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43 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars best reads
I read this book years ago (1972)and it is still on my bookshelf along with others about Richard 111....enough to say that as an avid reader of historical fiction this is one of the best...and written long before Richard became the cult figure he is now. Written with a great regard for Richard but not through rose tinted glass!
Believe me all the best books written...
Published 13 months ago by wcrocks

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ok for a light read, but not the best in its genre
A good book for reading on the train, but although the title implies the novel is about Richard III, he is in fact a very minor and rather thinly drawn character. Having a different person as a protagonist is fine, but there are long sections where we don't even get to see the king. The protagonist is pro-Richard and thinks he is a good man and not guilty of any of the...
Published 9 months ago by StoneLord1


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43 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars best reads, 27 Jun 2013
This review is from: The Killing of Richard III (Wars of the Roses) (Kindle Edition)
I read this book years ago (1972)and it is still on my bookshelf along with others about Richard 111....enough to say that as an avid reader of historical fiction this is one of the best...and written long before Richard became the cult figure he is now. Written with a great regard for Richard but not through rose tinted glass!
Believe me all the best books written about Richard are the oldest...do also try Robert Farrigtons "Tudor agent."
Another great writer, Rosemary Hawley Jarman wrote sympathetically but realistically of Richard the man and the period of the wars of the roses...
Seeing Robert Farringtons 'The killing of Richard the third' with its bright new cover inspired me to write this review of a book i sought out and read so long ago. Surely its only a matter of time before more of these great writers are re marketed because of present interest in that period...i will be looking out for them ..hope you will too!
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A spy story set in the Wars of the Roses, 26 Feb 2007
By 
Marshall Lord (Whitehaven, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Killing of Richard III (Paperback)
Entertaining if rather anachronistic adventure novel about a clerk who worked as a spy for Richard III.

The hero, Henry Morane, a fictional character, is chief clerk to John Kendall, a real historical figure who was Secretary to King Edward IV, and held the same position under Richard Duke of Gloucester when he was first Lord Protector and then King Richard III. Morane becomes involved in spying for the King on the intrigues and plots of treacherous barons such as Sir William Stanley and of the King's rival, Henry Tudor (later Henry VII).

Effectively Morane is a sort of 15th century Yorkist James Bond.

This is the first in a trilogy of books about his adventures, which consists of:

1) "The Killing of Richard III"
2) "Tudor Agent: Wars of the Roses II"
3) "The Traitors of Bosworth: Wars of the Roses III"

The book contains a large amount of historical detail, some true, some speculation, usually described in an entertaining and accessible way.

Richard III has been presented by Tudor propaganda as a monster and tyrant, and the murderer of his nephews, the Princes in the Tower. Henry Morane is clearly devoted to him and does not share that view, part of the story being around his attempts to discover and bring to justice the real murderers.

Most novels dealing with this period tend either to portray Richard III either as a near saint (An example being the brilliant "The Daughter Of Time" by Josephine Tey) in which case they usually depict Henry VII as a monster, or else to portray Richard as something close to the ruthless murderer presented by Shakespeare. This book and the subsequent Henry Morane novels are unsual in that they are sympathetic, without being sycophantic, to both Richard III and Henry VII.

All in all this is an entertaining book, but perhaps not one to be taken too seriously.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good fiction, 18 July 2013
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entertaing read and not so taxing so could realy relax when I read this book, I recommend it to any one
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Killing of Richard 111, 6 July 2013
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This review is from: The Killing of Richard III (Wars of the Roses) (Kindle Edition)
Anything to do with Richard 111 is always interesting and fascinating, I cannot make up my mind about Richard but can give him the benefit of the doubt.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The last days of Richard III, 8 Oct 2013
By 
Keen Reader "lhendry4" (Auckland, New Zealand) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
I thoroughly enjoyed this fresh novel based on the life of Richard III. The story takes the reader from 1483 when Edward IV is still on the throne, to the Battle of Hastings in 1485. Over a period of two years, Henry Morane, in the king's employ is in the thick of the political infighting and skullduggery that marred Richard's reign. The fate of the two princes, the forces loyal to Richard and those who sought advantage for Henry Tudor, and Henry's own private life are covered in fairly action-packed pages.

Interestingly, the author died in 1994, aged nearly 80, so it seems that this reissue of a book first published in 1971 and which I had not come across before, has been timed neatly to capture peoples' interest after the discovery of Richard III's remains. It's a pity the author did not live to see this, as you get the impression from this novel that he would have felt a lot of respect for Richard. His empathetic portrayal of the man who found himself in the rather unenviable role of King of England at a time of such turmoil and with threats from all sides is welcome.

This is a really good novel of Richard III; while it only covers the last two years of his life, we get a new perspective on times that may seem familiar to many through the eyes of Henry Morane. Great stuff.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great adventure, 26 Aug 2013
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I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and it is historically accurate enough as well. It carries the reader along on a rollercoaster of an adventure with enough detail to make it very convincing. It's easy to read as well, and after I'd finished it I found myself wondering what happened to the main character next, and that is always the sign of a good read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brillianty told tragic story, 30 July 2013
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This book is well written and grips you from beginning to end. I would recommend it to anyone who loves history
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not what it seems- but a cracking adventure story, 20 July 2013
By 
SusanS "SusanS" (Wakefield, West Yorks) - See all my reviews
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I confess to being rather drawn in with the eye catching cover and blurb of this book- and the good reviews.

I was sort of expecting a mystery story centred around the princes in the tower theme, but it's not, as such. That whole mystery seems to be "resolved" quickly with the poor old Duke of Buckingham neatly getting the blame for it.

The story revolves around Henry Morane, a canny medieval clerk to King Richard's secretary, John Kendall. After a run in with one of the Stanley's, he gets (sort of) employed by Richard III to do a spot of spying/general adventuring.
Richard himself doesn't really come into it that much- just pops up every now and then for a bit of "suspicious gazing" and to give Henry the low down on his next task.

It's really boy's own adventures, Plantagenet style- not usually my cup of tea,but it's hugely entertaining.
I loved Henry Morane and his feisty missus (Matilda),he is quite an amoral, cynical character, but very believable and likeable.
I think whichever era, Plantagenet/Tudor etc- Henry Morane would fit in with and the book would be equally as good.

I also enjoyed some of the language Robert Farrington has the characters use- "God's Hooks!", "God's buttocks!" - was this really a medieval term? I'm not sure- but I found it very amusing.

After Richard is killed at Bosworth, Farrington seems to leave the door open for Henry to have further adventures, as the new Tudor King saves him from the wrath of the Stanley's.

I was really pleased to discover that Henry's story continues under Henry VII- in "Tudor Agent", no idea what that will be like but I will be giving it a try.

The book is really well written, not sentimental, and very well paced. God's hooks!!- it was a really great read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant read!, 5 Oct 2013
A very well researched fictional account of the final days of Richard III. A gripping read, loved the main character, detailed descriptions and the humour. I would recommend this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ok for a light read, but not the best in its genre, 30 Sep 2013
A good book for reading on the train, but although the title implies the novel is about Richard III, he is in fact a very minor and rather thinly drawn character. Having a different person as a protagonist is fine, but there are long sections where we don't even get to see the king. The protagonist is pro-Richard and thinks he is a good man and not guilty of any of the 'crimes' whispered about in the court (and by agitators) but we don't see enough of Richard, his motivations or his personality, to make our own decisions as readers. The main female character gets to be a trifle annoying, as one other reviewer mentioned;sadly, it is true that men often cannot write women particularly well or realistically, and that is the case here to a certain extent.
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