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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating
I've read several of Bart Ehrman's books and enjoyed them all, but "Did Jesus Exist" I found less convincing, hence buying "Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth". This debunks much of Ehrman's thesis - which is really one atheist arguing with another. In this case a Christian trained Bible scholar (now atheist) arguing with Mythicists...
Published 11 months ago by Amazon Customer

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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Jesús de Rancho Cucamonga
Not sure what to say about this stuff. "Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth", edited by Frank Zindler and Robert Price, is a response to Bart Ehrman's book "Did Jesus Exist". The contributors argue that Jesus was a purely mythological figure, a position known as Mythicist. Unfortunately, the articles are talkative, emotional, nitpicky and...
Published 13 months ago by Ashtar Command


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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, 7 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth (Kindle Edition)
I've read several of Bart Ehrman's books and enjoyed them all, but "Did Jesus Exist" I found less convincing, hence buying "Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth". This debunks much of Ehrman's thesis - which is really one atheist arguing with another. In this case a Christian trained Bible scholar (now atheist) arguing with Mythicists.

"Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth" gets a little long-winded and repetitive but should be mandatory reading after "Did Jesus Exist". It is a shame that more Christians don't read such books.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Jesús de Rancho Cucamonga, 3 Nov 2013
This review is from: Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth (Kindle Edition)
Not sure what to say about this stuff. "Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth", edited by Frank Zindler and Robert Price, is a response to Bart Ehrman's book "Did Jesus Exist". The contributors argue that Jesus was a purely mythological figure, a position known as Mythicist. Unfortunately, the articles are talkative, emotional, nitpicky and extremely repetitive. There is no attempt at a real synthesis, and after a while it *does* get a bit annoying to read another sarcastic exposition by the ever-present editor Zindler. Nobody doubts that *he*, at least, is a real historical character! I consider the haphazard and eclectic character of this work to be somewhat unfortunate, since many of the Mythicist arguments are interesting in themselves. So are some of their methodological points. I might consider perusing the Mythicist literature at some later date, but this teaser trailer was a bit "under the ice" as far as I'm concerned...
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyabl and infirmative. Well worth the time and effort., 18 July 2014
This review is from: Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth (Kindle Edition)
This "...Quest For The Historical Jesus," has left a lasting impression and fuelled lots of readng, too.
It's been a few weeks since I read this (and I have read about a dozen books on history and religion/mythology in the interval).

Let's face it; whether this fellow existed is of purely academic interest because those sufficiently well-groomed in childhood by the god industry will continue to permit the multi-national enterprises gain more tax efficient revenue and unwarranted influence than certain companies we're all too aware of [puts down coffee, glances around room full of caffeine addicts]. But this is a valuable endeavour because it exposes the character and methods of the buybull business: for that, I wish to thank and support the continued endeavours of all the scholars who've striven to bring understanding to us all.

I'm still musing as to whether Nazareth [though I enjoyed their chart topper in the 1970s] was contemporary to the generally accepted era of christianities' (yes: plural) early gestation. Jesus seems, thanks to the observations and criticisms wihin this book, increasingly likely to be a marketeers' manufacture that was sculpted and polished during the 2nd and 3rd centuries - though I'd love to know when he became caucasian. I'll soon start searching for evidence that Islam's favourite son existed.
To inform these conjectures I've read Josephus, Hammurabi, and other more recent works including Price and Carrier. The lasting impression I gleen from spending this cash on Amazon is that religions are not to be relied upon as authorities: especially when seeking knowledge of religions! How strange it is that instituting claiming "Truth" are so poor at dealing with "truth."

When asking clerics or TV historians about Jesus and Mohammed, they always say "the concensus of historians is that they most probably existed" yet no evidence or sustainable argument ever supports this. Methinks we are finally learning to investigate the sacred big human names of Abrahamic religions and books like this fine collection of essays are doing an excellent job. Thanks to all involved.

Yes yes, please read this book and any others that spark your interest within its pages. Bart Erhman deserves credit, too, not least for the fact that his work provoked a response from and introduced me to several fine scholars. Though Carrier continues to recommend a number of Prof Erhman's titles, his seemingly uppish reactions cited in these pages reduce the likelihood I'll be buying them from anywhere other than charity shops and libraries.
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