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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars War, what women did and what they weren't allowed to do!
At the end of WWI few (women) 'realised how much they had done for future generations. They had become citizens. Even if the law, prejudice and convention were still obstacles to full recognition, they had taken great strides towards equality, leaving footprints all over traditional male-only territory.'

Kate Adie's excellent history of women's involvement from...
Published 6 months ago by Jolene

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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Fighting on the home front
I'm generally unwilling to bitch about new books but Fighting on the Home Front has really got me annoyed. I've read a lot of books about women's experiences in the Great War and I'm amazed that this one ever got published. Kate Adie pays minimal attention to the food shortages and rationing imposed on the population during the war, thus ignoring the huge part played by...
Published 6 months ago by J. A. Percival


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars War, what women did and what they weren't allowed to do!, 8 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Fighting on the Home Front: The Legacy of Women in World War One (Kindle Edition)
At the end of WWI few (women) 'realised how much they had done for future generations. They had become citizens. Even if the law, prejudice and convention were still obstacles to full recognition, they had taken great strides towards equality, leaving footprints all over traditional male-only territory.'

Kate Adie's excellent history of women's involvement from all walks of life in the war machine made me think deeply about how far we've come in a century. By taking concrete examples from all walks of life, the 'glamour' of the nursing staff, the well-known munitionettes and Land Girls, to the women who clean the trains (but were never allowed to drive), the clippies on the trams, the poster-pasters and the skeleton women's police force, she shows us women determined to do their bit, to prove that they were not the equal of men, but a more-than-acceptable replacement, women who fought in their own way just as hard as men for victory. Their grit and determination and sheer hard work wasn't so much surprising to me as the obstacles put in their way. We forget that 1914 was an Edwardian world of clearly-defined class positions and extremely rigid sex discrimination. Women were the weaker sex - literally, physically and mentally. They were the guardians of morality - and therefore to blame when morality 'failed'. French brothels were accepted, the very idea of a British woman mingling with the troops though, would damn them all. The resistance to women doing their bit, even when that encompassed the nurturing roles such as nursing for which they were accepted, was unbelievable, and Kate Adie's book is unbelievable full of examples.

It's a book about the politicisation of women, but it's also a book about the failure - or perhaps I should say the limitation - of it. It's a book that shows how women succeeded by playing to the strengths learned the hard way before the war - of organisation and mass mobilisation - through the much-derided women's suffragist movements. It's a book that made me think about why women don't seem to have been so traumatised by the war as men - Adie argues that because expectations of courage were so low, they couldn't fail, an interesting perspective. And it's a very readable book too - it's not just for the history buff, not just for the feminist, you don't even have to know much about the War. It's not a military history, and in fact the War itself is largely absent from it. But it brings the War slap bang into perspective, a century after it started.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating take on World War One, 6 Oct 2013
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D. P. Mankin (Ceredigion, Wales) - See all my reviews
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I ordered this book because Katie Adie seemed to be approaching the war from a very different angle to most other volumes being published at present (Max Hastings, Richard van Emden and Saul David stand out amongst the current crop). Kate Adie has produced an illuminating and erudite book - it is well written and very well researched (the extracts from various sources really bring the subject alive). Shifting the focus from the war front to the home front and an analysis of how women stepped forward to fill a wide range of occupations traditionally fulfilled by men has resulted in an enlightening account of the war. During the second decade of the last century social attitudes to the role of women changed markedly as a result. In particular, she is very effective at debunking stereotypical myths about the role of women during the war. Overall, this is a lucid, compelling and highly readable examination of the Great War but from a totally different angle. Highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved this book, 13 Jun 2014
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This review is from: Fighting on the Home Front: The Legacy of Women in World War One (Kindle Edition)
This is a beautifully researched and written book about women's contributed to the war effort and the legacy it laid for future improvements and recognition of the value of women in the workplace. Interspersed with nuggets about her own experiences and family, it shows how far we women have come, which by the end of the war included a limited franchise for women, and how much further we still have to go in recognition of equality with men. Having said that, it is not a treatise on women's lib or bra burning. Kate Adie shows how women of all classes stepped up to take the place of men in the workplace for the 'duration' from filling shells to working in the fields. from making nets for hay to feed the horses to arranging concerts, from funding and organising hospitals in the front and at home to bringing a touch of home to the front with tea and writing paper. This has been a good read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A work of scholarship - a highly readable major addition to the social history of the period., 17 Nov 2013
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John Paterson (UK) - See all my reviews
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Kate Adie writes beautifully and often movingly about women about the time of the Great War. Vera Brittan would have been proud of her.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent, 12 Mar 2014
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This review is from: Fighting on the Home Front: The Legacy of Women in World War One (Kindle Edition)
I had no idea of the role that women played in the war before I read this book. Nor had I understood how the war provided such a pivotal platform for women to gain independence, employment and status outside of the home. There were so many incredible women who I had never heard of before I read this book. Thank you Kate Adie.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Legacy of Women in WW1, 9 May 2014
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A very readable book which highlights at last the role of women in WW1 , underlining their competence to achieve and take on a variety of roles previously considered too much for them. Precursors to subsequent female achievement in the 20the and 21 Centuries. What a legacy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant book, 5 Mar 2014
This review is from: Fighting on the Home Front: The Legacy of Women in World War One (Kindle Edition)
Extremely well written in Kate Adie's distinctive style. So much interesting and fascinating information . Good reading for anyone interested in modern social history.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A most enjoyable book, 26 Feb 2014
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Mrs. M. J. Aljoe "judy" (London England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Fighting on the Home Front: The Legacy of Women in World War One (Kindle Edition)
This is a most enjoyable book it made me feel proud to be of the female gender I am sure there are women in society now whom, we know nothing about at this time.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 19 May 2014
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A great book from a great writer. Easy to read and understand the lives of women at the time of the great war.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent read, 3 Nov 2013
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Paul (Newcastle, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Fighting on the Home Front: The Legacy of Women in World War One (Kindle Edition)
A well researched book which shows women where they should be on an equal standing with men. Written by a woman who definitely proves the argument.
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