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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Branding and product positioning
I found this to be interesting and informative particularly for a reader who may not be a total petrol-head. It describes the challenges of branding and product positioning well.
Published 13 months ago by JO

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Easy read
not a bad overview of the journey took my Jaguar Land rover with some simple messages which translate across different business sectors
Published 7 months ago by Alan Price


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Branding and product positioning, 15 July 2013
I found this to be interesting and informative particularly for a reader who may not be a total petrol-head. It describes the challenges of branding and product positioning well.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good to be Bad !, 30 May 2014
By 
Duncurin (Manchester) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
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I quite like the way the Jaguar advertisement campaign has harnessed the current Hollywood penchant for casting the baddy in just about every film (even those without Mel Gibson in!) as the English chap with the ‘plummy’ English accent.

This book is not a bad read about the Tata transformation of a British automobile icon and how they painstakingly restored it to its rightful place amongst the panoply of car making greats. Though it’s a worthy read and I can wholeheartedly recommend it – I have to say that it just lacked a little passion and this is a shame, as I feel there is much here to be passionate about.

The clue comes as far in as page 175 – the first paragraph where “the British don’t always recognise their assets” and “Britishness was a positive marketing proposition”. This is a shame, as my Dad who was not born an Englishman always bough British cars and I remember the day his 3.8 S-Type in ‘silver opalescent blue’ was delivered. I was a little boy at the time and was off school with an illness. The man delivered the car and my dad asked me to come with him for a drive. The slight ticking as the fuel pumps cut in. My Dad would always insist on waiting until the ticking had stopped before he fired the engine. The twin fuel tanks; on a long run he’d flick the little switch and the nice gauge would re-calibrate for the fresh tank; and the air vent that would rise just in front of the windscreen – presumably when the engine was hot. The gorgeous purring engine, which I assume was a straight six.

More important than all those things, however, was the look on people’s faces as we swept by and that look was understood, as this book makes clear, not so much by the English, for it seems we are almost apologetic these days, cowed by people who are much more trendy, have a louder voice or a bigger film budget! and are more magnificent than we could ever hope to be – but by the Indians, who took what was there and nourished it back to its rightful place. Though the book dutifully reports what was done and something of how; it has failed to capture the essence that those in Tata understood, as much as my Dad did.

For, those admiring looks went up into another level of magnitude when the E-type was released and those who understand its beauty like a Spitfire weaving a trail over Kent countryside will know that suddenly being bad is not such a terrible place to be. In any event JLR is back and long may that be so.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The story of jaguar land rovers renewed success under Tatar, 7 Aug 2013
Gives a. Brief history of jaguar and la drovers beginning the covers the different owners of the companies. BMW ford in some depth also. Covering from bl to British aerospace. Seemed a. Good objective book well written and easy to read having a more professional feel than many car books.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good summary of the current company, 4 Sep 2013
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This review is from: Jewels in the Crown: How Tata of India transformed Britain's Jaguar and Land Rover (Kindle Edition)
A suprisingly readable book, which does a good job of covering the complicated history of the many compaines involved in the story without getting bogged down with unnecessary detail, but remaining informative to the core.

Would recommend to anyone looking to get a good grasp on the make up of mordern car company, and what was required to get it there.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A new era, 25 May 2014
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This book was given to me by a fellow Jaguar enthusiast and made for very interesting reading. With an extensive background in automotive journalism, and a former Editor-in-Chief of ‘Autocar’ magazine, Hutton is well placed to tell the story of the turbulence that beset Jaguar and Land Rover since the British Leyland days and set their current and future positions in the light of the international market and against much larger and more well-established competitors in the ‘premium’ sector, such as BMW and Mercedes.

I don’t normally read business-centred books on automotive subjects but this was easy to read, not remotely ‘dry’, and it delivered valuable insight into the realities that a modern vehicle manufacturer must face if it is to stay alive in an increasingly competitive, global and environmentally aware market. I was particularly interested by developments in expanding manufacture of the Jaguar/Land Rover (JLR) group’s vehicles in various locations around the world such as China, India and Brazil, whilst the group continues to strengthen its presence in the UK and of how vital this is. Hutton writes with authority on JLR’s engines their origins and applications and, again interestingly, the view of hybrid power being the future for luxury vehicles. I had also not fully appreciated, until reading this book, how much JLR’s recent renaissance was due to the vision and enthusiasm of Ratan Tata, the Chairman of his family’s company at the time of the takeover, and the wisdom of those in the Tata organisation to appoint and support the right people and let them get on with things.

A very good read for those who have an interest in these two iconic marques or in the modern British motor industry.
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5.0 out of 5 stars good read, 5 May 2014
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This review is from: Jewels in the Crown: How Tata of India transformed Britain's Jaguar and Land Rover (Kindle Edition)
A very good consise document well set out, an enjoyable worth while read, although I still prefer the book in my hand, rather than kindle on a laptop.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This Book Is A Jewel too for Jaguar/Rover Enthusiasts., 15 April 2014
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This review is from: Jewels in the Crown: How Tata of India transformed Britain's Jaguar and Land Rover (Kindle Edition)
As a retired Jaguar trained apprentice working in a garage that were agents for both Jaguar and Rover way back in the sixties and seventies when the E-type, MkX , Mk 2 and XJ6 were the cars to have. I am naturally interested in both the past and future of these companies. The author is very obviously a very knowledgeable man within the motor industry and gives a very comprehensive account of JLR through its acquisition by Tata more or less up to this day but he also goes back and touches on the bad old British Leyland days and on to the pathway through Ford and BMW that these marques took. As a Jaguar nut I have read many good books on the car and this is another very good one to add to the collection.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Worth a read, 20 Mar 2014
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The book was very up to date for a fast moving industry. The author knows the ins and outs of the JLR group and made the book informative & interesting.
I've subsequently lent the book to another person it was that good.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Easy read, 7 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Jewels in the Crown: How Tata of India transformed Britain's Jaguar and Land Rover (Kindle Edition)
not a bad overview of the journey took my Jaguar Land rover with some simple messages which translate across different business sectors
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting and insightful., 2 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Jewels in the Crown: How Tata of India transformed Britain's Jaguar and Land Rover (Kindle Edition)
I bought this book asca Land Rover fan, and was interested in the history of ownership over the last 60-odd years. It's more management and financial, rather than technical, but gives a really good impression of how challenging the global auto industry is.
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