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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 21 November 2013
The final instalment of this anniversary series exhibits a writing style and structure perfect for a novella. As a master of child and adult fiction and a huge Doctor Who it comes as no surprise that Neil Gaiman has been chosen to produce this final story. He is well suited to the task and this Tory delivers.

In the last few years, particularly in the 'The End of Time', the destruction of the Timelords in the Time War has virtually been seen as if it as good for the universe as the destruction of the Daleks. This story redresses the balance a bit by being concerned with what could go wrong in the universe or threaten it with the Timelords absence. In this story a dangerous species known as the Kin have been able to escape their eternal prison once the Timelords are no longer there to contain them.

The Kin are quite a good invention, certainly they possess some individuality amongst Doctor Who monsters. There probably isn't that much scope for them to be reused because they are more of an interesting concept than anything. It is definitely an idea for an alien that makes you think and it is used to great advantage in this story. They also have a somewhat disconcerting presence.

Set somewhere in the early days of the Doctor and Amy being together, Gaiman captures their pre-Rory relationship perfectly and their characters are spot on. Polly is little more than the stereotypical child role that has become almost generic in this novella series though.

This is a fine story for adults and children alike but one of the series that features a bit more fan indulgence than some. There is even a topical reference in there to the John Hurt version of the Doctor. Overall though it is a strong ending to a generally enjoyable series and I personally prefer this story to Gaiman's two televised Doctor Who stories. But now I'm looking forward to reading Maximelos and the three Orgrons.
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on 24 May 2015
Whatever Neil Gaiman writes is magic. Put him in charge of the Doctor, any Doctor, and Whovians will once more find themselves in science fiction heaven. The primary goal of the story’s principal bad guy is to destroy the one remaining Time Lord. But then it becomes something much, much worse. This short is full of literary jewels, featuring new techniques to express the inexpressible. For example, The Tardis arriving on planet Earth has been told in story form countless times, but Mr Gaiman says it so well on page 472 of my Penguin Omnibus edition:

’There was a rhythmic grinding sound, as if the engines of the universe itself were protesting...’

And of course when you think about travelling inside the famous blue police box, that is exactly what is happening.

We know the formula by now: The bad guys appear in the story, come into contact with our heroes (man, woman, and machine), cause havoc, threaten much wider-scoped havoc, and are eventually caught up with, beaten into submission, and / or destroyed. But the fun in a Dr Who novel is in the details. And there are plenty of details NOTHING O’CLOCK, and there is plenty of fun in this one!

Full marks from me.

BFN Greggorio
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 4 December 2013
There was a lot of potential here. A good portrayal of The Doctor and Amy, the spooky masks, the ancient and malicious Kin that (nearly) outlasted the Time Lords. But the story was let down by a weak ending. The basic idea (and the title) is great, but it was too easy. You can almost hear the Kin say "Oops!", or "Curses! And I would have managed it if it hadn't been for you meddling Time Lord!"
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The Doctor Who 50th anniversary short stories certainly were a rollercoaster. There were highs. There were lows. There were lulls. Finally, after a couple of solidly entertaining stories, we reach the pinnacle of this experiment. Seeing that Neil Gaiman was going to be writing for our floppy haired, bow tie wearing, (then current) Doctor gave me a little hope. Although it did feel like a trap.
Oh, how wrong I was! Not only is Nothing O'clock the best one we've had in a mixed bag but it introduces perhaps my favourite all time DW villain. I'm not going to say much about them or the plot they drive right over your nerve endings but I will say this....
The Kin are truly awesome!
Mr Gaiman, I take off my fez to you. This a wonderful curtain call to a very big year for our madman in a box. I can't thank you enough.
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on 18 November 2014
Loved this story...The Kin are a very original and brilliant enemy.I liked the way they were a gishtalt enemy..One being with so many entitys..and that they were a direct enemy of The Timelords..The Doctor and Amy get involved when they land on earth in 2010 with Amy hearing The Kin speaking to her telepathically saying that earth was sold to them and all humans were extinct..The Doctor has to take The T.A.R.D.I.S to 1984 to deal with The Kin were they began their invasion..I thought this story was in places creepy as were The Kin..They try to trap The Doctor in their prison as The Timelords trapped them..The story as a whole was excellent as was the ending..An excellent final installment to the 50th Anniversary stories...and one I trully recommend.
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on 16 December 2013
Witty, creepy, and breathlessly paced, this is a fine end to this anniversary series of original Doctor Who shorts. The Kin are a deliciously odd villain, juxtaposing two less sinister archetypes to create something uniquely Gaimanesque, and their scheme to conquer the earth by effectively buying it and evicting the current tenants is smart and funny. There are some less than usual time travel applications too, so good that you find yourself wondering how on earth nobody has done it before. If there's a problem with the book, it's only the length. Too many good ideas for the page count, which leaves all of them under-served by the resolution. A very good read though, whatever your age.
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Its a shame that book is so short, though it made for an engaging 45 minutes. The characters are well realized, and its a very easy read. The Kin are a great invention, and it seems sad to see them come and go so fast (hopefully they will join the likes of Blink and The Lodger and bring the characters and concepts to the series proper).

Of all the short stories released this year, this is the first i would highly recommend, while some of the others have been entertaining this one has been a great read. Really cant recommend it enough.
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on 4 December 2013
I've got a couple of Gaiman novels on my TBR list and his "Doctor's Wife" episode of Doctor Who is one of my favourites of the new era.

This isn't quite up to that standard but it's very good. Strong idea, well executed and he captures the eleventh Doctor well in the dialogue I thought. It was also quite visual and it would have been nice to see it as an actual TV episode, although it covers some ground they've done a couple of times I suppose.

Definitely a worthwhile read for Gaiman fans and Whovians alike.
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on 7 December 2013
I gave this five stars because of how the story grips you and makes you want to finish it all in one go.

As a teacher I would love to have this book in my classroom as it has many possibilities to be used as a teaching activity.
As a Whovian i'd love to see this adapted for the screen.

You won't be wasting you money here, but it and devour it :-)
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on 27 December 2013
This book was extremely good. It had an amazing story and plot. It was very good but extremely short, I read the book in the space of a morning. I would recommend this to people who love Doctor Who as this was the special 50th anniversary book. Also I recommend this to people who like short stories.

By G.F.E.Pash
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