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4.7 out of 5 stars47
4.7 out of 5 stars
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on 22 December 2015
Ok but not as good as his Sacred History Of The World.
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on 12 October 2014
Have only started reading this boo highly recommended
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on 30 May 2015
Interesting but not as good as the Secret History
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on 14 September 2013
Back in the last decade, when The Secret History was published, I remember reading it and thinking that Jonathan Black describes a Universe which is wholly recognisable to idealists & completely un-fathomable by materialists. Being in the former group, my metal feeling the pull of a force which other metals may not be sensitive to, I remember the sensation of being illuminated as I read through the pages. Naturally, not everyone felt the same way. It's not a common way of thinking.

The Sacred History continues with the view that there is another way to look at the Universe and our place in it. It's a story of perennial philosophy, the evolution of consciousness, our relationship to God and all that came before us. It's the story of mind before matter and what that means for the huge journey that is the arc of our existence.

The book is sizeable yet so well written that it's a pleasure to read. I feel that in these matters, too much exposition can rob the reader of the journey which is an essential part of development - but this book never oversteps the mark. As you work through the pages, the themes are presented and explored enough to make the mind whirr yet never forcing you in to a conclusion. You can't be hand held all the way here, it's important that you walk the last mile yourself.

It's been a moving experience. As I've read the pages and the tales, it's as if it's stirred up deeply hidden memories. Like hearing & recognising the echoes of the first great song & wanting to return home. The author understands his subject matter and also what the willing reader wants.
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on 8 September 2015
For those of us for whom science has not provided all of the answers to our questions this book is certainly intriguing at the very least. At the very best....who knows? Which I think is exactly the point.
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on 31 January 2016
This book was a gem for finding things out that in most cases are swept under the carpet...very interesting read...something that can definitely be reread..over and again..
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on 23 June 2016
Fascinating reading, too long to read all at once. Need to stop halfway through and read something light, give the brain a rest. Really made me think.
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on 7 October 2014
Lots of interesting 'stories' from different cultures and religions. It starts very well, but seems to lose the thread a bit.
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on 29 August 2014
Oh how I love Jonathan Blacks ability to transport me into that other realm. He makes such a wonderful job of connecting us to our very first ancestors. The sacred history will make you see the world through different eyes!
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on 10 June 2014
The author is Jonathan Black who is really Mark Booth. That sorts of sets the way ahead, lots of random statements without a central thread to lash them together. Angels flutter in and out of the text occasionally. Vignettes on Lincoln, Hitler and the Dalai Llama mean exactly what? If he had concentrated on angels that would have been a less confusing read. By including strange creatures and various ethnic beliefs he wanders about too much. Why leave out the leprechaun or the gremlin? Reading this is hard going and ultimately I didn't find the journey worthwhile.
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