Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
16
4.3 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 30 December 2013
A beautiful satirical examination of the criminal justice system as it works in practice. I'd cheerfully recommend this to anybody working in the legal profession, law students and those looking for a quick read that'll have you howling. I'd love to read more of Mr Bigg-Wigg's work.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 April 2015
As a jury foreman once I found this hilarious. The only point missed was in my trial the crown counsel conveniently had the antecedent sheet at the back of his notes as he addressed the jury thus informing us that the thug on trial was just that - a thug. Everything else was as is including the police evidence which was detailed and suitably vague as required as the accused was detained whilst resisting arrest.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 September 2015
Snide and contemptuous, this is a nasty book. The author ridicules judges, court officers, the police, defendants and juries coming across as an intellectual bully happy to slap justice about to achieve immoral even unethical ends. Perhaps it does highlight a couple of points though. The balance of equity in English law is not right. The writer makes it quite clear that on occasion defendants he knows in his own mind absolutely to be guilty are set free not because they are innocent but because their barrister has found something incorrect in the prosecution evidence that he ( or she) can manipulate to hide or rule inadmissable evidence that would convict their client. In English Law, two wrongs can result in a not guilty verdict. The first wrong is the crime itself, the second wrong is a witness who demonstrably lies or a lawyer who can bully a witness into confusion and apparent contradiction. Perhaps contempt of court (as this book is) should be strengthened so that noone neither an advocate nor a solicitor, neither a police officer nor a court officer not even a judge is "above the law". The author of this seems to believe he is. Shame on him.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 October 2014
Essential reading for anyone interested in advocacy. The author writes with wit, humour and truth. Fantastically entertaining and had me giggling
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 October 2014
Started off with a bit of tongue-in-cheek humour which was ok. Then got boring and just about knocked everything/everyone connected to the legal process.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 December 2014
Entertaining, informative and engaging. Once you start reading you cannot put the book down. You wAnt to know how he describes what happens next.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 March 2016
A really good jargon free read. It takes a criminal case study from start to end with a cleverly light hearted approach from the author.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 March 2016
A brilliant look into Advocacy. Giving you a good look at the components of a working life of a barrister and of the court.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 August 2014
Great book, definately worth a read. It was so difficult to get hold off but found it on here.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 August 2014
Hilarious. Wonderfully written and dry.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse