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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First class 3D on a region free disc update
I have to say right now that I have not watched all the film. This is just to let people know my initial thoughts on the disc. First off, I can confirm that it is region free!

The picture quality is pretty much perfect considering the age of the film.

The 3D is outstanding!, like I said, I have not watched all the film but based on the first 10-15...
Published 17 months ago

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A Vat of Hot Wax to Kill and to Perpetuate Beauty Is What the Heroine Barely Avoids
What a contrast there is between the two cinematic accounts of this tale of horror and gore! "Mystery of the Wax Museum" is the earlier of the two, from 1933, set in the "roaring '20s" then moving onwards to the "flirty '30s", is faster moving, racier, and more light-hearted, a tale of a sassy gal reporter as much as, or more, than a tale of the macabre. Fay Wray, of...
Published 1 month ago by Gerald Parker


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First class 3D on a region free disc update, 11 Oct. 2013
This review is from: House of Wax [Blu-ray] [1953] [US Import] (Blu-ray)
I have to say right now that I have not watched all the film. This is just to let people know my initial thoughts on the disc. First off, I can confirm that it is region free!

The picture quality is pretty much perfect considering the age of the film.

The 3D is outstanding!, like I said, I have not watched all the film but based on the first 10-15 minutes that I have watched the 3D is outstanding quality and in some respects shows up a lot of more recent 3D efforts.

The aspect ratio looks about right but I cannot say for sure because I am no expert on aspect ratio's.

In a nutshell, it's region free and perfect 3D so if you are thinking of getting this, don't hesitate any more, get your hands on a copy as soon as you can.

I have given the product a 5 star rating based on the film itself and I am sure after watching all of the film (3D) it will still rate 5 stars. I will update my review when I have watched the film all the way through.

The extra's are:

Commentary by David Del Valle and Constantine Nasr.
Newsreel.
Theatrical trailer
1933 Warner Bros feature..Mystery of the wax museum (complete film)
House of Wax: Unlike anything you've seen before. (45 min documentary)

October 15th update
Well I have watched all the film (3D) and as I suspected, it is pretty much perfect. Actually, this 3D film puts most 'modern' 3D films to shame. Surprisingly, there is not a lot of jump out moments, what this film gives you is real depth and believe me, that is how it should be. I will say this, watch out for a scene with Charles Bronson near the end, the 3D effect is truly realistic. Won't spoil the scene but you will know it when you see it!

Ok, the bottom line ........perfect film, perfect 3D.....buy with confidence.
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57 of 61 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars GREAT NEWS!!! - UNDISCLOSED EXTRAS! - EXTRA FILM!, 3 Nov. 2005
This review is from: House Of Wax [DVD] [1953] (DVD)
Wow! not only do you get HOUSE OF WAX starring Vincent Price on this DVD but also MYSTERY OF THE WAX MUSEUM, the earlier, 1933 film starrin LIONELL ATWILL on which its based. AND.... some great, silent newsreel footage of the premiere of the VINCENT PRICE version, you see BELA LUGOSI turning up with a man dressed as a gorilla!!!!!!!! really bizarre.
NOT as bizzare though as WARNERS strange decision NOT to advertise these extras on the packaging, I only noticed that under the cast/credits of the VINCENT PRICE version on the back of the box there was also in tiny writing the cast list of the LIONELL ATWILL version...and so put it in my DVD player and WOW!
This is a GREAT dvd with 2 superb movies...it would sell tons more if WARNERS done a proper job on the packaging.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars House of Wax - as it should be seen!, 8 Feb. 2014
This review is from: House of Wax [Blu-ray] [1953] [US Import] (Blu-ray)
At last, after 60 years, the chance to see House of Wax as it was originally envisaged – in 3D! A revolutionary film at the time of its release, the film was the first major studio production to be shot in this process and it presented Vincent Price as the murderous owner of a wax museum - a role that would open up new career horizons and establish him as a horror icon.

Perhaps the film won’t shock contemporary viewers as it did back in 1953 but it still has grotesque impact, undoubtedly heightened by the third dimension, especially in the museum’s cellar sequence as a frightened Phyllis Kirk tries to escape the clutches of Charles Bronson. To the 3D process itself, although it might not have objects hurtling out of the screen (apart from sequences featuring a theatre barker with bat and balls and female dancers kicking out their legs) its real strength lies in the depth of vision created by the moving camerawork – a remarkable feat by one-eyed director Andre DeToth who, obviously, would never witness the full results of his work.

Finely restored to its original glory for its’ BluRay debut, the disc also includes the film in normal 2D and “Mystery Of The Wax Museum”, the 1933 two-strip Technicolor horror that was the source for “House of Wax” two decades later. Plus other extras include soundtrack commentary, trailer, newsreel and ”House Of Wax: Unlike Anything You’ve Ever Seen Before”, a fascinating 50 minutes insight into the creation of the movie. Overall, a deservedly top class presentation for such a ground-breaking film that might, hopefully, lead on to the release of further third dimension movies.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Decent film with a wonderful extra!, 22 Jun. 2007
This review is from: House Of Wax [DVD] [1953] (DVD)
The Vincent Price film is fun for most of its running time. Price is good value as always and there are some good set pieces - including the initial fire in the wax museum and some well staged fogbound stalking. However it is let down by a plodding pace and a weak supporting cast that gives the film a very 'buttoned down' fifties feel.

As noted by the first reviewer an 'extra' on this disc is the earlier Michael Curtiz version from the 1930s which is simply fantastic. This is scripted at a much faster pace and has a far more satisfying story based around a newspaper reporter (wise cracking blonde Glenda Farrel)investigating the case. It is filmed in the early two strip technicolor process which has a muted and limited colour range but in fact this really adds to the atmosphere of the film. Fay Wray gets to scream a lot and look pretty (she succeeds on both counts) and Lionell Atwill makes the villain a believable human being (and therefore all the more chilling). Echoes of art deco in some of the set designs adds another pleasing dimension to the staging of the film. A marked contrast to the flat - almost televisual - look of the later version. The biggest puzzle is why this delight is buried away and barely mentioned on the packaging of the DVD.

Both films are worth watching - just make sure you watch fifties version first and then follow up with the sharper version from the thirties.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In any format it's a genre highlight., 9 Jan. 2012
By 
Spike Owen "John Rouse Merriott Chard" (Birmingham, England.) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: House Of Wax [DVD] [1953] (DVD)
Henry Jarrod is a very talented sculptor of wax figures for a museum. But as the museum starts to flounder, Jarrod's partner, Matthew Burke, insists on taking a new direction, a row ensues and Jarrod is knocked unconscious. Burke seizes the opportunity to torch the museum and get the insurance money, with Jarrod still in the premises. Thought long since dead, Jarrod resurfaces, apparently wheel chair bound and with horribly burned hands. Opening up a new museum, his new figures {made by his protégé under his instruction} look ever more lifelike than before, could he be responsible for some despicable crimes in the area?.

This marvellous film is a remake of the 1933 chiller, The Mystery Of The Wax Museum, directed by Michael Curtiz. Here this film is taken on by Andre de Toth, originally filmed in 3-D with the then bonus addition of Warner Phonic Sound, it's a picture that thankfully holds up real well even in its basic flat format. The reason it does hold up well is because director de Toth didn't get carried away with the gimmick, it's used sparingly so the narrative never gets lost amongst any trickery, and thus House Of Wax's excellently creepy story comes to the fore.

Having the ever supreme Vincent Price as your leading man {Jarrod} will always help your horror genre picture, here he two folds the performance brilliantly. At first his Jarrod is charming and carrying a grace about his dedication to his craft, but then, devilment takes control as Price pumps creepy ardour into Jarrod's fractured mind. Quite a turn from Price who most definitely suffered for his art during the shoot, forced to do his own stunts {the 3D process needs more than one camera}, he was involved in an accident that set him on fire and almost saw him crushed!. Then there was the long and often painful make up sessions to get the desired effects of a burns victim, layers of rubber strangling his skin to the point of passing out, oh yes Vincent earned his money on this one!.

We even get one of the earliest credited performances from Charles Bronson {here under his real name of Buchinsky} as Jarrod's assistant Igor, whilst fans of The Addams Family TV series will no doubt enjoy the performance of future Mortica, Carolyn Jones. The film was a big success on its release, and hugely popular with critics, and it's not hard to see why, because today it still stands proud as one of the finest exponents of classic horror, both as a story and as a technical construction. 9/10
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Price, 8 May 2003
By A Customer
From Back Cover.
In the gleefully wicked performance which made him the gothic master of the macabre, Vincent Price is Professor Henry Jarrod, a renowned wax sculptor plunged into insanity when an arsonist destroys his life's work. Unable to use his flame-scarred hands, he comes up with a new way of restocking his House Of Wax. Aided by Igor (Charles Bronson), he dips his hapless victims in wax!
Jarrod's new creations are widely praised, but a lone voice cries murder. When the dauntless Sue Allen discovers a wax figure strongly resemling a missing friend (Carolyn Jones, later immortalised as Morticia in The Addams Family), Jarrod decides to line up the very same fate for her! It's anyone's guess who will end up in the bubbling cauldron, but that doesn't lessen the sweat dread and sheer fun of this all-time classic.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 3D versions on Blu Ray Please..., 18 April 2012
By 
David Wicks (Gosford, Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Would love to see 3D versions of House of Wax released through authentic channels... plus other Warner 3D offerings including Dial M for Murder and Phantom of the Rue Morgue. Then, of course, there's Universal's Creature from the Black Lagoon and Revenge of the Creature, plus It Came From Outer Space.
The technology is there, guys, and the public has dollars ready...
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3.0 out of 5 stars A Vat of Hot Wax to Kill and to Perpetuate Beauty Is What the Heroine Barely Avoids, 6 Jan. 2015
By 
Gerald Parker "Gerald Parker" (Rouyn-Noranda, QC., Dominion of Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: House Of Wax [DVD] [1953] (DVD)
What a contrast there is between the two cinematic accounts of this tale of horror and gore! "Mystery of the Wax Museum" is the earlier of the two, from 1933, set in the "roaring '20s" then moving onwards to the "flirty '30s", is faster moving, racier, and more light-hearted, a tale of a sassy gal reporter as much as, or more, than a tale of the macabre. Fay Wray, of gorilla-hugging fame in R.K.O. Studios' "King Kong", is the lass whose life the mad sculptor of wax and of human flesh (acted by Lionel Atwill) cuts short to become the corpse which the "artist" and his apprentices wax for the Joan of Arc exhibit in the infamous museum, but it is Glenda Farrell who plays the delectable part of the girl reporter! The 1933 film moves along at a lively clip and is, well, even a bit frantically paced, and a lot of fun.

The 1953 film, for its part titled "House of Wax", set in Edwardian times and starring Vincent Price, is the one that scared all of my childhood friends witless who went to see it, back then, for fifty cents admission or so, but for which I, turning ten years old that year, did not have the admission money (the Saturday kiddies' matinée of those times, usually only asking twenty-five cents admission for more ordinary triple bills of three movies, news reels, and cartoons, a 3-D film costing twice as much). Atwill and Price both are lugubrious characters, but, alas, so are too many of the other members of the later cast, making the 1953 film, even if only compared to the 1933 effort, a rather blandly genteel cinematic outing.

Both films look good as Warner Home Video's double-sided DVD. the two movies backing each other on the disc (bearing catalogue number 11054 for the North American edition viewed). The 1933 b&w film has been colourised in somewhat pastel tones, thankfully, rather than in more garish ones. The 1953 movie was made in vivid colour and is well processed as released here. It is fun to revisit these two classics of their genre, especially the earlier of them!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Two great horrors for the price of one, 5 Aug. 2010
By 
Mr. Jonathon T. Beckett "vampire lover" (Dracula's Crypt) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: House Of Wax [DVD] [1953] (DVD)
These two horrors, the original 'Mystery Of The Wax Museum' and its remake 'House Of Wax', are both very enjoyable in their own right. The former, inexplicably not mentioned on the front cover of this release and therefore a real unexpected treat for whoever purchases this dvd, has the big bonus of a real barnstormer of a performance from Glenda Farrell as tough, wisecracking reporter Florence Dempsey, who gets her story and then some. Lionel Atwill, a great forgotten horror actor from the silver screen whose career was blighted by a sex scandal, is excellent as crippled sculptor Ivan Igor. Mind you, Vincent Price is equally as good in the remake. The main diffrence between the two adaptations is that they are set in diffrent eras, Mystery Of The Wax Museum in the 1930's, House Of Wax a generation earlier, at the cusp of the Twentieth Century. House Of Wax also had the added gimmick of being a 3D release, though this dvd is strictly two dimensional. Also watch for a young Charles Bronson in the remake as deaf mute Igor,in the credits as Charles Buchinsky, his real name.
One thing is for sure, and that's you can't go wrong by buying this, as you get two decent if not awe inspiring horror films for under three quid. That's exceptional value for money, and makes this an essential purchase for the horror film fan. 5 out of 5
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For the Record ... Region Free go ahead & enjoy!, 15 Mar. 2014
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This review is from: House of Wax [Blu-ray] [1953] [US Import] (Blu-ray)
For those a bit unsure, as the official description does say US region, i can add my voice to confirm this Blu-ray is totally Region-Free. So if you can't wait for the UK release, whenever that is, don't be afraid to import in, as it'll work. Great extras, great 3D film too. Enjoy!
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House of Wax [Blu-ray] [1953] [US Import]
House of Wax [Blu-ray] [1953] [US Import] by House of Wax (Blu-ray - 2013)
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