Customer Reviews


3 Reviews
5 star:
 (3)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rant And Roll!, 14 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Revolutionary Suicide (Audio CD)
Julian's umpteenth album is probably his best ever. Lyrically it's very, VERY daring and musically it's all over the place - sort of DIY folk with bits of pop/punk/metal/Krautrock chucked in for good measure.

The first CD is the more downbeat. It's got two long set pieces:- 'Hymn To Odin' and 'The Armenian Genocide'. The former takes a jaundiced look at religions emanating from the Middle East and the latter is self-explanatory! Both begin quietly and gradually, over many, many verses - (thank goodness the lyrics are printed in the CD booklet) - things reach a stupendous climax. Sandwiched in-between is the shorter 'Why Did The Chicken Cross My Mind'; the most outspoken lyrics of all are on this track which rails against some aspects of Islam.

The second CD is more upbeat overall, although the final track - 'Destroy All Religion', er is there a pattern emerging?! - is more of a drone. 'Russian Revolution Blues' has some very clever wordplay, pointing the finger at all the major powers for what happened in Cambodia re-Pol Pot. 'They Were On Hard Drugs' is actually just bonkers; Julian's rather cultured voice seemed so incongruous it made me laugh. There are also two poems but these are just printed and not voiced!

Quite an astonishing album in many ways then but it'll never trouble the charts in a million years!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Viva la revolutionary suicide!, 25 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Revolutionary Suicide (Audio CD)
You really should listen to this big bad Beowulf of a Coprehensive classic album. It will make you laugh, it will make you cry, it will make you think and if you have not listened to any other Julian Cope albums I suggest it will set you off to search through his back catalogue for more - and if so I envy you on the untold riches you are yet to unearth!

This album is split into two discs, one featuring three songs (and some very long ones) and the other eight songs so there is a lot of material here for you to digest, too much for one or two listens. As you would expect if you have listened to Julian's material in recent years, this is not an album which will go down well with greedheads, killcrazy tyrants or religious extremists. As usual, the Archdrude follows his Muse, mixing a strange variety of sounds and noises, combining thunder and rain, nursery rhyme, krautrock, folk, prog rock, catchy choruses and whatever else strikes him as necessary to the overall picture. In this album you can suddenly come across Stonehenge, Dinky Toys, Armenian Massacres, Neville Chamberlain, Peterloo and Odin's mead hall and Julian certainly has a sense of humour. However the main emotion on this album is one of red rage - anger for injustices past and present. The centre pieces are probably The Armenian Genocide and Destoy Religion - two long, sprawling furious epics but the first is surprisingly poignant and sensitively handled. Why Did The Chicken Cross My Mind? is a great title for a great song which challenges the cowardly kowtowing of this spineless century and is a clarion call for activism in the face of totalitarian forces which want to drive us back from the space age to the bronze age.

Old fans of the Teardrop Explodes will know however that Julian is capable of crafting songs of great beauty and there are some killer harmonies and melodies on this album alongside the superb tribal drum sound and the biting guitars. Julian is in great voice and full of confidence. In an alternative universe catchy songs like Revolutionary Suicide and Paradise Mislaid would be shooting up the charts of alternative pop-pickers. Mexican Revolution Blues and Russian Revolution Blues follow these two numbers on Disc Two, full of typical Cope arch historical references to the likes of Lennon and McCartney, sorry, I mean Lenin and McCarthy. They Were On Hard Drugs clearly has a message but is also very funny, as is In His Cups, full of maudlin self-pity. Phoney People, Phoney Lives with its experimental noises leads into the aforementioned Destroy Religion, the final track on this powerful double album.

On the front of this album, Julian refers to his classic album Peggy Suicide released 20 years ago. If you like this and don't have that album or its follow-up Jehovahkill, you should get them quick.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars stupendously good, 12 Aug 2014
This review is from: Revolutionary Suicide (Audio CD)
Thank you world for giving us Julian Cope. His best album since, well since his last one. Brilliant, funny, sad, tuneful. Keep it up, That is all.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Revolutionary Suicide
Revolutionary Suicide by Julian Cope (Audio CD - 2013)
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews