Customer Reviews


15 Reviews
5 star:
 (9)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Secret War in a New World
In 1917 Russia fell to the Bolshevik Party and became the world's first communist state. In response, Britain's nascent intelligence service sent some of the bravest, maddest, and frankly suspect men in her employ to spy on Moscow.

Among them were Paul Dukes, who shed identities like snakes do their skin, Sidney Riley, who lived on a precipice but acted as if...
Published 11 months ago by M J Mann

versus
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Yes and No
No question, the author tells a good story and has built on relatively recent releases to The National Archives at Kew. A review ought to be by a professional historian, which I definitely am not. The running theme is the Comintern (Communist International) intent to stir up unrest in British India in the period 1919 to 1921, but this damp squib is sauced up with well...
Published 10 months ago by A. J. Roycroft


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't put it down., 17 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Russian Roulette: A Deadly Game: How British Spies Thwarted Lenin's Global Plot (Kindle Edition)
A well written and fascinating insight into an obscure area of British history. Did we really send 50,000 poison gas shells to use against the Russians
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars British spies and the Polish Army thwarted Lenin's global plot, 8 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Russian Roulette: A Deadly Game: How British Spies Thwarted Lenin's Global Plot (Kindle Edition)
Lenin/Trotsky had 3 choices after the revolution; invade west, invade south (India), do nothing. Lenin chose to invade west and was annihilated by the Poles in Aug/Sept 1920. It's a pity this book makes no mention of this. Otherwise it's an interesting read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good, 30 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Very revealing as regards historical fact. Also gives you a slant on today's events in Afganistan and India because of historic facts
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Useful, if biased, account of Britain's war against Russia in 1917-20, 13 Dec 2013
By 
William Podmore (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Russian Roulette: A Deadly Game: How British Spies Thwarted Lenin's Global Plot (Kindle Edition)
This fascinating book tells the story of how the British state did all it could to destroy the Russian people. It details the British plot to kill Lenin and the entire Bolshevik leadership, a plot in which the British diplomat, Bruce Lockhart, was implicated.

The British state armed and backed Kolchak's army, which included 7,500 Americans and 1,600 British soldiers.

Churchill urged all-out aggression against Russia, and insisted on the use of chemical weapons against the Soviets, saying they were `The right medicine for the Bolshevist'.

Wilfrid Malleson, commander of the East Persian Cordon, led an August 1918 raid into Soviet Turkestan, killing hundreds of Red Army soldiers. His forces tortured prisoners. After a massacre of Shias in Kandahar, his propaganda team distributed thousands of highly inflammatory leaflets fomenting strife between Sunnis and Shias. Malleson boasted, "We were able to make much capital out of this."

Minster of War Alexander Kerensky's failed offensive of June 1917 alone killed 500,000 Russians. So by taking Russia out of the war a year early, the revolution saved millions of lives. The two alliances of empires had killed at least 10 million people and wounded and maimed 20 million in order to crush rival empires: they had no right to criticise the Bolsheviks for changing a government by force.

The book is sub-titled `how British spies thwarted Lenin's global plot'. It should really be sub-titled `how the Russian people defeated the British Empire's attack'.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Read, 21 Jan 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Russian Roulette: A Deadly Game: How British Spies Thwarted Lenin's Global Plot (Kindle Edition)
Well written, such brave men forgotten in the mist of time. Should be a school subject so that people know how evil communism really was, and still is.
MHS
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews