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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 12 October 2007
This second part of Doris Lessing's candid biography, which depicts her difficult beginnings in London, is a more bitter report than the first one. It is full of personal and ideological disappointments.

Like so many young intellectuals in Europe, she finds a shelter in the leftist Church (with capitalism as hell, Lenin, Stalin or Mao as Christ the Saviour, and Utopia as heaven) and becomes a believer in heart and soul. She still has difficulties to believe why she was so blind (even after a trip to Russia) and stayed so long with the communist movement. For her fellow companions she thinks that they stayed because they wanted to be part of an elite and a power club. The agonizing psychological struggle to become an apostate is very emotionally told.

What saved her was art, in which she has a limitless belief: it can overthrow world powers.

This is a moving, uninhibited and realistic work, exemplary for many idealistic but wilfully deceived young people in the nineteen fifties and sixties.
Not to be missed.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 1 February 2009
I know Ms. Lessing doesn't want to talk much about her children and her relationship with them, but I feel this leaves out a lot about herself that can be connected with other parts of her life that she does talk about in depth.
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on 26 June 2013
The book was bound together in the common way where pages are glued to the cover. Several of the pages have now fallen completely off the glue, and are now loose, despite my only having the book for a few weeks, and reading it only once. In addition, there were printing errors throughout where the letters were slightly elongated or double printed. It is still readable, but blurred.
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on 15 November 2014
I absolutely love this book. It is best read whilst travelling with few distractions. Lessing's observations and wisdom about her experiences and times remain very relevant. I think this book, along with 'Prisons we choose to live inside', should be required reading.
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on 16 November 2014
Give this book a chance full of minute facts and names skipped a lot but how enlightening What insight to post war Britain and its intellectuals Makes me glad I'm not one but very fascinating to know how the other half lived and thought
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 22 June 2002
The second volume of Doris Lessing's autobiography, taking us from her arrival in London in 1949 to the publication of her seminal 'Golden Notebook' in 1962.
'Walking in the Shade' takes us into a darker world: her struggles as a single parent, making her way in a male world; her political battles and disillusionment; fraught relationships and emotional turmoil; and her determination to win through and maintain independence through her literary skills.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Interesting account of author's life and insight into life in those times (part 2 - but you could probably read it without having read part 1). Some people might find it slow and overly wordy. Item as described and arrived on time.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 7 July 2013
I am very happy that I got the book while was about to finish the first one. It was on time service. Well done.
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