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31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Connnelly continues to impress with an enthralling piece of crime fiction
The Gods of Guilt marks the fifth appearance of straight-talking defence lawyer Mickey Haller. He is the half-brother of LAPD officer Harry Bosch, who appears in previous novel "Black Box". The author rotates the characters well.It is interesting to find out how the characters differ in terms of personality. The approach of handling cases is interesting to explore.The...
Published 11 months ago by Mr. P. Datta

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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Liked it rather than loved it
I am a fan of Michael Connelly's books both the Harry Bosch and the Mickey Haller series. I prefer the Mickey Haller series as I feel he has written some of his best work in the courtroom setting. However, the fifth book in the Mickey Haller series doesn't live up to expectations.

For some reason, I get a rushed feeling about the book, especially as there were...
Published 11 months ago by Seán Óg


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31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Connnelly continues to impress with an enthralling piece of crime fiction, 9 Dec 2013
By 
Mr. P. Datta "Pritthijit" (Stockton on Tees, Teesside) - See all my reviews
The Gods of Guilt marks the fifth appearance of straight-talking defence lawyer Mickey Haller. He is the half-brother of LAPD officer Harry Bosch, who appears in previous novel "Black Box". The author rotates the characters well.It is interesting to find out how the characters differ in terms of personality. The approach of handling cases is interesting to explore.The Gods of Guilt involves a new case for the Lincoln Lawyer. The client has been accused of murder. Mickey has to handle difficult cases where the stakes are high. Winning tends to strongly favour the other side when handling criminal cases. Can this be proved wrong? There is a twist added to the plot. The victim in question was a former client of the attorney. The past haunts Mickey. It becomes clear, as it is linked to a previous case. The events leading to the present build up well and reach a thrilling climax. It would be not right for me to comment too much on the plot details, as it would act as a spoiler for readers and affect enjoyment. The latest offering shows how skillful he is as a crime fiction writer. The novel is meticulously researched and richly insightful particularly the court scenes. Being a former crime reporter, adds real credibility and authenticity to the story. Connelly draws us well to the characters. We learn a lot about Mickey Haller surfacing as a district attorney and on an unhappy family life. There is a personal touch to Mickey Haller's character, as he is trying to build a bonding with the daughter. We get to learn about the client and victim in question. The background of the characters paint a sinister and dark picture. The plot is gripping, enthralling and compelling throughout. It kept me glued. There is an element of surprise when least expected to the plot. The Gods of Guilt shows Connelly is never short of ideas when writing crime fiction. Past events of the district attorney makes the novel an interesting read, hence the title. Connelly is top of the game in crime fiction. The writing has reached a new level since introducing the character. He continues to impress a legion of readers. I would recommend the novel if you are looking for quality crime fiction. He is one of my favourite crime writers.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Liked it rather than loved it, 22 Dec 2013
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I am a fan of Michael Connelly's books both the Harry Bosch and the Mickey Haller series. I prefer the Mickey Haller series as I feel he has written some of his best work in the courtroom setting. However, the fifth book in the Mickey Haller series doesn't live up to expectations.

For some reason, I get a rushed feeling about the book, especially as there were a number of spelling mistakes and the odd missing word.

**Potential Spoiler**
In addition, I found Connelly's need to refer to the Lincoln Lawyer movie within the novel irritating as well as the necessity for the two half brothers to have some brief encounter.

The story in general is quite good and kept me interested for the most part. However, the ending left me feeling apathetic. I had been hoping for a twist or something big to finish off the book. But unfortunately it just petered out.
** Potential Spoiler**

Overall, if you are a Michael Connelly fan, you will more than likely like this book, but not be blown away by it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant but flawed, 22 Aug 2014
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This review is from: The Gods of Guilt (Mickey Haller Series Book 5) (Kindle Edition)
Another winner from Michael Connelly. Tense and gripping throughout. Loses a star for the numerous in character references to the film "The Lincoln Lawyer". Why authors do this is beyond me as it's unnecessary and spoils a pefectly good story. In Four Weddings and a Funeral when Andie MacDowell says, "Is it still raining, I hadn't noticed?", that one line ruins what had been, up to that point, a largely flawless film. It's a bit like that.

Clive Cussler went further and actually put himself in some of his Dirk Pitt stories. Cock.
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4.0 out of 5 stars solid, 14 Nov 2014
By 
Stanley Crowe (Greenville, SC) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Michael Connelly has taken some criticism for so obviously revisiting an old plot in order to come up with the fourth "Lincoln Lawyer" novel. This would be a problem only if the new story were badly put together and lacking in suspense and vivid action -- and happily that isn't the case. Here we have another procedurally solid piece of work that ingeniously ties together a current crime (involving the murder of a prostitute whom Mickey Haller had thought he put on the straight-and-narrow seven or eight years earlier) and a couple of crimes that go back to that earlier time frame and even further. Mickey's client is the prostitute's on-line pimp who (wouldn't you know) did in fact have an altercation with her shortly before she died, and Mickey takes the case because of his earlier concern for the prostitute ("Glory Days," in her heyday, but with other names since) and also because he comes to believe that the pimp, Andre La Cosse, is in fact innocent of the murder. Without giving too much away, I can say that the LAPD seems quite happy to see La Cosse go down for the killing -- and, of course, there is circumstantial evidence -- and that out-of-the blue Haller is forced to consider his relation to an older case that turns out to be related to La Cosse's too. He's forced to because he's subpoenaed -- and the serving of that subpoena is perhaps the only thing that the critic of plots might complain about. Isn't it a little TOO convenient that at this point, Haller is served with a subpoena about THAT case out of the many, many cases that he has been involved with? Connelly gets away with it, mainly because the relation of the two cases isn't immediately apparent, and by the time Haller is connecting the dots, we're hooked anyway.

The larger narrative in which Haller is operating is that of his own search for redemption. In an earlier case, he unwittingly brought about the deaths of innocent people, and his teenage daughter has refused to talk to him since. This kind of family drama for the less-than-perfect protagonist is pretty standard stuff now. The daughter's problems form no part of the plot -- she's never at risk -- and I think we could have done without this too-obviously "humanizing" dimension. But it's not a matter that need worry the reader too much. Connelly handles his complicated story and large cast of characters with aplomb, the dialogue is crisp, and the atmosphere of LA and its suburbs is sketched in with unobtrusive efficiency. The whole last section is La Cosse's trial for murder, in which, in good Perry Mason style, Haller aims not only to get La Cosse off the hook but to reveal the actual guilty party. Structurally in the story it's equivalent to the final chapters of those Agatha Christie novels in which Poirot or Miss Marple explains to those still standing how he or she figured out who did what and why and when. Such chapters are rarely dramatic, but Connelly's account of the trial IS dramatic, and it has its own twists and surprises. It's a very effective ending to an enjoyable thriller.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Hung Verdict on this book, 28 Oct 2014
I have a hung verdict on this book and so I am giving it 3 stars.
I found the first half of the book sluggish and not particularly well written. I am a big Michael Connelly fan and it pains me to say that I found the writing very simplistic and not descriptive or evocative. It just tells the story. That is not enough for me when you consider the superlative writing from James Lee Burke or other writers on the beat currently. For example some paragraphs ended with sentences like "That was not good." Surely he could have made more effort.

The book really picked up when it moved to the courthouse and I found that third of the book riveting and made me wish the whole book had been the courtcase and the shenaningans off hours after the courtroom drama each day.

So all in all I have mixed feelings about this book, mainly down to the very basic writing style. I didn't learn anything from reading it.
Also the references to 'The Lincoln Lawyer' movie were annoying. Perhaps Michael wants us to envision Matthew Mcconaughey's face every time we meet Haller in the book. Perhaps that was his way of not having to describe him in any way (I know he has appeared in previous books by the way).

For gripping courtroom drama I would recommend reading instead 'The Concrete Blonde' by Connelly. Now there's a great book that is well told and executed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The series goes from strength to strength, 5 Aug 2014
By 
Connelly can be a frustrating writer. His Bosch series and other books can be really good and sometimes really bad
In the Lincoln Lawyer he has obviously got a fresh impetus. This is the 5th in the series and once again challenges you both with how far one can push the American legal system but also challenges you to think of the hero as being moral.
this is a good read and keeps you intrigued to the end - In Haller Connelly has created an anti hero that you grudgingly admire
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4.0 out of 5 stars A murdered callgirl, another case for Mickey Haller, 12 Oct 2014
By 
This is the Lincoln Lawyer's fifth outing. A callgirl is brutally murdered in LA. In today's digital world Gloria had an online pimp who is charged with killing her and asks Mickey Haller to defend him. Eight years ago Haller represented Gloria on a drugs bust that led to a key cartel figure being put away for life. Now it seems the ramifications of that case are connected with Gloria's killing.

Haller's investigations are more legal than procedural, so these books have more talk and a bit less pace than the ones featuring Detective Harry Bosch, Michael Connelly's first and foremost creation. THE GODS OF GUILT has almost as many lawyer meetings and courtroom scenes as a John Grisham, but Connelly's trademark is the sudden moment of violence and the surprise piece of testimony that cracks a case. The trial scenes in THE GODS OF GUILT are as tense as those in TV's LA LAW (fondly remembered!); perhaps it's time the Lincoln Lawyer took to the small screen?

[Reviewer is the author of THE BEXHILL MISSILE CRISIS]
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5.0 out of 5 stars Best Haller novel yet, 27 Sep 2014
This review is from: The Gods of Guilt (Mickey Haller Series Book 5) (Kindle Edition)
The Mickey Haller series (this is number 5) is a cracking read, with this one being the best so far. No Bosch in this one (except a fleeting pass in the courthouse), but the usual characters.

Here he is defending a man accused of murder but claiming innocence, a case that takes him into dangerous territory and looks to his past relationship with the murder victim.

Like a John Grisham or Mark Giminez in story, the first person narrative lends itself to weaving in Haller's personal life that gives it a different dimension. The fact he is a recurring lead makes you really get into the character.

If you've never read any of the Haller series, then you can read this as a stand alone novel. However each book refers to events in others, so you may want to start with the first one - The Lincoln Lawyer. They're all good!

Read this as a stand alone, or
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4.0 out of 5 stars Typically good, but not his best, 20 Oct 2014
This is a typically strong Connelly novel, but one which doesn't reach the heights of his best.

The beauty once again lies in his brilliant plot development which always has the reader wondering what is going to happen next. It is a semi-legal mystery as Micky Haller delivers in the first person while he tries to get a man off a charge of murdering an escort.

The story is well-written and has the reader invested in both the tale and the other characters Connelly introduces. There are no real twists and turns though, so much ends up being unsurprising. I am also not sure why Connelly introduced Bosch in the most cameo of appearances either.

As a very minor aside, this is the first Connelly novel I've seen a couple of typos in!

Despite the good tale and mystery, I just felt this book lacked the punch of some prior novels.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining, 28 Nov 2014
This review is from: The Gods of Guilt (Mickey Haller Series Book 5) (Kindle Edition)
I do not normally read what I would term as mainstream fiction, but I received this in a Good reads first reads draw. I must say that I was pleasently surprised and entertained. The storytelling is smooth and polished keeping the plot moving along. The story moves along at the pace of a good film or TV series, keeping me guessing as to what would happen next.

The more I read, the more I wanted to read. It is a perfect commuter book, light reading but keeping you thinking as well as entertaining you. I believe that these stories are being turned into a TV series and I can see why.

If you are looking for an easy read that stimulates the brain cells, this will do the job well.

Ultimately I was left having enjoyed the book but then forgetting it and wondering what my next book would be.
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