me the chronicals of narnia when i was about 5. I'd put the stories, however to the back of my mind, like most of us do when we leave our childhood behind. Then a couple of years ago when the lion, the witch and the wardrobe film was released, it set off thinking about those times, years ago. This year, with prince caspian due to arrive in the next week or so, i happened to mention to my girlfriend, sort of 'jokingly' that it might be fun to re-read the books again. Anyway, i turned 28 last week and was quite suprised to open the complete chronicals of narnia box set, my girlfriend had bought from amazon. At first i was hessitant to pick up the magicians nephew. I had so loved the stories when i was a kid of 5 and the anticipation of what would happen each night when i was read another chapter before bedtime! Now, at the age of 28 i was worried that reading them again would in way 'sour' those memories as i would be reading them as an adult with an adult's point of view and perception and not in the same vein as a child. But pick it up, i did and started to read. I was hooked. And while parts my memory were predictably 'hazy' on the details of the book, i was suprised at how much came flooding back after all this time. It is an absolute pleasure to relieve the magic of Narnia. I finished the magician's nephew in 3 days and am about to start the lion, the witch and the wardrobe. I am as excited to continue with the books as i was when i was 5 and have learned something: it you truly loved something in your life, wether its music, films or books, you never really grow out of it no matter how old you are.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly Fantastic, 20 April 1999
By A Customer
Clives Staples Lewis has created a mythical world which absolutely captures the human mind. The Chronicles of Narnia contain exciting plots, which all converge upon each other at the finally of the series: The Last Battle. Through out the books weaves the morals and beliefs of Christianity. These books do a wonder job of telling the story of the Bible, from the instantaneous creation of the world to the death of Aslan (Jesus). The way God cares about every one and desires us to enjoy life through Him, to the last battle and final days at the end of the world (of course Lewis did not know what was going to happen, yet it is still an interesting idea). In one of the best written books of all time, the land of Narnia comes alive with lovable and evil characters. The battle between good and evil is made abruptly apparent in this book as a small country goes through its history fighting for what is right. Light and darkness collide in the Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe as four kids explore the land which they will rule. For a time it appears as though the evil side emerges victorious; but it is found that the White Witch as not the ability to peer far enough back into the depths time. This book it one of the most important of the set, because contained in it is the most important message of all time. My father used to read the Chronicles of Narnia to me when I was younger, now I read them on my own. When he did this he stressed, Christianity is having the relationship with God, like the youths had with Aslan. I think these are very well written books and I would encourage any one to read. I uphold C.S. Lewis as a great writer of the centuries and I praise his books (all of them) as magnificant.
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64 of 70 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantasy for All Ages, 25 Nov 2003
By 
Mark Baker (Santa Clarita, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
I was in third grade when I first found my way into Narnia. It was via a wardrobe in a spare room with Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy. I was immediately hooked, bought the set, read all the books, and got some of my friends to read them as well. A few years later, I reread them, enjoying them just as much the second time. This year, I set out to reread the series for the first time in 15 years. Guess what. I enjoyed them just as much this year as I have previously.
The basic premise of the series is that kids from our world are called into a magical world. Trees are alive, and mythical creatures are common place. Even the animals can talk. The kids are called in a time of crisis to help the inhabitants of Narnia overcome the forces of evil. Each book stands alone, although some of the kids appear in subsequent books.
Actually, there is a debate on what order the series should be read in. Personally, I prefer the order they were written in because that’s the order I read them in. Arguments can be made for reading them in chorological order (THE HORSE AND HIS BOY and THE MAGICIAN’S NEWPHEW were written fifth and sixth even though they take place third and first). Ultimate, very little from one book carries over to the next, so it doesn’t matter. You really could read them in random order and enjoy them just as much.
Since C.S. Lewis was a Christian, these books read on different levels. There is the simple fantasy adventure, which is pure fun. And that can be all you get out of the stories. But just below the surface is a deeper meaning. They worked equally well as allegories, and I usually miss symbolism, so this is fairly easy to get. The stories are not strict allegories, but there is at least one truth from each book that you can take with you into our world.
These are some classics of kid’s literature to be treasured by each generation. But don’t let the fact that they were meant for kids stop you. Anyone can enjoy these timeless tales of fantasy.
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72 of 79 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chronicling "Narnia", 26 Dec 2005
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Many decades ago, two drinking buddies wrote vastly different fantasy series, which set the groundwork for the fantasy genre. One was J.R.R. Tolkien, author of the classic "Lord of the Rings" and "The Hobbit." And the other was C.S. Lewis, the author of the philosophical "Space Trilogy." Before these two, fantasy was only a few books by a small number of obscure authors.
Many years later, C.S. Lewis is still a classic, much-read author, and his books are about to hit the big screen -- "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" will debut in December, following the footsteps of Tolkien's movie adaptations. So, dust off the Narnia Chronicles and reacquaint yourself with these fantasy stories.
"The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe" opens as four children (Lucy, Edmund, Susan and Peter) are being shipped to a country mansion to avoid German bombings. While exploring the house, Lucy accidently ventures into a winter-locked world called Narnia, ruled over by the evil White Witch. The god-king Aslan is about to return to destroy the Witch -- but she has a hold on Edmund....
"Prince Caspian" takes place long after the events of the first book. Young Prince Caspian escapes his uncle's castle when his life is threatened, and he finds refuge with the hidden races of Narnia -- dwarves, talking animals, dryads, centaurs and many others. And to help Caspian regain the throne, the two kings and two queens of Narnia are called back...
"Voyage of the Dawn Treader" begins when Edmund, Lucy and their obnoxious cousin Eustace are sucked through a painting into Narnia, where their pal Caspian is now king of Narnia (not to mention fully grown). Caspian is heading toward the end of the world to find several knights who were banished, and vanished into the perilous islands along the sea. But the Dawn Treader's voyage will literally take them where no one has gone before... and returned to tell about it.
"The Silver Chair" heads into slightly darker territory when Eustace returns to boarding school. He and outcast girl Jill Pole are drawn into Narnia, where Jill must perform a task to redeem herself for a stupid stunt. She must find Caspian's missing son Rilian. This search will send the two children across Narnia with the pessimistic Puddleglum, where they will encounter carnivorous Giants, creepy underground creatures, and an enemy worse than they could have imagined...
"Horse and His Boy" shoots back in time to the middle of the first book. Shasta lives with the man he thinks to be his father in a hovel by the sea, but when he learns that he was a foundling, he escapes with a talking horse, Bree. During his escape, he meets the escaping noblewoman Aravis (who also has a talking horse). The two plan to escape to Narnia. But in the capital city, there is a conspiracy brewing against the visiting Narnian kings and queens, and Shasta and Aravis are drawn into it.
"Magician's Nephew" clears up many of the questions about Narnia, Aslan and the White Witch. Digory and Polly end up in very serious trouble when they encounter Digory's weird, slightly nutty uncle, a magician who has created magical rings that send the user to other worlds. They accidently set loose the evil Queen Jadis, who goes on a rampage through London -- until they pull her out of our world, and into the newborn world of Narnia.
"The Last Battle" is definitely the end of the series, where Narnia has decayed into violence and hatred, as a prelude to the final battle between good and evil. Humans are destroying the trees and killing the dryads, and a false Aslan is appearing to mislead the fearful inhabitants of Narnia. Old and new friends -- some from other worlds -- will band together as the true Aslan prepares to lead them to a new land.
Anyone who dislikes allegory -- religious or otherwise -- should steer clear of the Chronicles. While Lewis' beliefs are presented in a more complex and subtle manner in his other books, like the Space Trilogy, the parallels to Christian belief are very obvious here. Even Tolkien, who was Lewis' longtime friend, found that annoying.
But as a fantasy, this series is a fantastic read, and was also the first of the kids-get-swept-into-other-worlds novels. Lewis reshapes typical mythical elements like dwarves, nymphs, talking animals, centaurs and wicked witches into shape in his invented world. Moreover, his land of Narnia is a complex and very inviting place. It's not always fun, but Lewis always leaves you with the feeling that the good guys will come out on top.
Like many other British authors writing for kids, Lewis' writing can get a bit precious. But he includes loads of detail, mystery and cultural intrigure in his stories -- and not just for Narnia either. For example, Calormene is a sort of generic Middle-Eastern land, very Arabian Nights. It's full of culture and beauty, but also with good guys and bad guys.
What's more, readers can appreciate the mysteries and questions that Lewis sprinkles through the book, and which are explained as the story goes on. Where did the lamppost come from, for example? Why are there humans in Narnia? Where did Reepicheep go? Most of these are answered at one point or another.
The Chronicles of Narnia are a longstanding classic, fun and dramatic and action-packed. For a bit more insight into the forthcoming movie -- and the history of fantasy -- check out "The Chronicles of Narnia."
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gorgeous Gift, 13 July 2009
By 
C. Stinton - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
We bought this book for my partners little boy as a wedding gift, we thought it would be something which would last him for years and which we can personalise with a message inside.
The book itself is gorgeous, the illustartions are lovely and the overall quality is fantastic.
Although the stories will be wasted on him at this age we are hoping it will be something he will look back on as an adult. Would definately recommend.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Collection, 16 Feb 2009
By 
The The Chronicles Of Narnia collectors edition may seem like a lot of money but trust me, its worth it.
The book temselves are amazing, pure genius and their popularity seems to reflect just how great they are. From all generations these books have been read, and are just as popular with one as with another, whether thats 80 years old to 8 years old.
But why buy these Narnia books? Why this particular boxset? Well firstly your grabing a real bargain with RRP £90 anything less is a real deal, but also because of the way these Narnia books are set. In a special collectors box, each a hardcover book, in a specialy designed cover. The box itself looks magnificent, bringing to life C.S Lewis' creations.

This Chronicles of Narnia boxset is one to be cherished throughout the ages, sitting beautifully amoung amy shelf it will take centre piece.
An amazing buy.
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78 of 86 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Chronicles of Narnia, 4 Aug 2002
By A Customer
The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis consist of seven books The Magician's Nephew, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, The Horse and his Boy, Prince Caspian, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, The Silver Chair and The Last Battle. These books tell the tale of Narnia from its creation in The Magician's Nephew to its destruction in The Last Battle. The books are loosely based on the bible and tell the story of the battle between good and evil in a new way. Each of these seven books tells a story of adventures battle and courage. My favourite is The Voyage of the Dawn Treader a book about a voyage to the end of the world where the water is sweet and the mermaids live. Lovers of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings and J.K. Rowling Harry Potter will worship these books. They will also be interested to know that J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis were great friends. These books are wonderful as they are emotion books they make you laugh out loud or even cry. This is a wonderful edition of a fantastic book.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Chronicles of Narnia, 20 Mar 2007
By 
Ruth Nuttall (Sheffield, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This was bought for my little girl but I have just steadily worked my way through the whole set. The magic of these stories is evident whatever your age. From the beginning of creation to the end of the world there is adventure for every child that reads the stories. Talking beasts, worlds in wardrobes, witches and of course, the human children. These are stories to be read over and over as children and into adulthood. Absolutely wonderful.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 25 Feb 2001
By A Customer
Their are many versions of the Narnia books available to purchase but In my opinion this is the finest one. The words and lines are evenly spaced, there are fantastic colour drawings, the words are of a perfect size to read and it is printed on laminate paper. It is also worth noting that Pauline Baynes, who's colour drawings are in the book, drew the original drawings for the 1950's version of this book.
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