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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A love letter to classic zelda games.
A link between world embraces its original open world exploration and adventuring mechanics seen in the first run of the franchise. Beautifully simple in game graphics, brilliant music and a novel story make for a great 3DS game. Some of the best utilization of 3D on the 3DS.
Published 2 months ago by Katie Smith

versus
32 of 39 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's Zelda! But with reservations...
Being a huge Zelda fan and having completed 'A Link Between Worlds' I thought I'd offer a considered review. As ever there are pros and cons but unfortunately the cons slightly marred the overall experience for me...

Pros:
- The graphics and sound design are impeccable. The 3D, for once, is a real selling point and not just a gimmick. The strummed, classic...
Published 8 months ago by Tee Double You Bee Esq


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A love letter to classic zelda games., 25 Jun 2014
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This review is from: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds (Nintendo 3DS) (Video Game)
A link between world embraces its original open world exploration and adventuring mechanics seen in the first run of the franchise. Beautifully simple in game graphics, brilliant music and a novel story make for a great 3DS game. Some of the best utilization of 3D on the 3DS.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best 2D Zelda ever, 21 Mar 2014
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This review is from: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds (Nintendo 3DS) (Video Game)
When I say 2D, I mean top down semi-3Dish 2D, as opposed to Ocarina of tIme.

This game is a sequel to the popular game from the SNES, A Link to The Past, it takes many elements that made that game great (Open world exploring, large amount of dungeons) and makes them even better.

This game is the first Zelda game to not have the dungeon items inside the dungeon. In every other Zelda game, the dungeon item would be found about halfway through the dungeon after fighting the mini-boss, the dungeon item would then be used extensively to finish the dungeon, and kill the boss. And depending on the item would be used outside of the dungeon too, some more than others.

This game scraps that idea, you now buy your items from Ravio for 800 or 1200 rupees a piece, then make your way to whichever dungeon you choose. This gives rupees a large use too, typically rupees in Zelda games are either barely used or used to buy some expensive item, in this game rupees are in constant demand, although getting the 15k+ rupees needed to 100% the game is not too hard, those who don't explore and rush will find themselves with a serious rupee problem. The game rewards players with rupees for finding chests in dungeons and the overworld, which goes towards the next item you're trying to buy which works perfectly. Rupees feel like a real use, rather than just stacking up in the hopes of some 4000 rupee heartpiece.

The game rewards those who played the original by having many secrets in Hyrule be the same, though they're not all the same, you will know where some are. This isn't a detriment to new players though, if anything those who didn't play the original will find even more exploration.

Lorule however, the somewhat unoriginal name for the dark world, will be new to everyone, and this is where you'll be spending majority of your time. The game takes place in both Hyrule and Lorule, after the first 3 dungeons of the game, you'll travel to Lorule and you're then free to fully explore and play whichever dungeon you wish, with the exception of one. I won't spoil it but one dungeon requires an item only found after another. It was an interesting twist, switched things up a bit.

There are 10 main dungeons, a final one and a semi-one. Unlike ALLTP where the dungeons could feel a bit samey, they all have a unique theme, there's your standard ice, desert, fire and all that, and a few other more interesting ones. There's a nice variety of dungeons. Dungeon wise, they're all well designed, with floors, another thing not seen much in the original is each floor having levels, although this was in ALLTP, every dungeon has 2 or even 3 levels, making it feel larger. Dungeons are typically 2 floors with a 3rd floor containing the boss. They're long enough, and since you have the item from the start, you get a good use out of it, that said, they could've been a bit longer, I think an extra floor would've made them perfect.

The music is a mixture of ok, decent and fantastic, the dungeon music is mostly good enough, its atmospheric and varied enough that you won't get bored of it. The overworld music is I believe, orchestrated and sounds fantastic, although nothing sounds bad, some sounds better than others. Some of the Dungeon music is plain catchy, others is just random piano keys that add more atmoshpere.

The graphics look beautiful, everything is full of life, arrows fly through the air, the fire rod burns the grass, water looks clear yet slightly opaque, and ripples. The game runs at a constant 60FPS and it's very noticeable, everything feels very fluid and responsive and I never raged because link didn't move or lag killed me. There was only one place in the game I experienced lag, and it was brief.

Items are done quite well too, there's the series staples, so you'll be throwing bombs, shooting arrows and whacking guys with the boomerang, the fire and ice rods return, and are great fun to use, watching the fire rod burn an enemy before flinging it into the air with it clutching it's butt was hilarious to say the least. Items are used with the new Energy Bar, which replaces the Magic Bar, I really love this bar, using an item ill use energy, which refills over time, in previous games I never really used more powerful magic weapons because I wanted to conserve my magic, in this game it gives you loads of options for combat, you can freeze an enemy with the ice rod, burn them with the fire rod, fling them into the air with a new item, the absence of magic also means you won't be leaving dungeons because of a sudden need for magic. Some may say it makes it easier, however yu can only use your weapon a few times before the bar depeletes, don't expect to destroy 20 enemies by spamming the fire rod.

The items can be upgraded using the new hunt for the miamais sidequest, in essence it's this games equivelent of gold skulltalas, every 10 you find you can upgrade a weapon, the upgrades are great, although a few can only be gotten after the item has been used in the dungeon. Finding them all is quite a task, and some of are hidden quite well, expect to slice every bush, and lift every rock if you wish to get all 100.

A new thing coming into this game is the ability to turn into a painting, at first people were skepticle, saying it's a ripoff of paper mario. However this mechanic adds alot to the game, it allows you to move along walls, and enter portals to hop between Lorule and Hyrule, hopping between the worlds is crucial, as Lorule is a mess of islands, and you can't reach everything without warping, the painting mechanic finds its way into every dungeon, and is used in more unique ways, you can slip through bars, avoid attacks, create wall paths and then travel along them. It never feels abused, and each time is used in a new way.

The upgrades previously obtained through sidequest are now in Dungeons, this work great too, the chests typically are a little out of the way, but you'll want to hunt for them.

The maps are easy to use, overworld maps allow you to zoom in and look at things in more detail, you can also use pins to mark an important location, if you come across an area you can't do anything in, stick a pin there and you won't forget. Dungeon maps are also easy to navigate, they show chests and each room, the dungeon map is available from the start, however the official map is needed to reveal treasure chests and your location. There's no compass, it comes with the map.

The story is interesting enough, with a few twists.

Overall, this game is the best 2Dish top down Zelda ever made, it offers close to 20 hours of gameplay and exploration. Difficulty wise the game is not too brutal, enemies take off anything from 1-2 hearts typically, however upon completeing the game, you'll access Hero Mode, which offers 4x damage, those looking for a challenge will find it here, suddenly Keese are doing 2 hearts of damage.

I recommend this game to anyone who loves Zelda.

Overall scores:

Gameplay: 10/10
Music: 8/10
Graphics: 10/10
Story: 8/10

A few bland tunes and a not too complex story.
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32 of 39 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's Zelda! But with reservations..., 15 Dec 2013
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds (Nintendo 3DS) (Video Game)
Being a huge Zelda fan and having completed 'A Link Between Worlds' I thought I'd offer a considered review. As ever there are pros and cons but unfortunately the cons slightly marred the overall experience for me...

Pros:
- The graphics and sound design are impeccable. The 3D, for once, is a real selling point and not just a gimmick. The strummed, classic Zelda tunes are a pleasure to the ear and hearing Yuga humming his dastardly theme tune when you first meet him in the Sanctuary is one of many inspired touches.
- The 'Merge' feature is an inventive addition to gameplay, switching to 2D within the 3D world to overcome problems.

Cons:
- For a seasoned player, it's just too darned easy. I finished in just over 20 hours of gameplay including the main side task of collecting all 100 of Mother Maiamai's children/upgrading all weapons. It has offered a 'hero quest' version on completion which just makes you more vulnerable to attack as far as I can gather.
- The fact that nearly all your 'tools' such as various wands, bow, slingshot, bombs etc. are available virtually instantly from a 'hire shop' removes the usual feeling of achievement in gaining these through tough challenges.
- Enemies aren't terribly intuitive and can be offed easily with frenzied hacking. The end of level bosses are too familiar in patterns and weaknesses to be tough.
- There are endless save points and routes through from Hyrule to Lorule which don't tax the brain. The 'merge' function, while hugely innovative, shoots itself in the foot slightly by removing a lot of the logic puzzles from the past.
- The game just isn't different enough to 'Link to the Past' on the SNES. There was a huge amount of deja-vu in enemies, settings and dungeons. The sheer excitement you get from first playing 'Ocarina of Time' or even 'Phantom Hourglass' just isn't there. The lack of difficulty also removes that wonderful feeling of achievement from solving puzzles in previous Zelda instalments.

As an overall experience, 'ALBW' left me slightly underwhelmed. With cheap downloads of the classic GBA and Gameboy Colour titles available, it makes you feel a little short-changed.
Saying all of this, it was a fun game and would suit the more novice Zelda player but as an attempt at nostalgia rather than the next stylistic leap, it falls short.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zelda as it should be!, 24 Nov 2013
By 
I. Zaras (Greece) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds (Nintendo 3DS) (Video Game)
I'm a big fan of The Legend of Zelda series. This title is a great entry to the series. The return to the 2D-ish graphics is much appreciated, since Zelda is best played in 2D on a handheld console. The story is typical Zelda, but the gameplay is fun as always!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great game for people of all ages, 4 Jun 2014
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This review is from: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds (Nintendo 3DS) (Video Game)
Me and my five year old son have been enjoying this one a whole lot. His favorite part was getting the master sword but mine is trying to 100% it. Definitely worth the purchase.
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17 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing game - a must have, 24 Nov 2013
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
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This review is from: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds (Nintendo 3DS) (Video Game)
I have just finished playing Zelda a Link Between Worlds and all I can say is this game is amazing.

You don't even have to have played any of the other Zeldas. You can just pick it up and get stuck in.

When attempting to tackle the dungeons, you are given the choice as to which you go to first. The puzzles are very well thought out and I enjoyed each one. I probably came out smarter after playing this game!

I noticed there are a lot of mini games in here that are actually fun to play, they allow you to win gems to buy new stuff.

It was nice to learn more about the story of Zelda, all questions answered too. It will be really interesting to see how they will continue the story.

Length wise it took me 20 hours with exploring the world too. Longer if you spend getting the collectables.

When I was a child ,my first zelda was a link to the past on the Super Nintendo, and if you are a parent, this would light up any kids day as a Christmas present. If I had a child I would be buying this game for them so they could relive what I did many years ago.
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39 of 51 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shigeru Miyamoto: "Sounds Like an Idea That's 20 Years Old!", 22 Nov 2013
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds (Nintendo 3DS) (Video Game)
GENERAL OVERVIEW: "The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds" is the first top down Zelda game since the 2005's Gameboy Advance title, "The Minish Cap". This game is also first new handheld title in the Zelda franchise that Nintendo has released for one of their flagship products, the 3DS. The game is a direct sequel to the 1991 SNES title, "A Link to the Past", which is one of the most highly acclaimed games in Nintendo's bountiful back catalogue, featuring all new dungeons.

Make no mistake. "A Link Between Worlds" is the best Zelda game since "Ocarina of Time" or, barring that, "A Link to the Past" itself. For longtime Zelda players, "Link Between Worlds" may first initially lull you with its emotionally powerful, highly nostalgic rendering of Hyrule circa 1992, only to discover how deeply Nintendo is rearranging the Zelda template. "A Link Between Worlds" casts off series conventions (while still retaining its identity as a Zelda title).

To compare notes with another franchise, Hideo Kojima is radically restructuring the inherent design of the Metal Gear universe by making "Metal Gear Solid 5" an open world game rather than a tightly controlled stealth game. In order to ease players into the radical shift and new reinvention of Metal Gear's signature stealth play, as adapted for an open world environment, Konami is releasing "Ground Zero", which is a prologue to the main game, as a separate, introductory primer for "Metal Gear Solid 5: The Phantom Pain".

"A Link Between Worlds" is a reshuffling of the deck, a "Ground Zero" if you will for Zelda. Unlike the Metal Gear comparison, this game isn't about charting new territory though - it's about returning to the very roots that made the series so special in the first place. Before we get into the ramifications and what this game may mean for Zelda in general, here are some pros and cons.

PROS:
Link navigating via merging into walls as a painting is both highly imagitive and drastically opens up new ways of solving puzzles and transvering Hyrule, breathing much needed life into Zelda's [intellectual side] cerebral side.
Excellent level design almost goes without saying. Nintendo has always excelled at level design.
-No farming for items. All usable items are manna-based, with a meter that regenerates over time. You never have to worry about running out of bombs or arrows again! (We so needed that in the original 1987 Zelda!
-Mini-games, including baseball (!!!) and chicken dodging
-Has a dual world setup (Hyrule and Lorule), like the original SNES game.

NEUTRAL:

-Borrows the overworld map of its SNES predecessor almost to the pixel. For veterans of the series, this borrowing will be highly nostalgic, though others may complain they are just rehashing "Link to the Past". One benefit of using the same map is that it helps provide continuity for a series renowned for how disconnected each game appears in relation to others. (In 2011, Nintendo finally published an official timeline in "Hyrule Historia". Guess what! There are THREE SEPARATE OFFICIAL TIME LINES, and all three branch off from "Ocarina of Time".)
-The story is pretty simple. While some may think that detracts from the overall experience, I am fine with a simplified story. Nintendo has never been about story, and when they do get tangled into in-depth story-telling, you end up with three timelines and soap opera disasters like "Metroid: Other M" which by the end you lose almost all respect for Samus. There's a reason why they keep narrative out of Mario games (though to be fair, the Mario RPGs have some good stories).

CONS:
-Visually feels little more than an upgrade to "Link to the Past", rather than a distinct artistic style.
-The Overworld, while expansive in 1991, feels a little small by today's standards.
-Lorule (as opposed to Hyrule) just sounds like an idiotic linguist pun. This is just a minor personal complaint though.

THE MORE PROBLEMATIC ELEMENTS OF MODERN ZELDA: It's not a secret to everybody (to lightly misquote a certain Mobin) that Zelda has grown increasingly stagnant in recent years.

"Skyward Sword" is by far the most devise of the mainstream "Zelda" installments, even more so than initial responses to the art style of "Wind Waker" circa 2003. The more flawed elements of that game are all game design decisions that became codified in the sacrosanct "Ocarina of Time" and over the years finally met their logical conclusion in "Skyward Sword".Eiji Anouma, the main overseer of the series, has even stated in post `Skyward Sword' interviews that Nintendo is rethinking Zelda conventions in order to keep the series fresh and relevant due to lackluster response by players to recent titles.

Tevis Thompson has written a great, lengthy essay regarding the issues he believes is plaguing modern Zelda games. (The title is "Zelda Just Keeps Getting Worse. But It Isn't Beyond Saving". It is well worth reading). Thompson is discussing "Skyward Sword", the 2011 Wii game. "Skyward Sword" is by far the most devise of the mainstream "Zelda" installments, even more so than "Wind Waker". While far too long to address Thompson point by point for an Amazon review, the essential summary of his complaints are three fold:

1. Zelda has gone from a vast, overworld experience to an increasingly narrowed, mechanical by rote design, rather than organic gameplay which invites multiple methods of play. Key quote: "Modern Zeldas do not offer worlds. They offer elaborate contraptions reskinned with a nature theme, a giant nest of interconnected locks." Thompson describes "Skyward Sword" as a culmination of "reducing the world into a series of bottlenecks". In other worlds, Zelda games have become so mechanical in nature that they have lot their sense of wonder and adventure and even (or perhaps especially) danger. The worlds also feel empty, a complaint I first voiced against "Ocarina of Time". For all the grandeur of "Hyrule Field", save for some Stalfos knights that appear after sunset and an occasional Peahat or too, it's a pretty empty field. The sky in Skyward Sword is also notoriously void of any real exploratory content worth mentioning.

2. Lack of Difficulty. The two NES Zelda games (especially "The Adventure of Link") can be brutal at times. Beginning with "A Link to the Past", the difficulty of the Zelda franchise has been on a steep downward slope. Saturo Iwata, Nintendo's President, has directly addressed this decrease in difficulty in Nintendo products.

3. No respect for the player. By design of bottle-neck environmental roadblocks (first heavily featured in "Zelda II"* and culminating in "Skyward Sword"), greatly reduced difficulty, and extemly intrusive "journey companions" that hold your hand every step of the way, Zelda feels more like a guided tour of Hyrule than a daring adventure with real danger at every turn. The puzzle elements have been greatly minimized due to constant direction.

RESTORING ADVENTURE TO ZELDA: "A Link Between Worlds" largely addresses Thompson's concerns. These are the practical, concrete game play mechanics in which A Link Between Worlds" is reinvigorating Zelda.

-Death has consequences. When renting your items, you are able to keep said items for as long as you stay alive. However, if you die you lose your items.
-Challenge: Directly ties to the first point. The overworld isn't the grandiose, but almost entirely devoid of enemies, Hyrule Field. Instead, there are well armored foes intent on killing Link and LOTS OF THEM. Likewise, the dungeon bosses are more difficult than we've seen in a long time. They take skill and cunning to beat as well as figuring out how to best exploit their weak spot. The dungeon enemies themselves are no pushover either.
-Enemies are used as boundary markers. From Thompson's essay: "Link must be allowed to enter areas he's not ready for. He must be allowed to be defeated, not blocked, by the world and its inhabitants." You can get into some areas that will push you to your max to escape alive, let alone in stunning victory.
-"A Link Between Worlds" returns to the open world feel of the original NES title, albeit in the confines of Hyrule as shown in "A Link to the Past". Due to renting items, dungeons are largely (but not entirely) completeable in any order, rather than a pre-defined set path that must be followed at all costs.
-Item renting restores some of the wonder and adventure to the series, because this time around you are truly interested in the contents of treasure chests, knowing that they will hold something other than series trope items such as boomerangs, bows, etc.
-Fast Travelling: If you find yourself without necessary items for a dungeon, you can quickly get to the shop to get said item via warp points without excessive backtracking.
-No more "Hey, Listen!" For the first time in years, Link is on his own, left to figure out what he must do without constant rejoinders from the game helper of the week. To compensate, if you need assistance there is the very unintrusive Hint Glasses which are mentioned briefly and then never forced upon the player, or visiting fortune tellers, which is entirely at the player's discretion. Just like the statue in the 1st palace of the Dark World where you must shoot an arrow in its eye to proceed or the backtracking in the Ice Palace, there will be moments you are left puzzling what to do.

WHAT "A LINK BETWEEN WORLDS" MEANS FOR THE ZELDA FRANCHISE: There are two main camps in Zelda Fandom: those who think "Ocarina of Time" is the best and those who think "Link to the Past" is best. While predictions are a dangerous venture at the best of times, "A Link Between Worlds" clearly indicates that Nintendo is not above radically rewriting conventions for one of its most successful IPs, returning them to earlier times. To return to the Metal Gear comparison with "Ground Zero", "A Link Between Worlds" is laying the groundwork for the still unnamed (at the time of writing) Wii U Zelda game which we know is in development.

Appropriately enough for a series with three time lines, developmentally and in game design "A Link Between Worlds" has effectively ignored the last twenty years of its own franchise. Nintendo has returned to the original ethos and game philosophy of the first Zelda titles and have created an alternate point of development in which Aonuma has indicated he is fully intent upon pursuing. Anouma has confessed to never completing the original Zelda title and wanting to never make a game like that. Before this game, this attitude would explain why there is such a disconnect between the recent games and the trail-blazing originals.

When the game was first pitched to Miyamoto (before it was a "Link to the Past" sequel or even featured the painting), he declined, saying that it "sounds like an idea that's 20 years old!". While the context is not exactly the same, Anouma and his team are finally returning to the hallmarks of Zelda that so captivated us in the first place (at least, gamers of my generation), returning to the older ideas of the series.

"A Link Between Worlds" is a course correction LONG OVER DUE, and if this game is any clear indication, not only have Anouma and his team learned from their mistakes with "Skyward Sword", but are going all the way back to the very foundational elements of the series before "Ocarina".

Aonuma has stated based on user feed back (now so readifuly plentiful via the Internet and Miiverse) that the new Wii U Zelda game will focus much more on the open-world feel so pioneered by the original NES classic that has been largely untouched by the series since then. Games such as the The Elder Scrolls and the Grand Theft Autos are more closely kin to the original "Zelda" than "Skyward Sword" If Anouma is to be believed, then the Wii U Zelda will be a reinvention of modern 3D Zelda titles. If Nintendo follows the direction established in "Link Between Worlds", then the Wii U Zelda will be a grand reinvention indeed!

While Miyamoto is ultimately responsible for Zelda, the last fifteen years have largely been spearheaded by Anouma, and for the first time I feel that we are seeing how Nintendo would develop the series based on the original four games. We are returning to Miyamoto's original vision for the series at long last!
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*Whereas almost the entirety of Hyrule in "The Legend of Zelda" is open to the player, in each successive game the ability to explore became increasingly more and more confined either by necessity of the plot or that to progess to Dungeon 2, you must have an item from Dungeon 1, etc. Thompson points to "A Link to the Past" as the starting point of this mechanical trend in Zelda games ("Oh, there's a wall with weird rocks. Use a bomb."), which is not wholly accurate. While minimally present in the original NES game, "Zelda II" is the first game that really locked you into a defined order of dungeons and locked off worlds. While `Link to the Past'`s Dark World dungeons are tremendously flexible in the order in which you complete them in "A Link to the Past", there is absolutely no possible way for extensive sequence-breaking in "Zelda II". Want to go to the Island Palace? You have to have the Faerie Spell, which can only be obtained by use of the hammer. Want to go to Maze Palace? Have to have the Raft from the Island Palace in order to cross over into eastern Hyrule. Want to go to the Sea Palace? Have to have the boots from the Maze Palace. To get into Three Rock Palace (or even access the southern portion of Hyrule in which that palace is located), you have to have the Flute from the Sea Palace to get by the River Devil guarding the bridge.
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18 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Zelda game yet!, 22 Nov 2013
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This review is from: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds (Nintendo 3DS) (Video Game)
I am new to Zelda however I was able to get straight into this game from the beginning, the controls are simple to understand too! I recommend this to anyone Zelda fan or not!
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most amazing games u can buy for 3ds, 22 Nov 2013
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
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This review is from: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds (Nintendo 3DS) (Video Game)
This games is one of the many reasons not to buy the xbox one or ps4 the 3ds has and always have a bigger better libary of games which will continue to be unlike most new releases on xbone and playstation which most people will trade in once the next game comes out unlike zelda and other nintendo titles which people keep i can guarentee people will be playing this in 10, 20 heck even 30 years from now just like ocarina of time and a link to the past please ignore =any bad reviews your purchase will be well worth it. Zelda is one of the best franchises for games and always will be
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars At last. A new Zelda., 27 Nov 2013
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds (Nintendo 3DS) (Video Game)
I have been really looking forward to this game coming out for ages. As soon as I started playing I knew I wasn't going to be disappointed. Great gameplay, excellent music and easy controls. The reason I gave the game 4 stars overall is because I don't think its as long as other games in the series. Got the game 4 days ago and I've completed it already. I'm gonna go for the hero mode now I think because it was a very enjoyable gaming experience. I would highly recommend this title to any fan of RPG.
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