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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A criticism of papal infallibility
This is a carefully considered and well researched criticism of papal infallibility. It is as usual with Kung very well written and reads fluently with well set out main points. It is highly critical but also very respectful of the essence of catholicism. Well worth reading by all who have catholicism at heart.
Published 11 months ago by P. MANGION

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Evidence is lacking to support the author's views
I was hoping for a reasoned critique of the Catholic Church and then a logical proposal for improvement. This book isn't it. The author refers out to other books by himself rather than present the basis for his position in this book. I am left with the feeling that the author believes that everyone in the hierarchy of the Catholic Church is wrong and he is right...
Published 8 months ago by Bill


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A criticism of papal infallibility, 27 Dec 2013
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This review is from: Can We Save the Catholic Church? (Kindle Edition)
This is a carefully considered and well researched criticism of papal infallibility. It is as usual with Kung very well written and reads fluently with well set out main points. It is highly critical but also very respectful of the essence of catholicism. Well worth reading by all who have catholicism at heart.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Blueprint to Save the Catholic Church, 22 Feb 2014
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As an example of change management, Hans Kung’s “Can we save the Catholic Church?” is outstanding. The analysis of how the Catholic Church is where it is at the beginning of Pope Francis’ term of office is compellingly absorbing.

Hans Kung puts forward analytical evidence that over the past millennium the Catholic Church was on an unchanging course. With the Second Vatican Council, this course changed dramatically through a paradigm shift. Subsequently those responsible for the Church’s corporate governance misunderstood the full impact of this paradigm shift and tried to carry on with the governance that worked before the shift. The result is that those running the Church became detached and remote from the corporate body and disengaged with the Church’s stakeholders; a classic problem of managing changes following a paradigm shift.

This frank and pragmatic book urges members not to leave the Church and concludes with a blueprint to remedy the state of the Church through a series of reforms. If followed there is overwhelming optimism that not only will there be a saved, Church there will be a reformed and renewed Church.

This superbly researched and well-written book is prophetic and its timing surely more than a coincidence.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Diagnosis made and treatment offered - but will the patient comply?, 20 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Can We Save the Catholic Church? (Kindle Edition)
I think this is an excellent study of the malaise presently afflicting the governance of the Roman Church. Kung sets out, as a medical doctor would do, to diagnose the problems and to offer remedies. He does so more out of sorrow than anger and states that this could very well be his last book. I found the way he structures the book to be very helpful indeed - there are lots of bullet-point lists of the important matters which for me anyway makes the material easier to understand.

In his introduction Kung makes the point that throughout its first millennium the Church got along quite nicely without the monarchist-absolutist papacy that we now take for granted. It was only in the 11th century that a revolution started from above, started by Pope Gregory VII and known as the "Gregorian Reform". This gave us the three outstanding features that mark the Roman system today: a centralist-absolutist papacy; clericalist juridicism; obligatory celibacy for the clergy. (The latter feature looks a bit ragged at the edges since the creation of the Anglican Ordinariate by Benedict XVI and the ordination of married former Anglican clergy who now serve as priests in Roman Catholic parishes. So married men who have always been Roman Catholics cannot become priests but married former Anglicans can. Only the Vatican seems unable to spot the injustice.)

Kung mentions the many (failed) attempts over the centuries to reform the system and laments that under last two Popes (John Paul II and Benedict XVI) there has a fatal return to old absolutist attitudes and practices.

Given the background of Kung's struggle with the Vatican one might expect this to be an angry book. It isn't - it's a rather sad book written by a man who is still a Roman Catholic and a priest in good standing and who is concerned about a Church that he thinks is very ill, perhaps terminally so. The surveys by Linda Woodhead, published in The Tablet (November 2013) suggests that British Roman Catholics have moved further from a Vatican-approved model of a faithful Catholic with every generation.They have become Catholic in a different way. But the Vatican carries on regardless, blaming everybody and everything rather than itself. So perhaps the Church isn't terminally ill, perhaps its present form of governance is - and this, I think is Kung's main point.

He writes: " this Roman system of rule is characterized by a monopoly on power and truth, by legalism and clericalism, by hostility to sexuality, by misogyny and by clerical use of pressure on the laity".

This is a challenging book but a book that ought to be read by Roman Catholics seeking honestly to examine the present malaise in the church. You are of course not obliged to agree with Kung.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I am with all days, 7 Jan 2014
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Christ promised to guide his church for ever. Hans Kung accepts that he does but questions whether the Church has been alert enough and whether we have been misled more than once . Provocative ? I'd say!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully Written, 27 Oct 2013
This review is from: Can We Save the Catholic Church? (Kindle Edition)
Hans Kung is without doubt one of the greatest minds and writers living today. I have read must of his work over the years and have found myself agreeing with his logical theological understanding... A common gospel for the common man that brings us face to face with the historical and living Jesus Christ who would be out of his depth amid the pomp and ceremony and corruption that is rife within the Catholic Church today. Kung doesn't beat about the bush but says it as he sees it... And this book lays bare the failures of the modern church and prescribes the cure that is needed to rebuild all Christian churches on the divinity of Jesus and not on the roman way. If you are a Romanite, heavily into the smells and bells of Catholicism, then I'm afraid this book is going to give u an uncomfortable pain in your belly. However, if u are looking at the Church in disbelief and horror and are seeking a new path, then this book by Kung will give order to what you are thinking, because in a parallel universe Kung would have been Bishop of Rome!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Evidence is lacking to support the author's views, 17 April 2014
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I was hoping for a reasoned critique of the Catholic Church and then a logical proposal for improvement. This book isn't it. The author refers out to other books by himself rather than present the basis for his position in this book. I am left with the feeling that the author believes that everyone in the hierarchy of the Catholic Church is wrong and he is right. Unfortunately this book gives insufficient evidence to support that view.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So refreshing and real, 4 Dec 2013
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This book gives voice to many of the things that have been going through my head but have not had the confidence or know how to express. An excellent read for those who want underpinning to make change possible.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Catholics Awake!, 14 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Can We Save the Catholic Church? (Kindle Edition)
It all needs saying - it all needs documenting and publishing. Hans Kung has made an excellent start here. I found his exposition absorbing if very disturbing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A "Catholic" Athiest, 6 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Can We Save the Catholic Church? (Kindle Edition)
As an atheist I still identify myself as a cultural Catholic. I think this book is a must read for anyone with an interest in the Vatican and the damage that has been done by this intransigent and out of time institution to religion.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Kung's last word?, 11 Aug 2014
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This review is from: Can We Save the Catholic Church? (Kindle Edition)
Challenging - a famous theologian reviews the state of the Roman Catholic Church from the perspective of one who played a major part in Vatican 2 and was a peer of Pope Benedict 16.His analysis of the present state of the church is pessimistic but he lays out a programme for recovery. This depends very much on the path Pope Francis chooses. I have read about 9/10 of Kungs work that are available in English and would never have described him as bitter or waspish. Unfortunately at this stage he comes across as both when discussing his former colleague Ratzinger.
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