Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Up to 70% off Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Voyage Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

113
4.2 out of 5 stars
The Tudor Princess
Format: Kindle EditionChange
Price:£1.49
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 14 May 2014
I could not finish this book it was so bad. Apart from the misrepresentation of life at the royal court, the constant use of dinna and canna as scot's language the final straw for me was Jame IV father being mutilated at the battle of Bannockburn. Given it took place 1314 his father would have been about 185 when James IV was born. I would have expected some basis in fact even though this is a historical novel. Very Brigadoon.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 21 April 2014
First, it's worth noting that this is a re-release under a different name of The Forbidden Queen by D. L. Bogdan.

Unfortunately, The Tudor Princess wasn't my cup of tea. I picked up this book because I was intrigued by the premise. Whilst historical fiction on the Tudors seems to be everywhere these days, novels about Margaret Tudor, elder sister of King Henry VIII and Queen of Scotland, are few and far between. So I was quite interested in the idea of reading a novel about Margaret's life and her struggles.

The choice of pacing and the book's style of telling instead of showing were what stopped me from really enjoying it. Margaret expresses sadness on one page and excitement the next, a happy event occurs and a page later we've skipped a year and tragedy occurs (I'm avoiding giving examples as I don't want to give spoilers). I felt like the events of Margaret's life were being skimmed over, not explored in enough depth. As a reader I simply wasn't given the opportunity to care for any of these characters. That just doesn't move me, that doesn't tug at my heartstrings or make me feel in any way invested in what happens to these characters at all.When exciting or moving events occur off-screen, so to speak, and are related back to us the readers in a one line summary, you're basically cutting out the heart of the story. This is the meat of the plot! A writer wants to get their readers engaged in the events and characters of the story, and readers want to read a story they care about. When the events occur "off-screen" they lose a great deal of immediacy and feeling, and even worse when events are summarised and characters go from one emotion to the next and months and years pass in one page. In my opinion this bad pacing and telling rather than showing are together largely the reason why I didn't enjoy The Tudor Princess.

Put that together with a few other issues such as Bonnette's spelling out of accents, the blatant hindsight of the dream of Margaret's destiny, and the fact that Margaret herself came off as frivolous, selfish, and unlikeable, and this just wasn't for me. I'm sure the real Margaret could indeed be self-centred and insensitive, like anyone else, but I'm equally sure she was more complex and interesting than she's portrayed here. That said, others will no doubt enjoy The Tudor Princess, it just didn't gel with me.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 18 May 2014
Awful, I couldn't finish this - I 'canna' understand why anyone would give this a 5 star rating and 'dinna' believe how readers could compare this with other historical writers like Gregory, Weir or Chadwick - can now see why it was only £1 to download on kindle.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 18 July 2014
It's dreadful - none of the characters are remotely believable and the vague attempt at evoking Scotland in the Tudor period with one reference to a kilt and the constant use of 'canna' and 'dinna' is just irritating. Rebranded to cash in on the success of Phillipa Gregory - don't waste your money.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 7 May 2014
I found the style of this to be very hard to get in to. I love history, historical novels but this just seems stilted and to be honest dull. This is a shame because she ,Margaret Tudor is a key figure in history about the politics between Scotland and England. I kept persevering but to be honest couldn't bother reading to the end.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 11 November 2014
Read this recently while on holiday, borrowed from the hotel. SO glad I didn't spend money on it! Only read to the end to find out what happened, should have just saved time and read it on Wikipedia. The characters are all flat caricatures, felt only her son James was given any personality at all. Very historically inaccurate, I threw the book across the room at the first mention of a kilt (those wouldn't come about for another 200 years!) Didn't evoke the feel of the country or time period at all, even the drama was so poorly written it was boring. Show, Ms. Bonnette, don't tell! I'll stick with my Philippa Gregory and Elizabeth Chadwick from now on. This just read like it was written by a university student who had never even set foot in the UK, let alone Scotland.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on 24 April 2014
A new title. A new author's name. A new cover.

Yet EXACTLY the same book as one I'd purchased previously - The Forbidden Queen by D. L. Bogdan.

Why do this?

I've sent this one back for a refund and I won't be bothering with titles from *either* of these split personalities again.
55 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 11 August 2014
I love books about the Tudors but this was not as good as a Philippa Gregory by a long way. I have read other Darcey Bonnette novels which I have enjoyed more. This seemed to be one long self pitying account of Margaret, wife of James IV of Scotland. Somehow I just couldn't sympathise with her.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
TOP 100 REVIEWERon 11 April 2014
I thoroughly enjoyed this read. It is the story of Margaret Tudor, sister of Henry VIII, sent at a young age to Scotland as wife of King James IV. It gives a fantastic glimpse into how Royals at the time lived - the feasting, the jousting, the clothes and jewels, as well as the intrigues and plotting. It is a story of political danger, war, ambition, betrayal and bloody retribution. Margaret herself is determined to act in a way that will bring lasting peace between England and Scotland and is torn between the two countries for much of the read, until eventually she does truly settle into her role as Margaret Queen of Scots. Following the death of James IV she throws herself into supporting her son, James V, to secure his position as King.

She was a wonderfully complex character to read about, on the one hand she was an intelligent, brave stateswoman, a true Queen, yet on the other hand she had a strong desire just to be married and loved as a normal woman. She let her heart rule her head so much in this regard that it led to some disastrous romantic choices following the death of King James IV. She could be incredibly selfish at times, totally oblivious to the needs of other and so single minded was she in her support of her son, that she literally totally forgot about her own daughter for much of the time. I chuckled at her never ending love for fashion and marvelled at how easy she could be won over just by the promise of a few new gowns.

This was a really good read, that I got totally lost in and had a hard time putting down. Highly recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 8 September 2014
Dreadful! Historical inaccuracies, the use of the words 'canna' and 'dinna' (hilarious). Also the Americanisms used! This author should forget about writing historical novels of past English monarchs and stick to purely romantic Hollywood type fiction.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
The Fallen Queen
The Fallen Queen by Emily Purdy
£1.49

Rivals in the Tudor Court
Rivals in the Tudor Court by Darcey Bonnette
£1.49

 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.