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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars why is this so underated?
The final official Clash album was their most commercially successful, yet in terms of praise it has little. I think that to understand `Combat Rock' you have to first have been able to appreciate `Sandinista!' While less ambitious than the former album, `Combat Rock' covers styles and ideas pursued through all the bands albums.

`Combat Rock' features those two...
Published on 30 Mar 2003 by The Chad Who Loved Me

versus
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not worth the 'upgarde' really...
Review for 2013 remaster.
I only ordered Combat Rock from these new 2013 remasters, as my old copy seems to have left home.
Most of you reading this will probably already know the music on the album, for me it's the most inconsistent album The Clash made (Forget Cut the Crap)which ironically featured two of the biggest hits (we all know what they were)...
Published 11 months ago by Richard C. Button


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars why is this so underated?, 30 Mar 2003
This review is from: Combat Rock (Audio CD)
The final official Clash album was their most commercially successful, yet in terms of praise it has little. I think that to understand `Combat Rock' you have to first have been able to appreciate `Sandinista!' While less ambitious than the former album, `Combat Rock' covers styles and ideas pursued through all the bands albums.

`Combat Rock' features those two big hits, `Should I Stay Or Should I Go' and 'Rock The Casbah', while the remainder is often dismissed as disappointing. This disparity is very rewarding through further listening. `Sean Flynn', `Ghetto Defendant', `Red Angel Dragnet' are odd the first time round, and but more idiosyncratic and engaging with each further listen. The album musically embodies the bands strains and problems. The stripped sound production is obviously a result of its recording on the road. Another distancing feature of the album is the generally negative and down-tempo feel. This is in strong contrast to their earlier rebellious and up-tempo aggression on the debut and `Give `em Enough Rope' albums. Apart from the two energising hit singles the material sinks in differently. This makes for a totally new kind of Clash album. `Combat Rock' is the next step from `Sandinista!' yet it has a stronger set of pop tunes and hooks closer to `London Calling'.

All in all the greatest virtue of the set is 'Straight To Hell'. It is possibly the most beautiful and sorrowful song they ever wrote. It's inclusion half way through the running order can upset the mix, especially so since the listener is propelled into 'Overpowered by Funk'. `Combat Rock' is definitely an album for an open mind and is a great last hurrah for Mick and Topper. While it may be the groups most overlooked album, it is still as much a complement since the bands standard was so high.

(As a side note it is worth noting that it's so unjust that 'Know Your Rights' is always left off of other Clash compilations. I love it)
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent record., 14 July 2007
This review is from: Combat Rock (Audio CD)
This seems ot divide opinion more than any other Clash album - some see it as a sell out, others as a return to form following the sprawling, flawed Sandinista. Im certainly in the latter camp; i love this record, and certainly believe the criticism levelled at it is wholy unfair: its a "sell out", why? Because it had two hit singles on it? London Calling was hardly Aphex Twin either, was it? Ironically the Clash's attempt to "reign it in" following the musical binging that was Sandinista is where, in my opinion, this album fails. It has a fairly good cross section of musical styles on here, but fails to really sink into any kind of groove due to the genre-hopping combined with its relative (ie for a Clash album) brevity. Strummers lyrics have also deepened on this record - Allen Ginsberg turns up on Ghetto Defendant and its clear on some of the other tracks (Car Jamming, Straight To Hell) that he was an influence on Strummers songwwriting. It came out at a time when the Clash had just broke big (that is Shea Stadium, albeit supporting the Who, big) in America, and i think this is one of the major influences in people who claim this record is commercial. In my opinion, its no more commercial than London Calling or even the first Clash record, which did appear, lest we forget, in 1977 - a time when no punk record could fail.

Probably my third favourite Clash record, which would place it in my top 15-20 of all time. Love it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars And Papa Sam says...., 1 Sep 2006
This review is from: Combat Rock (Audio CD)
Following on from the gargantuan and indulgent "Sandanista" the Clash went and got a bit global on us with this album.

There's the standards that are unarguably, irrefutable classics. "Should I Stay Or Should I Go" - a no-brainer guitar riff that is so obviously mesmeric. "..Cashbah" being an eccentric classic with Topper's piano riff carrying it.

However, the real charm of this album lays in it's highpoint - the profound and elegant "Straight To Hell" which stands up as one of the most moving and bizarre tracks they ever put down. Bleak post-'Nam lyrics and a fascinating musical back-drop.

Some pleasant but indecisive noodling towards the end perhaps lets this album down a little from being a full-blown masterwork.

But this remains a defining album and a reminder of what The Clash had about them that so many other bands don't.

Even Travis Bickle pops up.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "This Is A Public Service Announcement", 12 July 2001
By 
A. Reynolds "adrian_j_r" (Mexico) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Combat Rock (Audio CD)
'Know Your Rights' is possibly the high-point of the Clash-as-protesters but this album also sees the shift toward commercial mode with 'Rock The Casbah' and 'Should I Stay'.
They had done better and, as musicians in other ventures, they would do well too. This collection marks the death of the old-Clash and is interesting from the historical perspective but the material is either commercial bold or inaccessable.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 22 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Combat Rock (Audio CD)
There isn't a track on here that I don't like - they are all excellent. Sure, it's not London Calling, but why expect it to be? The Clash were on the verge of splitting and all the members' musical tastes were changing, moving in different directions, and the result is this - where outdated punk met the new musical world of pop and rock and funk and reggae. It's also the first LP I bought, so I guess I'm always going to be biased towards it - its actually my all-time favourite record. Everybody should own a copy - as well as everything else by The Clash. So go get shopping!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not worth the 'upgarde' really..., 10 Sep 2013
By 
Richard C. Button (Nottingham, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Combat Rock (Audio CD)
Review for 2013 remaster.
I only ordered Combat Rock from these new 2013 remasters, as my old copy seems to have left home.
Most of you reading this will probably already know the music on the album, for me it's the most inconsistent album The Clash made (Forget Cut the Crap)which ironically featured two of the biggest hits (we all know what they were).
So...the reissue comes in a kind of mini LP card sleeve, with the cd housed in a replica of the original inner sleeve. that's it though, no booklet or any more info, maybe they saved all that stuff for the new box set.
The sound? no better than the last 'remaster' to my ears, i won't be upgrading the first 4 albums, they sound great anyway!
BUT...if you don't have it already, then it's well worth the price.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Combat Rock: The Clash - Listen to this and be overpowered by the funk!, 9 Sep 2011
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Combat Rock (Audio CD)
There seem to be many parallels between today and the late seventies. A time of economic depression, a working class trodden down by the conscienceless political rulers and moneyed elite, ethnic tensions simmering, a generation of young people with no future prospects ready to lash out a wave of destruction in the form of riots in protest at the injustices of the world they find themselves in. And the development of a new musical form which encapsulates the passion, the anger and the political stance of the youth. OK, perhaps the similarities end there, as plastic Cowell pop seems to be the hallmark and legacy of this generation, but thirty years ago the social situation gave rise to just such a musical form, Punk. And the prime exponents were the Clash.

In the wake of the grandiloquent failure that was Sandinistas!, Combat Rock is a very different affair. Recorded at a time when Punk had pretty much died the death, the group had moved on musically. This record seems to achieve what Sandinistas! couldn't. Merging their original sound, so full of passion and their political and social awareness with new influences, chiefly funk and to an extent electronica. It is the apotheosis of the band's musical journey, and a tantalising hint of the greatness that might have come if the classic line up had stayed together and recorded another album.

The opener, `Know Your Right's', is pure, unadulterated classic Clash. Social conscience and satire merged with saw tooth guitars and angry, snarling vocals. And after the recent riots and their possible cause who can argue that the lines `you have the right not to be killed, because murder is a crime - unless it is done by a policeman', still have resonance and relevance today? Every verse deals with an aspect of the way the state intrudes on our lives, and thirty years on, rather worryingly, we still have the same problems and concerns.

`Should I stay', is the big commercial hit from the album, and probably the song they are best known to the general public for. In respects it is totally untypical of the group, but listen to it and you start to get the sneer in Strummer's voice, the anger in the famous guitar riff and you realise that all is not as it seems, and this is a song that fits perfectly with the band's vision.

`Rock the Casbah' provides another fun and satirical look at British foreign policy, and leads into a series of tracks where the band really move away from their classic sound and try something different. Overpowered by funk is a hard edged groove, showing how versatile the lads were. Straight to Hell and Atom Tan sound odd at first, but listen to the lyrics. These are great songs, with lots to say about the world around us.

In all a classic in the Clash's oeuvre, and a real high note for the band to finish up on.
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5.0 out of 5 stars May death rain down upon you all, 22 Jun 2014
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This review is from: Combat Rock (Audio CD)
1982, eh, there was a year, I was only a child myself but my lord. The Jam split up, the Falklands nonsense, the usual World Cup disappointment, Keegan's back, etc., Captain Sensible, Come On, Eileen, the 20p piece, Tight Fit, Rene and Renate, Culture Club, E.T., Boys From the Blackstuff, Channel Four (Brookside, Countdown), Aston Villa won the European Cup, Lebanon, and this, The Clash's last proper album, came out. Buy it and become conscious. Joe Strummer was and remains a true superstar, unlike so many smelly sell outs. Looks like he was right about Weller fro the off. I'd rather have an Orwell or a Benn figure than one going the other way.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect, 5 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Combat Rock (Audio CD)
Everything perfect! The album is a must, the seller as always perfect and in general all my experience with Zoverstocks is very good!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Combat Rock The Clash, 19 Dec 2013
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This review is from: Combat Rock (Audio CD)
Combat Rock
The Clash, if you like the clash then you will love this its one of the best around.
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Combat Rock [VINYL]
Combat Rock [VINYL] by The Clash (Vinyl - 2013)
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