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5.0 out of 5 stars Better than my amateur version.
I'm old enough to remember the original transmission of this story and I recorded the soundtrack at the time by fixing a microphone to the speaker of the television. So I know the music and effects quite well but this version is much higher quality than my recording.
Published 12 months ago by Terry Carroll

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3.0 out of 5 stars krispy krotons
actually this is a bridge too far for me. there was a time when i would have had to have had this but to all intents and purposes it is an unpleasant listen of bizarre ambient noises and early synth sounds. for completists only i feel.
Published 24 days ago by J. M. Edwards


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4.0 out of 5 stars The worst smell in the universe, 14 Jun 2014
By 
feline1 (Brighton, Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Krotons (Audio CD)
'The Krotons' was a 4-part Dr Who (Patrick Troughton) serial from 1968/69, and is often regarded by the cognoscenti as basically being a bit dull, with ridiculous-looking monsters. Budgets were so tight at the time that the Beeb couldn't even afford any incidental music for it... so you might well ask why on earth anyone would want to hear a "soundtrack album" for it 45 years later!
A cynic might guess that it's because Doctor Who fans are often obsessive aspergic collectors, easily parted with their money. However, gurus of electronic music will be aware that the lack of a conventional music score on this Doctor Who story was made up for by the legendary BBC Radiophonic Workshop, whose Brian Hodgson concocted even more sonic alchemy than usual to accompany the on-screen action. So, what we have is a nicely put together little CD, albeit just over 25 minutes in running time. It's been lovingly curated and remastered from the original tapes by MArk Ayres (who reputedly rescued them from a skip at the back of the BBC carpark, after some philistine managers had closed it down and earmarked its tape archive for landfill).
There's twenty four of Hodgson's tracks on here. And if you're at all interesting in electronic sounds and wierd noises, you'll find some absolutely delicious stuff amongst them. None of them were created with what we'd regard as proper 'synthesizers', but instead with a motley array of electronic test gear, customised gadgetry and primitive tape effects.
About half the pieces are ambient textures and drones, used in the background of scenes to give them some 'atmosphere'. Several of these use a bizarre device known as the 'Cystal Palace', a transparent perspex box containing "a tangle of wires and rotating vanes, a Dictaphone motor and the gold nib of a Conway-Stewart fountain pen", which functioned something along the lines of an analogue sampler/sequencer/source-generator, capable of producing pulsing morphing soundscapes. Highlights include the eerie "The Learning Hall", the ominous "Entry Into the Machine" and "Machine And City Theme", and the brittle "Kroton Theme".
The rest of the sounds tend to be shorter spot effects, which would accompany specific happenings on-screen, lending credibility to some prop or other. These include the nasty electronic "Door Opens" drone, the visceral white noise schwoosings of "The Dispersal Unit", and a new variation on the Tardis "landing" sound.
Thrown in for good measure is the appropriate version of the Doctor Who theme tune (Delia Derbyshire's revamp of 1969, with its echoplexed bass line and additional spangles).
All in all, what we have on this CD was never intended to be listened to on its own as music - it was all designed for specific functions in the context of a television program, to support the drama. But it sounds awesome! I'm happy to own a copy. :)
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5.0 out of 5 stars Better than my amateur version., 27 Aug 2013
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Krotons (Original Television Soundtrack) (MP3 Download)
I'm old enough to remember the original transmission of this story and I recorded the soundtrack at the time by fixing a microphone to the speaker of the television. So I know the music and effects quite well but this version is much higher quality than my recording.
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3.0 out of 5 stars krispy krotons, 6 Aug 2014
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J. M. Edwards "tommydalek" (Croydon, Surrey) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Krotons (Audio CD)
actually this is a bridge too far for me. there was a time when i would have had to have had this but to all intents and purposes it is an unpleasant listen of bizarre ambient noises and early synth sounds. for completists only i feel.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cybernetic Sound Sculptures, 16 May 2013
By 
Brutus Wolf (Sydney, Australia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Krotons (Audio CD)
The term 'cybernetic music' had been coined shortly after World War 2 by Louis Barron, a pioneer in the early field of electronic sound generation and "musique-concrete", whose special focus was the parallel between natural and electronic behaviours ~ cybernetics! Together with his wife Bebe, he sought to isolate the specific tones which illicited raw emotional responses from a listener, and compose "soundscapes" using only these electronically generated and compiled sounds.

This principle, and the experimental processes, laid the basis for many of the ideas which followed in the world of musique-concrete. And by the 1960s, the BBC RADIOPHONIC WORKSHOP were the leading sound-studio in this very field ...

The KROTONS was scored (by Radiophonic stalwart Brian Hodgson) entirely with electronic effects, moods and atmospheres -- technically no music whatsoever. Yet the vast majority of these soundscapes, organised compositions which illicit emotional responses, amount to a highly tangible form of music within their first thirty seconds progress. Music in the most abstract of forms, as elegant and effective as a sculpture by Henry Moore.

There are several pulsing electronic atmospheres in KROTONS which are outstandingly gorgeous, beginning with the hypnotic ambience of the Kroton "Learning Hall". This is complemented by the much more complex oscillation of the "Kroton Theme", whose variations, from lugubrious drone to crystaline rasp and back again, occur in such an arhythmic canon of overlapping cycles that it is difficult not to succumb to the mesmeric effect of a single sound repeated in endless, varying permutations. If you do succumb, you'll be jolted out of the spell by "Entry into the Machine", whose white-hot tonalities broadcast an atmosphere of nightmarish claustrophobia. To snap you out of that trance in turn, there's a distinctive Radiophonic "Sting" and a stately musique-concrete mood entitled "Machine & City Theme".
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars DIDDLY-DUM, DIDDLY-DUM, BUZZ, WIRRRR, CHIRRUPP, DIDDLY-DUM, 4 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Krotons (Audio CD)
As a show I like the Krotons. I will always think of it as one of the better Troughton stories although I am not of the age to have seen any wiped stories on original transmission.

I have this because I have all WHO sountrack albums..... but you have to really want this or at least appreciate you won't be getting much enjoyment out of it. It's certainly not something one could put on in the background as:-

a, it doesn't even run 30 minutes
b, it's pretty much all atmospheric tones and noises
c, you must expect the comments "what's that rubbish you're listening to"? Your cred won't improve when you tell them.

However, it IS nostalgic; it IS interesting enough to listen to and visual the scenes involved; t IS DOCTOR WHO!!!
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Krotons, 23 July 2013
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Ms. J. Wolfenden "phoarlord" (Lancashire England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Krotons (Audio CD)
Fantastic music.......................more doctor who stuff to collect....Very prompt and reliable service. Well impressed. Definately use them a gain. Excellent traders
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1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "...delivering a precise aural narrative that supported the on-screen dialogue and visual...", 13 May 2013
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Krotons (Audio CD)
The iconic and triumphalist Ron Grainer designed & Delia Derbyshire crafted theme music transports the listener-viewer to the planet of the Gonds and the misguided, inhuman machinations of the crystalline Krotons. Desolate, wind-swept and a subservient planet effectively hosting an infestation that threatens to restrict the development of the Gonds, the Doctor cannot resist getting involved. And that's why we love him.

On the surface, Robert Holmes' script is perfunctory but as you delve beneath the alkaline bubbling waters of the Krotons' science there is a story of political double-dealing, intrigued and internal fighting. Periodically, it may be dull, pedestrian and `wordy' but it remain a substantial four-parter, and, remarkably, is it is a unique production.

Across 50 years of storytelling, DOCTOR WHO - THE KROTONS occupies the honourable premiere podium as it is the singular production that forsakes the adoption of incidental music, opting for a raft of sound effects from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop's, Brian Hodgson (the original designer of the TARDIS sound effect).

Cleverly lyrical and tonally accountable in its structure, Hodgson's definitive `sound treatment' skilfully enhances the on-screen drama with dramatic, emotive and chillingly effective `cues'; pulsing, Serpente -hissing and threatening undercurrents that avoids predictable clichés that are frequently rife within the series.

Without the additional `smoke-and-mirrors' of incidental music, Hodgson was charged in delivering a precise aural narrative that supported the dialogue and visual, and he superbly succeeds (and, within the DOCTOR WHO canon, even providing a re-working of his TARDIS materialisation sound). With the release (for the first time) of his `original soundtrack' (re-mastered by Mark Aryes), Hodgson's contribution was anything but stark, it's precise, eloquent and memorable. However, surprisingly, the most disappointing `cue' is that of the Kroton dying; seemingly, too subtle and could have been augmented on the release by its painful death throes originally provided by Peter Hawkins.

Recently iterated in the NEW SERIES (SERIES 7) story, DOCTOR WHO - COLD WAR, Hodgson created a new TARDIS materialisation as it strains itself to seep through the vortex following the hands-free operation of the HADS (Hostile Action Displacement System).

Most chilling - even in audio - is the Dispersal Unit as it atomises flesh & bone, and vaporising all hope & inspiration for the Gond society as it exterminates the planet's youth- even if the Doctor's umbrella is effectively untouched bar minor shredding. Just as horrific in 2013 as it was in 1968.

As distinctive as the paced-throbbing of a Dalek city or space-vessel, the Gond's Learning Hall atmospheric sound effect holds a dark secret of science - physics and chemistry - that the medievalist society is only just beginning to tamper with. But within the confines of the Learning Hall the malevolent, unseen Krotons are systematically and calculatingly whittle the best from their hosts, gurgling and contracting within a disorientating hubbub of alien sound.

Accompanied by a metallic persistent bleeping and a hypnotic unfaltering resonance with burrows beneath your skin, the seeking `snake hose' cuts through the air, heading toward the Time Lord, with one aim; identify and disarm.

For the Kroton interrogation device, Hodgson creates a powerful, cellular-piercing sound that cascades remorselessly over the Doctor and Zoe with devastating effect, whilst the rhythmic Tinnitus of the KROTON THEME (track 22) is as constant as a wind turbine blade slicing through the wind leaving in its wake a disturbance that undermines consciousness.

Overall, whilst it may be an `odd' release' (i.e. being purely `sound effects'), DOCTOR WHO - THE KROTONS OST demonstrates the skill of an aural magician dexterously manipulating crude - relative to the technology available now - audio equipment to create an accompaniment that remains as a relevant as it was over 45 years ago. A testament to the imagination and technical ambition of a not only Brian Hodgson but of his colleagues collectively known as the BBC Radiophonic Workshop.

The release is not only available as CD and digital download but as a special edition 10" duo-tone sleeved vinyl (12.99) from SILVA SCREEN, and is released in the 13 May 2013 (and the end of May for the vinyl).

This is release is the second of a series that celebrates the DOCTOR WHO 50th anniversary.
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Doctor Who: The Krotons, 22 May 2013
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Krotons (Audio CD)
1. Doctor Who: The Krotons Doctor Who (New Opening Theme, 1967) - Delia Derbyshire and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop
2. Doctor Who: The Krotons The Learning Hall
3. Doctor Who: The Krotons Door Opens
4. Doctor Who: The Krotons - Entry into the Machine
5. Doctor Who: The Krotons TARDIS (New Landing)
6. Doctor Who: The Krotons Wasteland Atmosphere
7. Doctor Who: The Krotons Machine and City Theme
8. Doctor Who: The Krotons Machine Exterior
9. Doctor Who: The Krotons Panels Open
10. Doctor Who: The Krotons Dispersal Unit
11. Doctor Who: The Krotons - Sting
12. Doctor Who: The Krotons - Selris' House
13. Doctor Who: The Krotons Machine Interior
14. Doctor Who: The Krotons Snake Bleeps Low
15. Doctor Who: The Krotons Silver Hose (The Snake)
16. Doctor Who: The Krotons Snake Bleeps High
17. Doctor Who: The Krotons Teaching Machine Hums
18. Doctor Who: The Krotons - Forcefield
19. Doctor Who: The Krotons Burning Light
20. Doctor Who: The Krotons - Birth of a Kroton
See all 24 tracks on this disc

Generating and manipulating music and sound effects defines sound design, a process that is common on TV and film productions nowadays. However The BBC Radiophonic Workshop was way ahead of the game in the 1960s. Brian Hodgson was a member of the Workshop working closely with the seminal figure of Delia Derbyshire. As the original sound effects creator for Doctor Who he was responsible for the chilling Dalek voices and the powerhouse sound of the Tardis lifting off (created by running a back door key for his mother's house along the bass string of a gutted piano and treating it electronically). His highly innovative techniques are fully on display on this collection of 'special sounds' that provided the background to Doctor Who - The Krotons, broadcast in December 1968/January 1969.
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