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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Force your self to read the first 20%, the rest is fantastic
I loved the way Will Wight has created a new and fantastic world. I thought it was a refreshing New take on magic, where it is earned through battling your way through your respective territories. The Vallinhall territory is wonderfully described, for some reason I pictured thy Nye as dementors. By defeating each room in turn, the travellers gain a new power, but they...
Published 7 months ago by M. D. Jonrs

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent start to the trilogy
The house blades is ok. It's not going to set the world on fire but at the same time it's not that bad a read either. Having read the second in the trilogy now as well. the house of blades can only be described as a good introduction that sets the tone for what's to come. I would recommend it. It's a fun read and sets up the second book perfectly.
Published 8 months ago by Jetvan2312


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent start to the trilogy, 19 Nov 2013
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This review is from: House of Blades (The Traveler's Gate Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
The house blades is ok. It's not going to set the world on fire but at the same time it's not that bad a read either. Having read the second in the trilogy now as well. the house of blades can only be described as a good introduction that sets the tone for what's to come. I would recommend it. It's a fun read and sets up the second book perfectly.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Force your self to read the first 20%, the rest is fantastic, 27 Dec 2013
By 
M. D. Jonrs (Wales) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: House of Blades (The Traveler's Gate Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
I loved the way Will Wight has created a new and fantastic world. I thought it was a refreshing New take on magic, where it is earned through battling your way through your respective territories. The Vallinhall territory is wonderfully described, for some reason I pictured thy Nye as dementors. By defeating each room in turn, the travellers gain a new power, but they can't keep using these powers, they run out and need to be refilled. The fights seem a bit like top trumps, matching 1 power with another. It's a good, easy read, plenty of magic, plenty of action, a lot of sword fights and all the characters are built well. I've also just finished the second part and waiting patiently for the third, so it must be good.

BUT to get to the good stuff you have to force your way through the first 20% of the book. I very nearly discarded it as it was so slow to build, and the first proper fight scene after the villagers get taken was a bit grim. So glad that I did keep reading
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Poor start but finishes well, 13 Feb 2014
By 
Pie (West Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: House of Blades (The Traveler's Gate Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
I was close to giving it 3 stars but gave it 4 because it got better the further you read. The other way round would have felt more disappointing.

I have to say i struggled with the first half of the book, not because it was complicated or difficult to understand, but because it doesn't flow. It's a bit jumpy here and there and leaves a lot unexplained. A bit like this review!

I stuck with it because the plot is different to your usual kid gets told he's "the one" and grows up all mighty and powerful to do a bit of baddie bashing! There is that kid in this book but he's not the main character. The main character has to do things the hard way if he wants to be a hero!

I read the second half of the book in half the time it took to read the first. The characters came more alive, the book flowed a little more and as all first books of a trilogy must do, the ending made me buy the second book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars combines some great original concepts with some of the worst derivate writing ive seen in ages, 22 April 2014
By 
D. J. Ketchin "living in books" (Edinburgh Uk) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: House of Blades (The Traveler's Gate Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
This revenge story suffers fails to convince.

The normal revenge driven story has the main character suffer as he builds his skills over time. Forged in a crucible the innocent becomes tempered steel.

This seems to be a computer game concept approach to fantasy. The main character encounters an extra dimensional world designed to level up the protagonist as he faces many challenges. Nothing wrong with this concept - but the approach feels very mechanical - and while there is plenty of lingering on the extradimenional world - the main character seems to be missing a few dimensions of his own.

The two main supporting characters are particularly wooden and one dimensional. One of the few truly great points is the climatic battle with a very understandable and interesting bad guy, who is far more believeable than any of the other characters in the book. Unfortunately leaves me rooting for the wrong side.

There are a few plot related points that are nice - the desire to save a damsel in distress who really, really doesnt want or need it. Its a nice subversion of the usual fantasy trope.

The series may develop quite well , but seems at this point to be confused as to what audience its aiming at. Mature readers looking for an interesting deviaton from the conventions of fantasy or teen readers looking for an unchallenging read.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a hidden gem, 5 Aug 2013
By 
Val Kyrie (West Yorkshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: House of Blades (The Traveler's Gate Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
I came across this novel through the recommendations listed on a previous purchase and decided to give it a chance, despite the sample text size being bigger than usual, and the narrative immediately engaged me. There was just something enthralling about the perspective of Simon which made me care about his survival, even though he was not coming across as the sort of protagonist we instantly sense will somehow be great. Compared to someone like Kvoethe from "The Name of the Wind", whose brilliance we glimpse at an early stage, the mettle we expect from Simon is a long time coming. Unlike Kvoethe, Simon's parents are not conveniently killed, enabling him to move on with his life unfettered; instead, he is saddled with looking after his mother after the tragic events which unfold in the opening chapter, and because of this, he is not as strong or daring as he should be by the time soldiers sent by Overlord Malachi visit his village Myria with the intention of gathering the annual sacrifice.

Rather than Simon saving the village with an old sword he barely gets to practise with, it is his childhood friend and rival Alin who manages to confront the soldiers and their Traveller Cormac with a sudden burst of magic. Not only that, but even the one girl Simon likes has more courage and authority than he does in a village burning down. Ashamed to discover his weaknesses, Simon returns to Latari Forest, the location of his parents' demise and the place where he last saw the Traveller who helped him long ago, to request the Traveller's tutelage. Kai, a quizzical swordsman with a seven-foot blade, encounters Simon first and takes up the challenge of training the boy as a fully fledged Traveller. Of course, not everything is straight forward under Kai's enigmatic guidance - it takes everything Simon has to survive and figure things out in the territory known as "Valinhall". Eventually, Simon proves himself to such an extent that he is granted some powers, but there is more to things than just rescuing the village from some annual sacrifice. There is a prophecy claiming that a Traveller from Elysia will appear, and Leah, the one girl Simon likes and still wants to rescue, is much more than she seems.

Without going into further detail than that, "House of Blades" is beyond doubt a surprising and interesting debut. The author may not use high fantasy to communicate the plot or the depth of his characters, but the simplicity of description can go a long way in visually aiding the reader with vividly colourful battle scenes, as well as to make a humorous dig at the fantasy memes we all know and love, yet sometimes wish did not take themselves so seriously. I have several favourite moments where this comes into play, such as Simon climbing out of the trap door after visiting the Nye in Valinhall, the moment he catches his cloak on a weathervane, and those little instances of jealousy where Simon and Alin look at each other, thinking they are trying to out-do one another. It all serves for an enjoyable experience and a novel so engaging that you cannot put it down.

For female readers, there is something more to the girls and women who feature in this story. Naturally there are times when they will fall within the categories they're meant to, given their specific roles, but these categories by no means confine their actual independence. Leah, for example, conceals her true strength for reasons later revealed and plays along with the "maiden in distress" image being imposed by Alin and others; while Andra, a helpless little girl in Orgith Cave, turns out to have a sense of humour at the worst of times and can hold her own when required. I'm not pushing a feminist agenda here by rolling eyes at a supposed gender infraction; I am simply gratified that a shift has emerged in new fantasy fiction - it is one that implements the full humanity available to characters and allocates roles according to what each character can offer to the whole, and not because they are prescribed by the genre of fantasy.

In reading this book, I have come to respect a new generation of author and strongly anticipate the next instalment "The Crimson Vault" due out August 10, according to the author's website. The editing is good, the proofreading thorough, and the Kindle Edition offers what a professional release should (there are those who fail to even publish decent maps or neglect to index their chapters, but I shan't go into that).

All in all, I thank Will Wight from the bottom of my heart for writing such a good story.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Malazan lite?, 14 May 2014
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This review is from: House of Blades (The Traveler's Gate Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
The magic system is similar to that used in the malazan book of the fallen series with a few tweeks but apart from that it has been an enjoyable read and will be finishing off the series
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good begining, 3 May 2014
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This review is from: House of Blades (The Traveler's Gate Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
This book nicely sets up the trilogy, the characters are brilliant and there is always action in every chapter. This book is well worth reading and book 2 and 3 of the Trilogy just get better.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A solid start to a series, 17 April 2014
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This review is from: House of Blades (The Traveler's Gate Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
Will Wight introduces three very different protagonists in his debut and spins an effective fantasy world around them.

Read more at my books blog: [...]
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5.0 out of 5 stars Best buy you can make for the Ereaders, 10 April 2014
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This review is from: House of Blades (The Traveler's Gate Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
For what this, and the other books in the series cost, you really should do yourself a favour and check it out. The writing is better than most company published novels and the story and premise behind it is enough to set it apart from the crowd of other independently published books that all seem to centre on "The Chosen one". The Author has created a rich and realistic, in fantasy terms, world with believable characters that react in normal human ways to the situations they find themselves in.
I have really enjoyed this and the other books and they have easily gone into my top 5 series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fab, 27 Mar 2014
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This review is from: House of Blades (The Traveler's Gate Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
The reviews i read here before I purchased this book were absolutely correct. If you can wade through the boring first 20% of this book it gets really good, and it does. Thoroughly enjoyed it and couldn't put it down after i dragged myself through the boring beginning. Can't wait to read the next one
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