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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magical
Delightful characters in a wonderful mix (or rather, interface) of the ordinary and extraordinary.

Young Lilly lives in a normal house in Oxford, attends school (fairly regularly), and has spaniels, friends, romance, bereavement, marmalade sandwiches and lots of cakes. And (whilst Dad's not about), a Mum and Gran who matter of factly teach her Latin, botany,...
Published 14 months ago by chriskeppie

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Good book
An enjoyable book for all ages, totally enjoyed reading this story and look forward to reading more of these books
Published 2 months ago by Stephanie Bradley


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magical, 14 July 2013
This review is from: Paradox Child Book One: Re-edited version by the marvellous Mr Chris Keppie (Paradox Child Series 1) (Kindle Edition)
Delightful characters in a wonderful mix (or rather, interface) of the ordinary and extraordinary.

Young Lilly lives in a normal house in Oxford, attends school (fairly regularly), and has spaniels, friends, romance, bereavement, marmalade sandwiches and lots of cakes. And (whilst Dad's not about), a Mum and Gran who matter of factly teach her Latin, botany, and spells! Oh yes, and how to time travel..

Chapter divisions cleverly move the story along, introducing enchanting nuggets of history, anthropology, philosophy, science, art, stories and cultures from around Britain and the world, whilst also endlessly playing with that juxtaposition of mundanity and magic. It's something else! Jane Yates clearly brings much first hand knowledge and love to this debut book - children, Oxford and its wonderful museums, art, gardening, curiosities, alternative ways and understandings, etc - and this writing from the heart, as well as the head, helps make the story so very gripping.

In her biography, Yates describes herself as 'dreamer and dyslexic', which perhaps explains why some idiosyncratic spelling and punctuation still made it through editing. Yet these symptoms of the latter description are rendered entirely irrelevant by the former - she has dared to dream in taking on the huge challenge of expressing herself in fiction (as well as art which has come more naturally to her previously), and this is hugely inspirational in many ways. Her combination of simple everyday prose and structure, with some exquisite stories and phrases ('the sky was the colour of pain's grey'), beautifully mirrors the story's play between the mundane here and now, and the magical other.

I've loved reading this book, and found the conclusion both satisfying in itself, whilst also lending itself to the exciting possibility of sequels. I'd highly recommend Paradox Child to readers both young and old, and congratulate Jane Yates on a fantastic first novel.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Childhood Story, 27 Aug 2014
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This review is from: Paradox Child Book One: Re-edited version by the marvellous Mr Chris Keppie (Paradox Child Series 1) (Kindle Edition)
I wish this book had been around when I was a kid; I would've loved it so much! The world is richly imagined with beautiful world-building so that it feels lush and fully realized. There's a small romance, but that aspect is kept very light due to the character's age and I think that works well for the book. I love that the author focuses on Lilly's relationships with her mother, grandmother and friends instead of trying to build an all-consuming romance like so many young adult books do, because it was so much more true to life for a girl of that age. I especially appreciate that Lilly had girlfriends her own age and formed meaningful friendships!

The only minor complaint I have is that Lilly's emotional reactions are not always explored, but I can understand if that is deliberate on the part of the author in order to facilitate discussion between the book's young readers and their parents. I could certainly understand how a parent reading this book with a younger child would want to stop the book and talk out the emotional points in the book, so I can definitely see why the author would choose to downplay Lilly's emotional reactions.

I loved that the book ended on a hopeful note, and I hope that the mysteries brought up in this book will be answered in the next two books. The unanswered questions will definitely have you grabbing the second book right away! I feel kinda bad that I got this book for free because I really enjoyed it and am looking forward to the next books in the series!

*Also, how inspiring is it that the author is dyslexic!? I'm gobsmacked! Well done, J. Yates!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful and enjoyable tale, 3 July 2013
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This review is from: Paradox Child Book One: Re-edited version by the marvellous Mr Chris Keppie (Paradox Child Series 1) (Kindle Edition)
Time travel is the focus of Jane Yates' debut novel, Paradox Child. The child in question is twelve-year-old Lilly, a slightly shy girl with a delightfully inquisitive mind and a pretty unconventional family. Whilst a lot of eighties kids might have spent their time playing Hungry Hungry Hippos or watching The A-Team, Lilly is more concerned with practicing the art of magic with her mother and grandmother. But when her mother fails to return from one of her mysterious excursions, it's up to Lilly to put her skills into action and track her down.

Unfortunately for Lilly, however, her mother hasn't just got lost down the shops, she's lost in time. Luckily, Lilly's grandmother (one of the book's most beautifully-written characters) knows a thing or three about a machine which, when combined with magical expertise, can transport Lilly through the ages in order to locate her mother.

The machine is housed at the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford (an institution the author is familiar with) and Lilly's Grandmother slowly reveals the history behind the machine's creation to her Granddaughter. It's these fascinating nuggets which are perhaps the major highlight of the book, especially considering Lilly's Grandmother explains the machines conception in the context of Pitt Rivers' extraordinary life.

The book is written in an engrossing style, with simple, lyrical writing and gorgeous, childlike observations. For example, at one point Lilly notes how herons remind her of dinosaurs. However, the plot, with its references to quantum physics and numerous threads, is a fairly complicated one. But, thanks to Yates' skill as a storyteller, this combination does work creating a rare book which bridges the gap between children's stories and YA fiction.

In summary, a delightful tale which any child will hungrily devour in next to no time.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Character and plot, 1 July 2013
This review is from: Paradox Child Book One: Re-edited version by the marvellous Mr Chris Keppie (Paradox Child Series 1) (Kindle Edition)
This book draws you in to the story of an odd family, just a daughter, Lilly, a mother, Rose, and a gran, Iris, with special powers and secrets. When the mother goes missing, Iris has to tell Lilly all the things she wasn't supposed to know until she was older, and Lilly has to go on a dangerous mission to save her mother.

Once the background to the story is all told and you get to the action, it carries you along with energy and a helluva lot of ideas from physics, archaeology, witchcraft and herbalism. It's a wonderful blend and it all comes together quite amazingly at the end, setting up for a sequel at the same time.

A very skilful debut and I can't wait for the next in the series!

P.S. I know I'm down as an editor on this book, but I only checked for typos!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Good Read, 21 July 2014
This review is from: Paradox Child Book One: Re-edited version by the marvellous Mr Chris Keppie (Paradox Child Series 1) (Kindle Edition)
The Paradox Child series covers the YA genre, reaching into time travel, steampunk, magic, therianthropy, and romance. These are well-written books from an author who has had to overcome many obstacles while enduring challenges most of us never face as writers. For those of you who are not familiar with Jane Yates, she is severely dyslexic.

But Jane is also an overcomer, refusing to stand on the sidelines simply because of a learning disability. She’s a natural writer. Writers need to write, whether dyslexic or not. With the help of a trusted editor, Yates has crafted a strong work.

Paradox Child tells the story of a peculiar family consisting of a girl named Lilly, her mother Rose, and grandmother Iris. The mother vanishes, leaving Iris to divulge secrets Lilly, at her young age, isn’t quite ready to learn. The cast of characters takes readers on a journey fueled by shape-shifting, time travel, witchcraft, magic, and history.

Sure, there are some issues with the wording in parts of this story; but given the author’s disability, this is one to be celebrated rather than picked apart. I recommend it to anybody looking for a good story.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A warm and magical tale - posted by @RosemaryAJohns, 13 Sep 2014
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This review is from: Paradox Child Book One: Re-edited version by the marvellous Mr Chris Keppie (Paradox Child Series 1) (Kindle Edition)
Paradox Child by JANE YATES is the first in a trilogy of novels for teens and YA set in Oxford and the Pitt Rivers which explore time travel. It begins on Halloween when 12-year-old Lilly is enjoying casting spells with her mum and gran who are steeped in magical traditions. Later, when her gran has a mini-stroke, Lilly is left by herself to care for her. Lilly struggles to cover up her mum’s unexpected absence and cope with her gran’s needs but gradually also discovers the exciting reason for her mum’s disappearance: she’s stuck in time. The time machine itself is hidden at the Pitt Rivers. This sets in motion a rescue journey on a full moon and new friendships but also plunges Lilly into a world where not everyone is good, ghosts haunt children’s sleep and time travel can’t fix everything…
This is a warm and compassionate tale of three generations of women which deals with themes of family, friendship and grief. It particularly focuses on the bonds between the girls. It deftly approaches subjects of time travel, science, history and the supernatural in an intelligent but accessible way.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unbelievablyinteresting, 28 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Paradox Child Book One: Re-edited version by the marvellous Mr Chris Keppie (Paradox Child Series 1) (Kindle Edition)
I really liked this book because it is just so entertaining and informative at the same time. I have really come to love Lilly and her family and I don't know if their spells are real or imaginary, but they just work so well and seem so real, like all the Pitt rivers information (which is actually real information). i have recommended this to so many of my friends and so far they love it and I would recommend this to anyone with a need for sci-fi book with excitement and information thrown in. Loved it
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great achievement!, 23 Jan 2014
This review is from: Paradox Child Book One: Re-edited version by the marvellous Mr Chris Keppie (Paradox Child Series 1) (Kindle Edition)
The paradox child tells the story of Lily & her discovery of her families involvement in time traveling from the secret underground areas of the Pitts river museum. This would make a good read for pre-teens, the characters are interesting and the plot very easy to follow, with a mix of the extraordinary. I was able to easily put this book down and come back to it later and carry on with the plot without having to remind myself what happened previously. This is the first part of what I understand is to be a trilogy and has an interesting cliffhanger of an ending, which encourages moving on to the next book.
The book was written by Yates who herself is dyslexic, and yes there are some small spelling errors but I think this book is a great success for the author and even more so for her on a personnel level! I wish her great success in her future writing!
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good book, 5 July 2014
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This review is from: Paradox Child Book One: Re-edited version by the marvellous Mr Chris Keppie (Paradox Child Series 1) (Kindle Edition)
An enjoyable book for all ages, totally enjoyed reading this story and look forward to reading more of these books
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4.0 out of 5 stars Paradox Child, 29 Dec 2013
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This review is from: Paradox Child Book One: Re-edited version by the marvellous Mr Chris Keppie (Paradox Child Series 1) (Kindle Edition)
I downloaded this book because I enjoy time travel adventures and I am hoping one day to go to the Pitt River's museum. It was a nice story (although more a children's story) and I enjoyed it, particularly the way it related to historical characters. However this book does not really stand alone, there are too many loose ends left to be resolved in the rest of the series.
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