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5.0 out of 5 stars Mad About the Mabel!
I will start off by saying, without a doubt, I love Bridget Jones! Loved the first two books and the subsquent films. It made me nervous to read this first installment, so much so that I didn't read it for six months after I downloaded it to my Kindle app.

I finally bit the bullet and began reading it whilst on holiday... I couldn't put it down! After the...
Published 1 month ago by MrsWhisk

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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Awful
Was so disappointed when reading the reviews of this when it first came out that I decided to wait and get it for free from my local Library. I'm glad I did as if I had paid for it I would have been sorely disappointed.

I remember for Comic Relief a few years ago that Helen Fielding went on Twitter as Bridget Jones as part of a 'prize'. I found her tweets...
Published 5 months ago by DOUBLE 'L'


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Awful, 23 May 2014
By 
DOUBLE 'L' (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Was so disappointed when reading the reviews of this when it first came out that I decided to wait and get it for free from my local Library. I'm glad I did as if I had paid for it I would have been sorely disappointed.

I remember for Comic Relief a few years ago that Helen Fielding went on Twitter as Bridget Jones as part of a 'prize'. I found her tweets hilarious and of course Mark Darcy and Daniel Cleaver also had a Twitter account each and with them all interacting with each other had some hilarious results. I was hooked on reading those tweets which disappointingly died down pretty soon after Comic Relief had finished. I'm not sure if Helen Fielding was encouraged by the response from Twitter to then decide to write another novel but considering Mark was featured on Twitter in the current timeline it came as a shock to find out that Mark is no longer with us in this book. Why oh why that choice was made by Helen Fielding I don't know.

I found Bridget's character in this book absolutely ridiculous. The age she is and she's still acting like a teenager. I just didn't like it and as much as I loved the previous books and the films this book just seemed like a complete waste of time and possibly just a money spinner for Ms Fielding. Killing Mark off was just a big 'no, no' for me.
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50 of 55 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Diappointed, 27 Dec 2013
By 
A. M. Mincham (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy (Kindle Edition)
What a shame, I loved the first two books. This one is boring, badly written and uses text conversations and Twitter rubbish far too often. Plus, what is the point of having a book about Bridget without Mr Darcy? Should have left it at 2 books- had to force myself to finish it.
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82 of 91 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Laughs: 0 (not vg) Eye Rolls: too many to count., 5 Dec 2013
Diabolical.

Lovable, cuddly, foot-in-mouth, just-the-way-you-are Bridget is long gone. In her place is a 51 year old widow obsessed with finding a man (yes, still,- and while we're on the subject, what kind of a name is Roxster?!), losing weight (yes, still, - a referral to an obesity clinic at a size 14? Really Helen? Way to relate to a huge chunk of your original fans there...) and booze (mouthful of wine in the middle of a children's diarrhea/vomit incident? Really?).

As for "hilarious" - if you find nits, poo, vomit, farting, technophobia and juvenile name-calling among parents funny, then you'll split your sides within the first 150 pages. Otherwise, you'll sit as I did, cringing for this ridiculous woman.

Just keep in mind when reading this that Bridget is no longer in her thirties and trying to work out where her life is going. She's 51, with children raised by a Nanny (even though she doesn't work) and a stupid boyfriend. Her friends haven't grown up either, and her mother is still commenting on her life even though she's now in her seventies.

Helen seems to think we've all forgotten who Bridget is - lines from the first two books and films crop up repeatedly. "Daniel, my former emotional f*ckwit boyfriend and Mark's former arch-enemy" or "Running around naked on his parents lawn". Look, I'm all for finding love and discovering who you are no matter what your age, but when these characters are supposed to be in their fifties and they're still having telephone conversations that involve the words "what colour are your knickers, Jones?" - it's time to stop reading.

Helen made a huge mistake getting rid of one of the most popular characters, but she made an even bigger one by writing this drivel in the first place. It's obviously written with the intent of being turned into a film, because it's lost all the sparkle of the first two books and instead is heavily reliant on visuals that will work in a Hollywood movie. The sentence "it's raining men" is actually in here. Repeat references to the Dalai Lama's twitter account and numerous mentions of checking for followers made me want to heave.

Awful.
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28 of 31 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Shallow, 25 Nov 2013
Although I read the book for some light relief from heavier, more valuable reading, this book is so shallow it is boring, and I believe would never have been published if it wasn't for the success of the films. The plot is totally predictable and transparent and as per The Edge of Reason, Fielding regurgitates the same jokes; thankfully this time there wasn't yet another fight scene. The character 'Bridget' has always been the appeal for me, which previously enabled me to tolerate the weak story telling, but I found it difficult to even enjoy Bridget in this book; Fielding made it all too easy for her and there was nothing and no one to root for, particularly as the ending was obvious by about an 8th of the way through the book.
Fielding writes that she cried when she listed the many people who had contributed in her acknowledgements, and in her shoes I would have been crying in shame; I suspect that Teenagers have written better books without any of the assistance or the financial incentive that Fielding had. I'm just pleased that I borrowed it rather than buying it!
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196 of 220 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Contrived, poorly researched, insulting to austerity era parents. Bit of a guilty pleasure then., 6 Nov 2013
By 
Amazon Customer "i did" (Bucks) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
First things first; I am a man. A not very fabulous man at that.
Feel free to disregard the rest of my review if you wish as clearly I am not Helen Fielding's target market either now or 15 years ago. In my defense, I did read and enjoy Bridget Jones' Diary back in the day. Oh and I have childcare responsibilities so a grown up Bridget should be right up my street.....

ANYWAY. Now you know my credentials or lack there of let's get on with the review:

I agree with every one of the 1 star reviews here, this is a dreadful book. All the points scored against it are easy shots:

The character has not changed in any way in 15 years despite parenthood and two significant bereavements

The tragic events glossed over in the recap are far more interesting then the trivia that makes up the actual plot of the novel, is Helen Fielding scared of depth?

It reads like a synopsis for a movie with Hugh Grant's character shoe horned in purely so the producers of the inevitable film can include his name on the poster

It is not funny - the comedy is horribly contrived and falls flat on it's bottom at every turn

The story is utter trivia - did I mention that already? It bears repeating!

And you will no doubt find your own list of personal pet hates.
Here are mine:

The dismal cultural research (Plants Vs Zombies is not a game in which children use zombies to destroy plants, there are no 'levels' to complete in Minecraft, the last time a child said "Epic Fail" in real life was 2010 and even then they were eternally shunned by their peers for using such dated parlance).

The constant product placement masquerading as authenticity (Apple and Grazia must be delighted among many, many others).

But my biggest problem is Bridget herself, or possibly Helen Fielding's world view as presented by Bridget Jones. Specifically Bridget's many failings as a parent, partner and friend are presented as lovable quirks intended to make her sympathetic. I found such behavior and attitudes fairly amusing 15 years ago but now that she has been cast as a parent see seems like a deeply selfish, self absorbed and shallow person. She completely eclipses her children in her own mind, along with everyone else in her life. Bridget is only really concerned about meeting her own needs. In reality this is hugely destructive in a child's life, so not funny or quirky then. Yes, I am being serious about a chic lit pseudo comic novel - but as the comedy doesn't really work I feel the novel leaves us with a very ugly central character who lives in a permanent state of excusing her own selfishness.
But maybe this is a clever dig at the western mindset? Probably not.

Which leads me on to my second biggest problem with the book; Bridget's life style. although she has suffered a huge personal loss Bridget does not have to work and has a nanny. This leaves her free to wallow in her obsessions, one of which just happens to be screen writing but could just as easily have been decoupage. Personally I am doing my parenting against the back ground of austerity Britain. Every time Bridget wastes a day reading magazines and tweeting then complains about her calorie intake and lack of productivity I find myself getting, well, a bit cross. Jealous yes. But frustrated that she doesn't grow up, turn her phone off, deny her own interests and commit to being present in the moment with her loved ones.
A clever dig by Fielding at the 1% perhaps? Nah, I doubt it.

So it's utter rubbish from being to end, an insult to working parents, to earnest non working parents, to feminism and a celebration of all that is banal in contemporary culture.

But....er, I couldn't put it down.
It's an easy breezy read and perfect for a commute, air port or pool side. Shame on me. Shame on us all.
2 stars then.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars disappointed, 12 Nov 2013
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I was very disappointed as first book was fab, I don't believe that 50 year old women twitter all the time got very bored with all the twittering. Didn't even bother to finish it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Predictable - a late middle age fairytale., 19 Dec 2013
By 
Laurie (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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The book was a bit of a roller coaster for me. There were some really funny parts and then some irritating and very predictable moments. I think the thing that irked the most was the self centredness of the heroine. At 50 with two small children (just how did that happen as she married Mark Darcy in her 30s?), she is as fickle and sex obsessed as an 18 year old. Her brand of HRT must be potent! It took me a good three weeks to plod through the book. Hopefully Bridget will now settle down with her Mark Darcy II and not turn into her mother, flirting her way through the care home fodder.
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44 of 49 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars dear lord, 26 Dec 2013
By 
Lynn Pearce (Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy (Kindle Edition)
this is a travesty - a book about nothing with a heroine that doesn't have the appeal she did int he earlier books. Not worth the money
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32 of 36 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Bridget Jones Bad Dream, 25 Mar 2014
This review is from: Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy (Kindle Edition)
This book was so much more than a disappointment, it actually made me physically cringe at certain points. Fielding's pathetic attempts to reflect the modern world were totally out of touch with reality. I don't know a single person who might identify with Bridget or her friends, who only seem to pop up to quote some crappy mantra, from a self help book that most of the world has forgotten about. Bridget has been blessed with children but they are far too young considering that she and Mr Darcy ran off into the sunset almost two decades ago. What's most annoying, the children seem to be at the bottom of Bridget's upper middle class priority list, making her a pretty unlikable character. This book's most unforgivable fault, is that it killed off Mr Darcy before the first page in order to clear the way for Bridget to enter the modern dating world. The reader would have forgiven Fielding for splitting up the happy couple, in a trial separation or divorce, maybe throw in a teenage child or two and some dating disasters which the reader may relate to, before they ultimately realise their love for each other again. In fact, I would still urge Fielding to write that book, the first chapter could start with Bridget waking up from a bad dream.....This awful book. Honestly, Fielding its not to late to scrap it and start again!!

One star and that's being generous
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars disappointed, 31 Oct 2013
This review is from: Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy (Kindle Edition)
I was really looking forward to this, being an avid Bridget fan but I've been disappointed so far. The other two books had me gripped from start to finish but I've struggled to keep reading this one.
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