Customer Reviews


10 Reviews
5 star:
 (8)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect, 2 July 2013
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This is a concise, clear and authoritative Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) handbook. It is free of hype and jargon and gives details of reputable providers of information.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A treasure box, 3 Dec 2013
As a mediator in another country than England and Wales, I was most happy to find The Jackson ADR Handbook. It has helped me to prepare presentations both in my own country - The Netherlands - and abroad. It contains a wealth of information, presented in a very structured and accesible manner, facilitating comparative narrative with the approach to ADR in England and Wales and one's own country. Relative to its comprehensive size, it is a well stocked treasure box. Highly recommended not only for everyone with an interest in ADR in Engeland & Wales but also elsewhere.
Martin Brink Ph D (NMI,IMI,CEDR), the Nehterlands
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The definitive reference work...., 30 Oct 2013
By 
Phillip Taylor (Richmond Upon Thames, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Length:: 0:35 Mins


ON ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION (ADR)

An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

Published recently by the Oxford University Press, this new work of reference on Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) has been endorsed and welcomed by leading judges and practitioners. It is already acquiring its fair share of accolades.

Appropriately it has been named `The Jackson ADR Handbook' following on as it does from the Jackson reforms. It is the direct result of Sir Rupert Jackson's recommendation that an authoritative handbook for ADR should be produced and indeed this is apparently the first book to focus exclusively on ADR.

Writing in the Foreword, Lord Dyson, MR credits Professor Frank Sander of Harvard University as a pioneering and pivotal influence in promulgating ADR as a means of resolving disputes back in 1976. The development of ADR in England and Wales has been facilitated by his work, as have, for example, the Woolf Reforms and the Civil Procedure Rules, as well as Sir Rupert's Costs Review. The result, in the words' of Lord Dyson is that `ADR is now a well-established part of every lawyer's practice,' adding that `the effective promotion of ADR is unquestionably in the public interest.'

The Handbook has therefore been produced for an audience of judges and lawyers as well as litigants. The fact that it is as useful for interested lay people as it is for legal professionals attests to its clarity, conciseness and accessibility. Even a cursory glance at the detailed table of contents should persuade anyone concerned with, or interested in ADR that this Handbook covers the subject in virtually every conceivable aspect from every conceivable angle.

The book is divided into six sections, covering general principles through to mediation, negotiation and the often controversial matter of enforcing settlement. The uncertainties of ADR, CPR and litigation are also examined in Section 2, including such issues as `refusing to engage in ADR Processes' involving `unreasonable refusal to consider ADR'. (Here lies a bit of a problem; the matter of acceptance of ADR among the wider public - and the possibility of outright rejection of the ADR option by stubbornly contentious individuals within that public.)

The final section of the book deals with other ADR options, including the use of online resources to support ADR processes and the development of ODR (Online Dispute Resolution). Important sub-topics such as arbitration and construction industry adjudication are also covered here.

As you would expect, the book offers ample resources for further research, including tables of cases and statutes, as well as a detailed index. Note also that the book has a companion website containing further resources and updates.

Whether you are a practitioner, judge, or student, this book is almost certainly destined to become a definitive work. `It should be as tried and trusted as the White Book and the Green Book,' states Lord Dyson quoting Sir Rupert Jackson. `It deserves,' he adds, `to be the first and only port of call for every student of ADR.' The publication date is cited as at January 2013.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No aspiring lawyer should be without., 26 Sep 2013
By 
R. A. Murtagh (Birmingham, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Like it or not, Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) now plays a huge role in the teaching of any Bar School course. It is growing in relevance, not least because of the courts' overriding objective to save expense and allot resources. This book is comprehensive and easy to navigate through.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent general guide, 15 Aug 2013
By 
F. R. Lewis "doublerose1" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Quick work on getting out a short, sharp and useful guide to the interplay between the new reforms and ADR (which is a growing area). Useful index. Recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars judicial guidance, 28 July 2013
By 
W. Rodick (Cheshire, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Confession first: I got this book for the wrong reason. I was hoping for insights and legal language to assist in my writing. I also am genuinely intrigued by how things get worked out between people. Words like: 'Judicial College' or 'The Civil Justice Council' and the god-like 'Civil Mediation Council' had me fascinated. Until I started reading the book.

Much of it, dare I suggest, is common sense. And ADR seems to be anything that is not using a court of law to resolve disputes. One fundamental difference between in court litigation and ADR is that costs are born by each party as they proceed under the ADR umbrella. So I am learning.

It is easy to read and reference. I would have drooled over a referral to the ending of David Copperfield: but that's beside the point. Or are amateurs in law still breeding?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for litigators in the current era, 24 July 2013
By 
Ross Boardman "Ross B" (Staffordshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
We can safely say that with cashflow being tighter more people are taking to the courts to recover owed funds. There is in parallel a downward pressure on budgets within the court system. Many county courts are being closed and the rest clogged with money claims. Since the advent of money claim online every man and his dog is able to make a claim for almost any amount.

Alternate dispute resolution (ADR) is going to be the one thing that could help ease the burden on the courts. Professional litigators need to be made more aware of the other options available to their clients, especially in the lower courts. This may have several benefits around costs, time and keeping cases away from the courts.

This book is essential reading for anyone looking at specific ADR procedures and the tools available. The court system will be more punishing on litigants who have not followed the appropriate ADR route.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 14 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A must have for any adr practitioner
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Essential, 13 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Jackson ADR Handbook (Kindle Edition)
Essential reading for all litigation lawyers, especially if you need to resist an invitation to ADR.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for all litigation lawyers, 28 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Jackson ADR Handbook (Kindle Edition)
Everything you might ever need to know about Alternative Dispute Resolution, clearly set out. The litigation world is changing - you need this book!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Jackson ADR Handbook
18.02
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews