Customer Reviews


3 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5.0 out of 5 stars A concrete version of events
A book like this is always going to be speculative, as Scripture actually has very little to say about heaven. But Randal Rauser has a good (sanctified) imagination, and makes some really thought-provoking points throughout. I especially liked what he had to say about the question of where heaven is now - after all, Jesus is there bodily. Yes, the ancients held to a...
Published 9 months ago by Maverick

versus
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More questions than answers
I bought this book to give me some ideas for a talk about heaven and hell I was preparing, but I found it raised a great deal of questions and provided very few answers. It was certainly very readable, and many of the questions and ideas were really interesting and thought-provoking, but as the book progressed they seemed increasingly fanciful. The initial premise that...
Published 15 months ago by Oxford Bookworm


Most Helpful First | Newest First

5.0 out of 5 stars A concrete version of events, 10 Aug. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: What on Earth Do We Know about Heaven?: 20 Questions and Answers about Life after Death (Kindle Edition)
A book like this is always going to be speculative, as Scripture actually has very little to say about heaven. But Randal Rauser has a good (sanctified) imagination, and makes some really thought-provoking points throughout. I especially liked what he had to say about the question of where heaven is now - after all, Jesus is there bodily. Yes, the ancients held to a three-tier universe; but what do the likes of John Shelby Spong expect: that God should have revealed himself in the context of early 21st Century cosmology? That wouldn't have been very practical for our forefathers in the faith, nor for those reading Scripture in five hundred years time (should the Lord tarry), who would consider our very own scientific outlook pretty archaic. Clue: it's called accommodation.

Rauser confirmed something that is gradually dawning on me (thanks to N.T. Wright as well) that heaven will one day come to earth (Revelation 21:2). This, along with the fact that we will have resurrection bodies, means that life on the renewed earth is our hope. The material is not unspiritual. Rauser's vision of heaven is far more concrete - and exciting! - than typical Christian concepts of the afterlife. Will the Titanic sail again? I hope so! After all, God will make all things new.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More questions than answers, 4 Mar. 2014
By 
Oxford Bookworm "RGT" (Oxfordshire, England) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought this book to give me some ideas for a talk about heaven and hell I was preparing, but I found it raised a great deal of questions and provided very few answers. It was certainly very readable, and many of the questions and ideas were really interesting and thought-provoking, but as the book progressed they seemed increasingly fanciful. The initial premise that heaven is earth perfected (h = ep) made a very good starting point, and some of the illustrations, such as the view of a perfected Narnia in C.S. Lewis’s ‘The Last Battle’, supported this idea well. Questions such as ‘Where is heaven now?’ and ‘Will we get older?’ are certainly valid, but, as with many of the other questions, without any clear biblical or divine revelation, we can only speculate.

Randal Rauser refers to the richness of the culture and identity of the deaf community, and speculates that there may be people in heaven who actively choose to remain deaf in order to preserve that culture in eternity, despite the fact that part of Jesus’s ministry on earth involved healing the deaf. This idea seems most unlikely for a number of reasons. Whilst some disabled people on earth may find their handicaps in some way bring benefits, it seems inconceivable that any redeemed person would want less than God’s perfection, including the five (and possibly more) senses. I have heard of blind people who, given the hypothetical possibility of (re)gaining sight, say they would prefer not to. But I cannot envisage a compartmentalised heaven where groups of deaf, blind and other sub-perfect individuals may enjoy fellowship with their own kind but not with anyone else.

Since man is made in God’s image and reflects, to a lesser extent, his creativity, it is plausible that some of man’s technology man be resurrected in a perfect form (an idea reminiscent of Plato), but the notion that the Titanic could sail again seems quite bizarre, especially in light of Revelation 1:1, which says ‘…there was no longer any sea.’ And it would help if Rauser could get his facts straight – the Titanic was built in Belfast, not Dublin, as he twice states.

In the final chapter, on hell (which admittedly is a difficult subject anyway), whilst acknowledging the Bible’s position that it involves eternal torment, Rauser nevertheless expresses the view that it’s okay to hope that eventually everyone will be saved. And in a moment of very dodgy reasoning, he cites ‘epistemic fallibility’ to suggest that passages such as Matthew 25:41 may not necessarily mean what they say. Thus he opens the door to any scripture being at the mercy of the reader’s whim of interpretation, as well as potentially reducing the believer’s sense of urgency to evangelise.

This book could prove a good basis for discussion of various issues concerning the afterlife, and indeed, it provides some helpful questions for groups or individuals at the end of each chapter. But the reader who expects much light to be thrown on the subject will be disappointed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars recommended., 2 Mar. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: What on Earth Do We Know about Heaven?: 20 Questions and Answers about Life after Death (Kindle Edition)
Thought provoking book, recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews