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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent album
I haven't a lot to add to Gannon's excellent review here. This is a very good album by The National. Don't look for great surprises or radical shifts of direction - they carry on doing what they were already doing on High Violet and they do it very well - mournful, haunting and to me very beautiful songs, excellently sung and played in their distinctive style...
Published 15 months ago by Sid Nuncius

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Trouble
Some good tracks, but not as good as High Violet, Boxer or Alligator. Still worth a listen with some good standout tracks.
Published 5 months ago by James Lewis


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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent album, 20 May 2013
By 
Sid Nuncius (London) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (No. 1 Hall OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Trouble Will Find Me (Audio CD)
I haven't a lot to add to Gannon's excellent review here. This is a very good album by The National. Don't look for great surprises or radical shifts of direction - they carry on doing what they were already doing on High Violet and they do it very well - mournful, haunting and to me very beautiful songs, excellently sung and played in their distinctive style.

I'll spare you a lot of superfluous verbiage. It seems to me that the long and short of it is this: if you like The National's work so far then you'll love this. If you don't you won't. I most certainly do.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Getting better with every listen, 11 Jun 2013
By 
Mr. D. J. Marsh (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Trouble Will Find Me (Audio CD)
I am a big fan of The National and after their excellent last album, High Violet, I was very excited that they were releasing yet another album. I had been listening to 'Demons' on BBC R6 for several weeks before its release and had pre-ordered this cd (which I rarely do these days). It's a fantastic album, takes a while to grow on you but when it has bedded into your brain its quite addictive and you will want more.... Loving it so far and would thoroughly recommend it to anyone who has enjoyed their previous albums or fancies something new.
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39 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sixing Pretty, 20 May 2013
By 
Gannon (Manchester, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Trouble Will Find Me (Audio CD)
With each release by The National comes a certain weight of expectation that, with patience, what initially seems simple will give way to complex currents capable of engulfing you entirely. Now on their sixth LP of intelligent indie-rock, Trouble Will Find Me is no different in this regard, offering glorious reward in proportion to time invested once more.

Hats off to the Ohio-born, Brooklyn-based five-piece for not going stadium-sized too when it must occasionally be financially tempting to morph into U2 mode. Indeed, in places, the retiring Trouble Will Find Me is perhaps the opposite of what one might expect at this stage of their wonderful fourteen-year career. The stark power of teary stripped-back cuts such as "Slipped", for example, are just as striking as trademark moments of heavy-hearted rapture like "Graceless", during which Matt Berninger`s baritone stands firm against swooping torrents that race past with almost elemental inevitability.

The National are a precious band, one that already mean the world to some and with the lump-in-throat "I Need My Girl" they're only cementing this position. Its plucked strings fire off like welding sparks as, amidst a drizzle of ghostly harmonica, Berninger dictates the melody with tempo changes. And though this bittersweet anthem for the lovelorn has a straightforward message it delivers as massive and immovable a statement as erecting a granite monolith in driving rain.

That there's no seismic shift in direction is comforting, especially when one considers the large supporting cast which includes backing by the likes of St. Vincent, Sharon Van Etten and Nona Marie Invie of Dark Dark Dark. Sufjan Stevens also contributes drum machine to a number of tracks, notably to the confessional first single "Demons" - part of a flawless opening five tracks during which the subtle epic "I Should Live In Salt" comes alive with the introduction of a low-end swell and the effortless beauty of "Fireproof" is allowed to shine via its diverse arrangement.

Second single "Don't Swallow The Cap" is a real standout too, its searching guitar line pitting its wits against dynamic drums, urgent string stabs and a take-home chorus that reads like a diary entry. Closing this impeccable quintet is "Sea Of Love" from which the album title comes as well as the LP's biggest blowout.

In such company and with a running order that lasts nearly an hour there are inevitably a few lesser peaks though they're sequenced wisely, the open spaces and clean guitar chimes of "Humiliation", for example, breaking up an oppressive tail-end. And despite, arguably, Trouble Will Find Me lacking an arms-wide avalanche to rival, say, "Bloodbuzz Ohio", it instead makes its case with timeless signatures of dignity and stealth that gather and swirl together as an unstoppable storm of emotion. Don't be surprised if you lose yourself to it completely.

Advised downloads: "I Need My Girl", "Graceless" and "Don't Swallow The Cap"
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Utterly brilliant, 16 Jan 2014
By 
The Old Dead Pig (northwest england) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Trouble Will Find Me (Audio CD)
Another of my five perfect albums of 2013. Longtime fan, since Alligator, but wasn't so keen on Boxer which I found a bit bland. This on the other hand is dark, mournful perfection. Don't know who Jenny is, but the singer is pretty upset about her and has been inspired to write much of this album about loss and death. Which is right up my alley! Pink Rabbits was my favourite tune of 2013.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Happy to be fed up, 24 May 2013
By 
M. A. Lidis "theboylidis" (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Trouble Will Find Me (Audio CD)
Alligator was the first record I heard by The National. A blinding album it is too. It hit me in a way no album had since my teens (then 27 now 33).

Whomever said "There should be no artists only their work" alive or dead would be a National fan.

This is music to be absorbed on good headphones, alone.

Intelligent, maladjusted people are let down by pop. The Smiths recorded angst and melancholy, The Wedding Present recorded a broken heart and, in my experience, The National are the only band to accurately represent depression. And I love them for it.

Amazing record.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a masterpiece, 29 Jun 2013
By 
Mr. M. Aldron (swansea, south wales) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Trouble Will Find Me (Audio CD)
i,ve been a fan since ALLIGATOR, and have all the other albums. I only found out that this was issued through Amazon,s site, as i purposefully don,t buy any music magazines, i,m 65 and have too many c.d,s most of which i don,t listen to!!!..I,m glad i did buy this little gem, as it,s easily their best work so far. I usually play a new c.d. once and then it goes into the pile to re- surface later on. This has had many plays already, and i consider it to be outstanding. There is a lot of additional orchestration, which enhances the songs, so reproducing the album live could be a problem, but it,s magnificent . As usual Matt Berninger,s mournful, world weary voice is the distinctive heart of the band, coupled with the usual off the wall lyrics...recommended
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5.0 out of 5 stars Significant, 22 July 2014
This review is from: Trouble Will Find Me (Audio CD)
Talented is an over used understatement for such a talented band. Living in the land of blank and not knowing their most recent album was even released after my over played High Violet mp3 first impressions are that Trouble Will Find Me more than equals and if not surpasses their previous offering which is no mean measure.

Another era, and less digi-ridden times and The National would consistently sell out large stadiums and become our signature box collections, but as it stands their unprepossessing frontage is scattered thinly and widely into the long tail of chart downloads. 4AD are the keepers of the keys to thy life blood, and let's bloody well enjoy their gift while we can.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolute Crap........, 8 Dec 2013
This review is from: Trouble Will Find Me (Audio CD)
...is what my girlfriend and everyone else I know says when I play this album. If you want to buy an album on the strength of the number of 5 star reviews chances are you will not like this on the first listen or even the tenth. But, if you just give it time I absolutly guarantee the subtle melodies, the glorious drum fills or the wonderful vocals wil get you and once they do, you're hooked.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Let it grow, 13 Jun 2013
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Albums by The National create dense and introspective atmospheres with just occasional glimpses of light and air. (Strangely, as a live band they inject energy and anger and release as well - catch a video of Squalour Victoria to see this.) Their previous outing High Violet had more light and air than some of their earlier records but TWFM is initially rather sombre.

They clearly want you to work at this album - the opening track has a strange mixed time signature that I can't quite work out yet and second track Demons is in 7/4 time, so Don't Swallow the Cap, whatever it means, comes as a welcome relief. Bryan Devendorf adds to the claustrophobia with his spiraling drum rhythms and very spare use of cymbals - they get used 'properly' for the first time on track 6 by which time I was wondering if my tweeters were broken.

On first listen Side B of the vinyl stood out as glorious (tracks 5-7 if you're on the new fangled media) with the soaring Sea of Love an early favourite, but after a few days the whole thing has moved in and taken over. It's still introspective but it's great to be there.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The National - Glistening melancholy, 20 May 2013
By 
Red on Black - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Trouble Will Find Me (Audio CD)
Albums by those American flag-bearers The National should be viewed as distinct chapters of a much larger book which is still being written. There are no sharp ruptures between their records and each develops in its own way and pace after repeated plays contributing to a rock solid oeuvre of songs. In one sense their nearest British equivalent would be Elbow. Simply put their records couldn't be by anyone else, you judge them on the strength of the songs and whether on the musical ledger book the majority of those pressed onto vinyl continue to be in credit column.

"Trouble will find me" is by any standards the least rocking and most melancholic National album to date. If you love the National of "Mistaken for Strangers" or "Bloodbuzz Ohio" this album only partly plays to that constituency, alternatively if songs like "Daughter of the Soho Riots" or "Runaway" floats your boat a treat is in store. This reviewer will start with a couple of negatives since this album starts and falters. There is something about the repetitive lyric of opener "I should live in salt" and the almost looped lines of "You should know me better than that" which as yet to prove a great listening pleasure. Equally "Demons" sounds like so much like a "paint by numbers" National song that it is almost a parody not least with Berninger's mournful lyric. Then thankfully by third song everything comes right and just gets better and better. The pounding "Don't swallow that cap" with its creeping melody and throaty Berninger vocal signals a step change. Its followed by the lovely acoustics of "Fireproof" with a shape shifting band accompaniment and restrained singing plus the classic line "You tell me I'm waiting to find someone who isn't so hopeless - there's no-one." The familiar evocative baritone of Berninger is to be located on the powerful "Sea of Love" where yet again can be found proof that drummer Bryan Devendorf is the beating heart of the band. "Heavenfaced" is just sublime. Other songs like the complex "This is the last time" mutate into a great Sharon van Etten-featuring orchestral coda from a more convention almost bluesy start. The solid "Graceless" sounds like it could have been happily located on "Alligator". More profound is the American beauty of the brilliant piano ballad "Slipped" where Berninger reflects "that I don't need any help to be breakable". The albums final quarter is easily the best part of the album and to this reviewer's ears includes three instant National classics. The sweet guitar coda on "I need a girl" leads into a tender vocal but images of people "losing it and driving cars into gardens" give it a darker edge. It will be one of those great National live anthems but if anything it is topped by the two final tracks. The superb piano driven haunting lament of the album standout "Pink Rabbits" is a tale of lost love where the singer ruefully reflects "You were staring down the street cause you were trying not to crack up/Bona Drag was still on/Now I only think about Los Angeles when the sound kicks out". Finally the album is rounded off by the epic "Hard to find" surely one of the great National songs in all its morose beauty.

"Trouble will find me" is a brooding beast of an album from the best American band this side of Wilco. The National are a band who now clearly understand their own inner DNA and have figured themselves out. They produce intelligent and emotionally weighty records which confirm the Dessner brothers amongst rocks finest composers. The Guardian recently commented about the bands progress that " what they have perfected, over the course of six albums, is a kind of glistening melancholy, a strangely beautiful dourness". These words are well written hence you must promise to listen to this album to find out what they mean.
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