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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fork out for the Knife! (See what I did there? Oh yes).
The Knife, Sweden's wonderful brother and sister electro group, return with this, their third proper studio album. Despite recent exposure courtesy of a Jose Gonzalez cover version of their song 'Heartbeats' (as well as strangley being championed by Victoria Newton of The Sun), the Knife are still relative unknowns outside of their homeland. For those of you who do know...
Published on 31 Mar 2006 by Adam McGee

versus
4 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ukhik
One of the greatest sounding records ever designed, seriously. There is an approach, almost entirely contained within electronic music, very dear to my heart, and that is producing tracks that seem to have had no human contact before you arrived. Sure, you read the reviews, listen to the MP3s floating around, have you hipster friends inanely hyping it up, but when you...
Published on 2 Jun 2008 by 77


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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fork out for the Knife! (See what I did there? Oh yes)., 31 Mar 2006
This review is from: Silent Shout (Audio CD)
The Knife, Sweden's wonderful brother and sister electro group, return with this, their third proper studio album. Despite recent exposure courtesy of a Jose Gonzalez cover version of their song 'Heartbeats' (as well as strangley being championed by Victoria Newton of The Sun), the Knife are still relative unknowns outside of their homeland. For those of you who do know the Knife, however, what a treat is in store for you! Altogether darker than 'Deep Cuts' and their eponymous debut, the multi-layered compositions and voice distortions take on an entirely new level on this album. Although the overall feel is sombre both musically and lyrically ("They said we had a communist in the family, I had to wear a mask" from 'Forest Families'), the Knife still delve into flashes of upbeat electronica, 'We Share Our Mother's Health' sees the Knife return to 'Kino' style territory, an almost-unlistenable mess of beeps that somehow manages to stick together to make a cohesive mess that's challenging and enjoyable. 'Like A Pen' wouldn't be out of place on a dingy indie dancefloor and 'Neverland', features one of the catchiest tunes you'd ever wish to hear. Karin's voice is twisted that way, distorted this way and put through all kinds of treatment, giving every Knife track it's own unique feel (can we say that about the Libertines/Babyshambes/Dirty Pretty Things?) Standout track 'Marble House' reaches the emotional intensity set by 'Heartbeats' from 'Deep Cuts', although a minor niggle is the male vocals on this track - personally he creeps me out a bit, but that's just me. I recently read a review of this album that dismissed it because the reviewer claimed to be a 'guitarophile' and that electro isn't very good. Well. If you can take a chance on something and perhaps be a little more aware that music doesn't have to be confined to one instrument, the Knife would be a good place to start. While indie will always be in my little heart, this album is, as Stingray from Neighbours would say, 'spiggin' awesome', and will always have it's fair share of rotations.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Shout it loud, The Knife are a band on the cutting edge, 31 Mar 2006
By 
russell clarke "stipesdoppleganger" (halifax, west yorks) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Silent Shout (Audio CD)
Anyone basing their knowledge of The knife on the fact that recent hit for Jose Gonzalez "Heartbeats" was actually a cover of one of their songs will be gob smacked by "Silent Shout". Excuse me while I get an ice pack for my jaw. I knew they used electronics but nothing had prepared me for the alien textures, insidious alien ambience and ghostly menace of much of "Silent Shout". Not that , that presents a problem for me but if " Heartbeats " led you to expect some diffusely warm pastoral idyll you'll be distinctly un-nerved by the jagged slopes of icy granite and frigid tundra "Silent Shout" leads you to.
Formed by Swedish siblings Olof Dreijer and Karen Dreijer Andersson The Knife have previously released three albums , each an exponential improvement over the last , leading to this , easily the most focused and coherent of their output so far. Melding esoteric contemporary electronic instrumentation with often bizarre vocal styling , particularly those of Andersson ( Whose voice approximates Bjork doing a Kate Bush impression while inhaling helium ) The Knife produce music that presents a challenging listen but nearly always an enjoyable one. That is not easy to achieve. Needless to say they go to far sometimes and occasionally generate something that is not so much challenging as damm near impossible to get the head around. The pitter patter rhythmic nuances of "Like A Pen" drag on to deleterious effect while "From Off To On" is far too nebulous and prosaic.
Happily the majority of the arrangements on "Silent Shout" are melodically bracing while seasoned with that tangible air of the strange yet glamorous. The albums eponymous opening track has spangled keyboards and precision percussion over the hushed vocals. "Neverland" is a potential dance/club crossover with radiant synth swathes and springy rhythmic pulses. "Captain the" has Anderssons voice multi tracked and treated. It's like a hymn from some trans -dimensional frost covered entity. The refracted notes of "We Share Our Mothers Health" boing around like diffuse balls of brittle glitter. The interplay between the vocals is superbly arranged giving the song a compelling dichotomous character. "Na Na Na" centres on a wonderfully effortless keyboard refrain and Anderssons compelling siren voice. "Marble House" is a torch song refracted through a faulty hall of mirrors while "Forest Families" coats a more restrained Andersson vocal in a blanket of bubbling atmosphere and low key dissonance. "One Hit" is tremendous, a track I can only describe as The Butthole Surfers covering Can via The Smurfs. Childish and chilling at the same time. "Still Light" percolates woozy ambience over a deathbed tale of twilight poetry.
Juxtaposing the likes Of "Kid A " Radiohead, dashes of Sigur Ros ,and just about any progenitor of electronic music you care to mention "Silent Shout" is a superb album that falls just shy of being an out and out classic. Despite the preponderance of gloomy techno edges and its other worldly tone "Silent Shout" is a hugely stimulating listen. Shout it from the roof tops, The Knife are on the cutting edge.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Still worth Buying!, 23 Aug 2006
This review is from: Silent Shout (Audio CD)
This album isn't as uplifting as Deep Cuts and you will have to listen to it a few times to really get into it. But I am comparing it to the previous album which would take a lot to top. It is still better than a lot of other stuff out there. There are tunes on this album which are fantastic such as, Silent Shout, We Share Our Mothers Health and Like A Pen. It's also the technicallity of this album which will make you apreciate it that much more.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cuts deep, 27 Jun 2007
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Silent Shout (Audio CD)
This Swedish electropp dup is still pretty low-profile, though the Knife seem to be following in the footsteps of Broadcast -- eerie, atmospheric, pretty pop music. Third album "Silent Shout" returns to the band's root sounds, after the harder techno of their last album, and it's a breath of electronic fresh air.

It opens with the blippy, spacey beats of the title track, which shimmers all over the place over some heavy grounding beats. A chorus of voices murmur, like a choir of robots. It's a great intro, and it's a big contrast to the song that comes after it -- the ominous, stomping techno of "Neverland."

The rest of the album is an attempt to reconcile the two previous sounds the band has had -- hard techno, and airy electropop. After "Neverland," there are a couple straightforward techno songs that sound like a spacier Autechre, including the robotic "Like A Pen" and the schizophrenic space bleeps of "We Share Our Mothers' Health."

But the majority of these songs are softer and stranger. The Knife dips into spacey experimental music, tropical ambience with eerie yowls, shimmery electropop, ominous lullabies, and one song that sounds like a distress call from a spaceship, set to a soft electronic beat. It winds up with the undulating, whispery "Still Light," which is perhaps the creepiest song of all.

In "Silent Shout," the Knife strike a good balance between techno and experimental soundscapes, which was missing from their previous two albums -- both were good, but they had entirely different music. They've learned moderation, using the harder beats in a softer melody, and also creating dreamy soundscapes that may not get people dancing, but might transport them to another planet.

The harder beats don't even sound catchy -- they sound more like a sonic attack. Other synth gets twisted into kettle drums, pretty shimmers, and eerie sonic walls. Karin's voice is heavily filtered by computers, but this isn't done because it's a bad voice. Rather, it makes the pretty, fragile vocals fit in with the otherworldly music, as she lets out a series of Bjorkian yowls and murmurs.

The Knife would do a great job with the soundtrack to a sci-fi movie, since they already have the right sound -- chilly, eerie and beautiful.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pleasing to ones ears, 20 April 2006
By 
Mr. Kevin O' Brien "Kevbomb" (Limerick , Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Silent Shout (Audio CD)
I first heard this album on vinyl the other week when I was looking for some new mixing material. I didn't buy it then, because I new this was one of those electro albums I would love listening to and not mixing. Not to say there aren't good tracks for mixing. More then half the album would be great for mixing. This album just has something else that most dancefloor friendly electro albums don't.

There are great melodies and atmospheres created throughout the album. Then theres the vocals. I must say the female vocalist of "The Knife" has one of the most interesting and seductive voices I've heard in any genre of music. Her voice demands your attention. Electro songs without vocals lack a certain connection with the listener. And a lot of vocals in elecro songs

are just monotone and sleazy. Some are good. But some can just sound lame and annoying. Her voice is the best I've heard in dance music. I'm not going to go into what each song sounds like and what they're about, cause my writing probably wouldn't do them justice. If you want to hear the album go there website, "the Knife". You can hear influences of Kraftwerk

and others, but there sound is quite dark and unique and really draws you in. No complaints. I love it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars perhaps the greatest electronic album of all time., 12 Dec 2013
This review is from: Silent Shout [VINYL] (Vinyl)
I remember the first time I heard 'we share our mother's health', the lead single from this album; I fell in love instantly. The vocals.. the dissonant, ridiculous synths, the power and swing of the drums, and the lyrics... I had to have more of it, so I got my hands on the album. Man, I wasn't disappointed. Each and every song is finely crafted, beautiful, chilling, dark and incredible.

The title track, 'silent shout' features beautiful synthesizers, huge drums and fever ray's insane vocals. So much beauty. So intricate.. the lyrics are personal and yet very relateable.

'Neverland' is powerful and exiting, energetic and so engaging. The lyrics are flipping brilliant too.

'The captain' is again just pure beauty. A long introduction of screaming, dissonant, wailing synthesizers, building into a huge track. Fever ray's vocals are, again, insane... so ridiculous yet so emotive.

'Na na na' is possibly one of my favourite tracks on the album. It literally brings forth tears. The simplicity of the music, the monotonous yet beautiful arp, Anne literally the most chillingly beautiful vocal melody, possibly ever. The definition of beauty in my eyes.

One hit one kiss. Like a pen... still light.

I urge anyone to do anything they can to own this album. Mind blowing. Incredible. I will never be the same man after I listened to this collection of recordings. As I said; the definition of beauty.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Silent Shout, 16 Jan 2007
This review is from: Silent Shout (Audio CD)
Silent Shout finds The Knife trading in the industrial strength synths of Kraftwerk and sonorous clubland basslines that belie their origins in dance music rather than electronica. Some of the descriptions of the music on this album would have you thinking they might sound like Icelandic electronica stalwarts Mum, but this is not nearly as finnickity - not a glitch in sight. This sounds like deconstructed symphonic house music cross bred with the icey pop fantasies of Kate Bush. Opener Silent Shout sets the mood, waves of 303 shot from speaker to speaker while ominous, heavily synthesised vocals establish a pesistent melodic hook. Better is the sinister electro pop of "Neverland" with its subversive lyricism and vitriolic delivery: "I'm dancing for dollars... for a fancy man". Whereas the extensive driftiness and stark ambience of The Captain doesn't work for me, the album gets back on track with the propulsive assault of 'We Share our Mother's Health'. Male and female vocals intertwine over razor sharp electro and jet engine basslines in what one might imagine an Andrew Lloyd Webber duet might sound like if remixed by Squarepusher (I mean this in a good way). Other highlights include the fantastic sub-zero pop ballad Marble House which ends, as many great songs do, on its most intriguing lyric: "some things I do for money, some things I do for free". A word of warning, the album cut of the excellent Like A Pen does not work as well as the single version, which builds on the vocal hooks and omits the extended instrumental exit featured here. Overall, a strange and uncompromising album full of cold, sometimes abrasive textures (almost all vocals are synthesised) but curiously catchy pop.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Shout out, 31 Aug 2006
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Silent Shout (Audio CD)
This Swedish electropp dup is still pretty low-profile, though the Knife seem to be following in the footsteps of Broadcast -- eerie, atmospheric, pretty pop music. Third album "Silent Shout" returns to the band's root sounds, after the harder techno of their last album, and it's a breath of electronic fresh air.

It opens with the blippy, spacey beats of the title track, which shimmers all over the place over some heavy grounding beats. A chorus of voices murmur, like a choir of robots. It's a great intro, and it's a big contrast to the song that comes after it -- the ominous, stomping techno of "Neverland."

The rest of the album is an attempt to reconcile the two previous sounds the band has had -- hard techno, and airy electropop. After "Neverland," there are a couple straightforward techno songs that sound like a spacier Autechre, including the robotic "Like A Pen" and the schizophrenic space bleeps of "We Share Our Mothers' Health."

But the majority of these songs are softer and stranger. The Knife dips into spacey experimental music, tropical ambience with eerie yowls, shimmery electropop, ominous lullabies, and one song that sounds like a distress call from a spaceship, set to a soft electronic beat. It winds up with the undulating, whispery "Still Light," which is perhaps the creepiest song of all.

In "Silent Shout," the Knife strike a good balance between techno and experimental soundscapes, which was missing from their previous two albums -- both were good, but they had entirely different music. They've learned moderation, using the harder beats in a softer melody, and also creating dreamy soundscapes that may not get people dancing, but might transport them to another planet.

The harder beats don't even sound catchy -- they sound more like a sonic attack. Other synth gets twisted into kettle drums, pretty shimmers, and eerie sonic walls. Karin's voice is heavily filtered by computers, but this isn't done because it's a bad voice. Rather, it makes the pretty, fragile vocals fit in with the otherworldly music, as she lets out a series of Bjorkian yowls and murmurs.

The Knife would do a great job with the soundtrack to a sci-fi movie, since they already have the right sound -- chilly, eerie and beautiful.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece, 7 Nov 2013
By 
D. M. VICTOR (Cornwall , UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Silent Shout (Audio CD)
A magnificent album in it's own right. Made even better with the inclusion of the concert, which is simply magnificent. Could be their crowning glory.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The ultimate edition of a great album, 4 Jan 2013
The Knife are an indie/electronic duo from Sweden who make music that is truly unique. Silent Shout is perhaps their greatest album, and was named the best album of 2006 by Pitchfork Media which is quite an achievement. It is a fantastic album full of memorable and haunting songs.

This deluxe edition is unbelievably good value for money. Not only do you get the original album CD, you also get a CD of their live concert in Gothenburg on April 12, 2006. Also included is a DVD which consists of a recording of the same show, as well as all 11 of their (sometimes excellent - Pass This On for example) music videos, and a short film.

It goes without saying that this beautiful package is a must have for all Knife fans, even if they already have the original Silent Shout CD. And for those who haven't heard of the Knife buy this - you won't be disappointed
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