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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Different and brilliant
I've followed the blog that is behind this book for a few years after coming across it looking for some vaguely Middle Eastern recipe.

Since then I have made many of the dishes that Bethany has featured on her site - and they have always been delicious.

I knew nothing about this type of cuisine but I gather that her recipes mix the traditional Middle...
Published 23 months ago by Mr Ian Clifford

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars Not great
Unknown ingredients and too much of them, few explanation, recipes r boring
Published 1 month ago by hana bar


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good!, 25 July 2013
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Just received this today. Really good book with lovely recipes and detailed explanation of the various sauces, spices mixes, pickles, etc. to get you going. I have Ottolenghi's Jerusalem; along with this book, I think I'm pretty much sorted for Middle Eastern and North African cooking!
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A choice collection of (fairly) authentic recipes, 11 July 2013
By 
E. L. Wisty "World Domination League" (Devon, UK) - See all my reviews
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The time has perhaps not yet come for Middle Eastern cuisine to go mainstream. We're still waiting for some celebrity chef to do a television series in order to popularise it. In the meantime while we wait, there continue to be published plenty of cookbooks.

This new offering by Bethany Kehdy spans a geographical region from Morocco to Iran, and the recipes are mostly based on authentic recipes, with relatively few outlandish new concoctions, though Ms Kehdy does often introduce her own variation on the original whilst remaining reasonably true to the spirit of the dish. So for example with fesenjan (which she simply calls "braised duck legs" - she seems afraid to use the original Arabic or Farsi name in recipe titles, instead either using more familiar terms from Western style dishes or trying to be clever with quirky soubriquets) the pomegranate and walnut sauce in which the duck would usually be cooked becomes a kind of 'chutney' to be served alongside.

There is relatively little in the way of hard to source ingredients in you are in range of a town with 'ethnic' grocers. Even if not, most things should be available by mail order at a push (there are a few listings at the back). Alternatives are substituted or suggested for the most difficult to find items.

Each recipe gives number of servings, preparation time & cooking time. Ingredient lists are given in both metric and imperial. The cooking instructions are well presented in clear steps. Every recipe gets a page to itself (the odd one spanning two, but these are on opposing pages rather than having to turn the page over - nice one from the book designers - they've clearly been thinking, unlike some other cookbook designers), and three out of five of the recipes have a colour photograph of the finished article on the opposing page. I would have liked a photo for everything, but it seems rare to find that luxury in cookbook land. Thankfully there are no filler photos of Middle Eastern locations nor of the grinning author which are the bane of so many cookbooks.

There are a few introductory pages about Ms Kehdy's own culinary background and about Middle Eastern food in general, and at the back there are a number of pages of standard recipes for spice mixes, accompaniments and so on referenced in the main text.

From my own viewpoint, already possessing no end of Middle Eastern cookbooks, there's not really a great deal in here which is new to me, but for newcomers this provides a great introduction to the kind of food to be found across a broad stretch of territory from Tangier to Tehran, not necessarily entirely authentic but very much retaining the essence.

The full recipe listing is as follows:

Mezze:
Silky chickpea & lamb soup
Kishk, lamb & kale soup
Spiced naked mini sausages
Eggs poached in tomato and pepper stew
Kafta snugged scotch eggs
Minced lamb & onion crescents (sambousek)
Whipped hummus with lamb
Lamb & bulgur torpedoes (kibbeh)
Venison & sour cherry nests
Tuna tartare with chermoula
Artichokes with couscous
Mixed greens frittata (kookoo sabzi)
Spinach and sumac turnovers
Dynamite chilli cigars (briwat/raqaqat)
Red-hot roasties (batata harra)
Shipwrecked potato boats
Corn on the kobab
Jewelled rice (morasa polow)
Carrot salad with cumin and preserved lemon
Monk's aubergine salad (baba ghanouj/salatet el raheb)
Courgette and sumac fritters
Warm hummus in a cumin and olive oil broth
Swimming chickpeas (hummus musabaha)
Chargrilled sweet pepper and walnut dip (muhammara)
Smokey aubergine dip (baba ghanoush)
Spinach & labneh dip
Tabbouleh salad
Fattoush salad
Shaved beetroot, radish and grapefruit salad
Pomegranate & cucumber salad
Yoghurt, cucumber & mint salad
Undressed herb salad
Moroccan citrus salad

Poultry:
Chicken basteeya
Sumac scented chicken parcels
Slumbering chamomile chicken
Wild thyme chicken
Sumac chicken casserole
Chicken & spinach upside down cake
Chicken with caraway couscous
Chicken and preserved lemon tagine
Jew's mallow with cardamom chicken
Chicken stuffed with cherries
Mandaean duck stuffed with nutty ginger rice with date & apple compote
Duck shawarma with fig jam
Braised duck legs (fesenjan)

Meat:
Chickpea flour quiche
Aubergine-wrapped fingers
Leafy lamb kebabs
Caramelized onions stuffed with lamb
Baked kafta
Herbed kafta with dukkah tahini
Spiced lamb flatbread pizzas (lahmacun)
Lamb rice with crispy potato base
Freekah with lamb & rhubarb
Auntie Anwaar's mansaf risotto
Meaty ratatouille
Lamb & herb stew (ghormeh e-sabzi)
Baked spiced lamb tortellini
Quinces stuffed with veal and wheat berries
Aubergine veal and yoghurt crumble
Veal shoulder with butter beans
Oxtail with oozing okra

Seafood:
Almond crusted scallops
Mussels in arak
Slow braised spiced squid
Prawn, spinach and bread crumble
Spiced prawn and coconut rice
Sea bass with spiced caramalized onion rice
Veiled sea bass with a spicy surprise
Salmon with herby butter and barberries
Tamarind & herb mackerel stew
Spicy snapper in the Tripoli manner
Blackened sea bream
Monkfish tagine with chermoula

Vegetarian:
Pan-fried squares
Falafel & tarator wraps
Sabich salad
Koshari
Lentil, bulgur & tamarind pilaf
Upside-down cauliflower rice cake
Courgettes stuffed with herb rice
Vine leaves with bulgur, figs & nuts
Broad beans with yoghurt tahdeg
Mixed bean & herb noodle soup
Broad beans, peas & fennel tagine
Slow-cooked broad bean and tomato stew
Smokey aubergine & split pea stew
Mess of pottage
Teta's smokey musaq'a

Desserts:
Semolina pancakes
Fruit cocktail with clotted cream and nuts
Lebanese clotted cream with dulche de leche and caramelized bananas
Pomegranate & rose quark summer cake
Evaporated milk pudding with crushed Arabic coffee
Middle Eastern cheesecake
Fritter threads with mulberry swirl ice cream
Saffron rice pudding
Cardamom scented profiteroles
Tahini & chocolate brioche
Egyptian spiced bread pudding
Wild orchid ice-cream in filo cups
Ginger & molasses semolina marble cake
Baklawa
Ma'amoul shortbread biscuits
Date fudge
Date & tahini truffles
Turkish delight
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bad shipping packaging-great book, 28 Feb. 2015
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Every recipe has a photo and the recipes are well written. Explanations in back describe spices and cooking methods. Just what I needed to put a variation on cooking as it's easy to just keep making the same things.
Now, as to the shipping: I wasn't able to leave feedback for the method of packaging. I live in the states and didn't want to go thru the trouble of sending this back to exchange as it arrived water damaged. I could see the parcel had gotten wet and on closer look, could see that the book have gotten damp and the pages had that crunchy sound and some were sticking together. The photos were okay and the cover was okay, so I just let it go.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, 22 Mar. 2014
Me being Moroccan and having lived in the Middle East before, I just love this book. I recognize most of the recipes there and I love the little twists..It's nice to have
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Recipes..., 11 Nov. 2013
This review is from: The Jewelled Kitchen: A Stunning Collection of Lebanese, Moroccan and Persian Recipes (Kindle Edition)
I thought I'd treat my Kindle library to a new cookbook, and went for this as this type of cuisine is close to home in terms of my background. It's a lovely book, however there are many recipes that do not have accompanying pictures. This is very important to me as I like to have an idea as to what the end result should look like. I'm debating whether to return this and get a hard back copy instead.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Traditional Middle Eastern recipes with modern flair, 18 July 2013
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I've relied on some favourite Middle Eastern cookbooks by authors such as Claudia RodenA New Book of Middle Eastern Food (Cookery Library) and Anissa HelouModern Mezze for many years. New books often seem to be written from an outsider's point of view without an in-depth knowledge of the cooking processes that are used and why they are used to create certain textures and flavours. The Jewelled Kitchen is different - with some beautiful photography and well considered layout it combines a contemporary feel with tradition ...indicative of the recipes inside.
The recipes are from Lebanon, Iraq and the wider Middle East. Some are lengthy, some very simple, but even when there is a modern twist added they remain authentic to the culture they originated from. The instructions are extremely thorough. It's the first cookbook to open the door into Middle Eastern kitchens for a long time.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Middle Eastern cookbook to have and cook from, 30 July 2013
Although I photographed this book and might sound biased for that reason I can honestly say it's a book to have if you want to learn about Middle Eastern cuisine. Written with passion and pure devotion, backed up by deep knowledge this book will take you on a journey through out the region, exploring spices, flavours and techniques of authentic and traditional recipes, some of them with a modern twist.

I tested many of the recipes (some of them many times) before the book was published, but now when I finally have my own copy, I continue discovering wonders of the cuisine with a child-like excitement. It's really hard to pick a favourite recipe. Stuffed squid, kishk soup, venison and sour cherry nests, tuna tartare with chermoula, dynamite chilli cigars, meaty ratatouille or teta's smokey musaqa'a are just a few to mention. Every time I cook from the book my list of favourites expands. My latest addition is Sea bass with spiced caramelised onion rice. Even my boyfriend who doesn't like spices like cinnamon and allspice is savoury dishes devoured the rice and went for seconds. What I really appreciate about this book is that the recipes are easy to follow and they work! If you want to impress your friends or family with new flavours and delicious Middle Eastern food, this book should be on your bookshelf.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great illustrations and simple tasty food, 31 Dec. 2013
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I love this cookbook. The illustrations are fabulous and colour rich, it is a feast for the eyes. There are so ingredients which are not going to be found in your average food store, however not a lot of searching will find all the parts for you. Some of the more simple recipes are in fact some of the more tasty dishes. A nice supplementary book to Ottolenghi's Jerusalem.
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5.0 out of 5 stars been looking for a good book on Middle east Cooking, 11 July 2014
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This review is from: The Jewelled Kitchen: A Stunning Collection of Lebanese, Moroccan and Persian Recipes (Kindle Edition)
I have, for some time now, been looking for a good book on Middle east Cooking. This is the one! It has some lovely recipes and is easy to follow.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A delight!, 20 May 2014
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This review is from: The Jewelled Kitchen: A Stunning Collection of Lebanese, Moroccan and Persian Recipes (Kindle Edition)
This is a wonderful cookery book. It fits very well onto my phablet and I can view it and see every word. The recipes look delicious and there are links to other recipes should they be needed with certain dishes, so, jolly useful!
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