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19 of 32 people found the following review helpful
on 14 April 2014
I bought this book in the kindle pre release for one very simple reason.

The author claims she spent the years between '91 and '93 standing about 15 yards across the road from me to work. I have met Moran at a conference and already knew this to be untrue, but I wanted to see if there were any verifiable facts at all in the book.

There were none...not one single mention of a familiar person or event. Not only did the author not work where she claimed she did, she apparently has no idea at all about the real people who did. She does not even know the material facts of sex work, at that time, itself.

This book is simple fraud and beyond that incredibly insulting and hurtful to the real people, not just sex workers, and clients, but Gardaí and residents who, among other things, were neither stupid, nor indifferent enough to walk on by while a drug addled child (sic) sold sex in front of them.

I should have posted this review right away, but I was scared of identifying myself and assumed Amazon would not let the review appear anyway, however I have now sworn out an affidavit in my own name which is online here:
[...]

I am happy to make notarised hard copy available to Amazon at any time upon request.
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6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 27 March 2014
The most important feature of Ms Morans book is its strong argument and analysis leading to its conclusion : buying of a persons body must be made illegal.
Her convincing arguments have made the pro-prostitution lobby very frightened, as we are seeing all over Europe a swelling opinion to support "the Nordic model" i.e. Criminalising the buying of another persons body.
The panic in the pro-prostitution camp has led to desperate attacks on Ms Moran. According to the blog of Ms Maggie McNeill, the self styled "Honest Courtesan" titled "Played out" of 11.03,
Ms Moran is a liar and a cheat who has never been a prostitute on the streets of Dublin ,
I recommend this book to everybody who sees the criminal forces living off female slavery as a
threat to our civilisation .
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 5 January 2015
Very quick service, especially before xmas, well done
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6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 29 April 2014
I read lot's of books like this - but this one is odd. The content is a cross between a journalistic narrative and one of a true story. The author, who herself identifies as a sex worker, just seems so polished, as if she is creating herself, rather than telling her story, I couldn't finish it. I don't know what it was, but this book is an odd read!
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8 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on 13 August 2013
I heard about this book through Irish media - I am living in London and was interested as the press it received seemed positive. I think the author has good intentions in that she wanted to prove that she hasemerged from a terrifying childhood and early adulthood with an education and a family against all odds. Her writing though is clunky. She has treid so hard to write what she probably considers "good English" when in fact it seems she has looked up Thesaurus for every single word. You can almost hear her saying "How can I make this sound more sophisticated." But actually the result is that it makes the reading more complicated and clunky than it needs to be. I am not saying this as an English graduate but as an ordinary reader who likes a good book. The repetition is really quite annoying. She will say the exact same thing in several different ways. To the reader you come to the conclusion that this is just padding out the already shallow story line. I flicked through most of it recognising the repetition each time and coming away none the wiser about this authors experience. There is nothing remarkable about the story. A tale of someone who had a hard knock life maybe but really unremarkable and quite boring in summary. I was expecting to be glued and unable to put the book down. I was happy to put it down in the end after about 2 hours of reading and finishing it with some skimming. The other annoying part is that in her efforts to sound educated and a bad girl come good... she seems to assume that she is an authority on the Human psychological condition. She might be an expert on her own mind but this does not mean she should feel that she is an authority on psychology. She makes so many assumptions that she thinks are fact and she loses credibility as a result.

Overall I did not gain anything from this book on any level; enjoyment/Insight/Catharsis/Intrigue - nothing. She should stick to improving her life without writing about it. I am sure she is doing very well. Good for her. Not a good read.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 1 July 2013
Not what I had expected, very interesting points made well worth the read. More then just a memoir, I would defiantly consider this reading this book as educational, enlightening and engrossing experience
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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 1 November 2013
This book started off really well and in the beginning I was completely gripped by her sad/shocking story. However as the book progressed I began to feel suffocated by the writers labouring of just how hard the life of a prostitute is and how horrible men are. She constantly tells us that there are no women who do this job willingly and that pretty much all men are the same. Having read other books on the subject and watched various documentaries I was inclined to disagree although in no way do I think its a glamorous profession. In fairness, the book is very well written although I actually took a break from reading it as it became tiresome as I felt it was so repetitive and the writer comes across as very bitter. Perhaps had she not laboured her points so often she would have created a greater impact.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 10 June 2014
Not very good it was told not as a story but by account and in her words.stopped reading it halfway through
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6 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 28 September 2013
I bought Paid For to read a true-life account of the sex trade. One person's experiences as a prostitute does not give them the right to generalise, in fact, it's downright arrogant to portray all prostitutes as being unwilling, coerced and so on, and in doing so plays into the hands of the rescue industries who seldom ask those to be rescued for their own opinions. The rescue industries prefer to 'Show Case' people like Rachel who snugly fit into the stereotype they require to be able to function as rescuers.
This book portrays the seedier side of sex work, supports the clichés, is in no way representative of modern-day sex workers and it is at least one decade out of date.
Readers beware, it is the experience of only one person.
There are no myths ripped apart and no enlightenment to be had; all that this book does is to reaffirm safe, middle-class egos of their own transient security. That is a horrible kind of self-titillation.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 17 February 2015
This book is by far one of the best books I have read in the anti-prostitution area... Rachael is very honest, real, deep, and authentic as a writer and as the person I imagine her to be through her writing!!! Thank you Rachael for your courage, insight, honesty, and passion. It was also fantastic to finally meet you in person!
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