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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Eclectic collection for Britten 100
This slim but diverse volume features an array of essays relating to Britten's life and work. Some have been published in the past, others are appearing in print for the first time. The selection strikes the right balance between the analytical and the anecdotal.

There are some fascinating contributions. For example, an interview with Janette Miller who took...
Published 9 months ago by Nigel J. Morgan

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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slim pickings
This slim volume, publication of which was supported by the Britten-Pears Foundation, contains 19 essays covering various aspects of Britten's life and work.

It's a mixed bag of personal reminiscences and critical essays. Janet Baker writes about working with Britten; Britten's music composed for the GPO's film unit in the 1930s is the subject of both 'Britten...
Published 9 months ago by Mr. T. Harvey


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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Eclectic collection for Britten 100, 26 Jun 2013
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Nigel J. Morgan (Wales) - See all my reviews
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This slim but diverse volume features an array of essays relating to Britten's life and work. Some have been published in the past, others are appearing in print for the first time. The selection strikes the right balance between the analytical and the anecdotal.

There are some fascinating contributions. For example, an interview with Janette Miller who took part as a child in "Noye's Fludde" in 1958 under Britten (she explains, unsurprisingly, that the composer wasn't at all interested in the girls!). I also enjoyed John Bridcut's account of Britten's competitive tendancies, Stephen Hough's short but perceptive overview of Britten's piano music and Richard Jarman's piece on the work of the Britten-Pears foundation. It is an extremely rich and varied selection.

One or two pieces are less welcome. For instance, Philip Brett's "Britten Century" is bogged down in 1990s gay studies theory and was extremely heavy going and overly academic for my taste. I also disliked the cloyingly reverential tone of Janet Baker's reminiscences: she starts her contribution trumpeting that "Ben was a king". Okay luv, you've made it clear which camp you are in.

Altogether a rewarding and fascinating read. A perfect book for celebrating the centenary.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slim pickings, 9 July 2013
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This slim volume, publication of which was supported by the Britten-Pears Foundation, contains 19 essays covering various aspects of Britten's life and work.

It's a mixed bag of personal reminiscences and critical essays. Janet Baker writes about working with Britten; Britten's music composed for the GPO's film unit in the 1930s is the subject of both 'Britten and the Gang' and 'Auden, Britten and Night Mail'; Hans Keller's piece on the Third String Quartet is too technical for the general reader; Philip Brett's 'The Britten Century' is a portentous academic essay.

In the first piece, Britten's latest biographer, Paul Kildea, criticises an earlier one, Humphrey Carpenter, for taking "many stories at face value even when he was unable to corroborate them". Words that must be coming back to haunt Kildea in the light of his ill-judged views on the cause of Britten's death which he put forward in his own biography.

The most interesting and informative essay is the final one in which Richard Jarman describes the work of the Britten-Pears foundation.

There are signs that the book was hastily put together; there are a number of proofreading errors.

In a book consisting of just 183 pages, five of the essays have been previously published elsewhere. Even at Amazon's special price, this hardly represents value for money. Frankly, it's a rip-off.

These essays should have been posted on the Britten-Pears Foundation website where they would have reached a wider readership.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Late contributions, 26 Mar 2014
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J. Green - See all my reviews
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When you look through and find no index or a single photograph, it is not a good start. Added to this the mini biographers brief CV's at the end was not helpful. A fair read but there are much better and more satisfying books on Britten
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4.0 out of 5 stars Wortthwhile, 10 Jan 2014
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Some of the contributor's may not interest everybody but imagine how hard tit will be to get hold of this and other books in a few years time.I can't imagine that the print run will be exactly huge..
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