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194 of 203 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly entertaining, almost definitive.
Pros - Lots and lots of footage of performances, behind the scenes stuff, and personal recollection of what it was like to be in a world dominating rock band. The magic comes across well, and it's easy to see what allowed the Eagles to have an album that outsold even Thriller. It's interesting to see how the various members have worn. Bernie Leadon is virtually...
Published 15 months ago by A. Webb

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An Airbrushed History
Anyone who is a fan of this band or just a casual observer will most likely know of their bumpy history. The firings of band members, fall outs, on stage threats etc are all well documented but the actual members of the band have never really talked about it. Books have been written - the excellent 'To The Limit' by Marc Elliot did a great job of telling the stories...
Published 13 months ago by S. G. Magnus


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194 of 203 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly entertaining, almost definitive., 26 April 2013
By 
A. Webb (Isle of Wight, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Pros - Lots and lots of footage of performances, behind the scenes stuff, and personal recollection of what it was like to be in a world dominating rock band. The magic comes across well, and it's easy to see what allowed the Eagles to have an album that outsold even Thriller. It's interesting to see how the various members have worn. Bernie Leadon is virtually unrecognisable, Randy Meisner looks so much older, but Don Felder seems to be fitter than ever and could pass for David Soul's younger brother. Don Henley, looks the dignified elder statesman of rock. But Glen Frey has the aspect of a retired boxer. Through it all the music shines, a magnificent shimmering thing, strongly evoking the endless Californian Summer that we all wish we'd lived.

Cons - Glen Frey. No one ever elected him leader, yet he assumes that position, and is on screen far too much, self aggrandising and basically claiming credit, whether it's due or not. He comes across as bullying and having an ego the size of his bank balance. There's also a distasteful glee concerning how much money was made, and an ironic comment from Frey to the effect that Don Felder - who was fired from the band - should not have been so concerned with how much money Frey was making. Apparently regardless as to whether it was money made from Feldler's contribution. The sense of greed and desire to control all is palpable.

In summary, this is history airbrushed, but still a must for anyone who grew up listening to and loved the music of the Eagles. Most areas of the band's long and at times tortuous story are touched upon, with some being explored in more depth than others. Everyone gets their say, including Bernie Leadon, Randy Meisner and Don Felder, the members who either walked away or were fired.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Documentary film making at its best offers the unabridged warts-and-all story of an American legend, 10 Aug 2013
By 
The Guardian (UK) - See all my reviews
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As documentary films go this one is exceptionally long at just over 3 hours, but even if you don't know this iconic American rock/country band very well you'll likely find every minute both informative and entertaining. The story is told in flashback by the various band members over the years and is joyous, witty, good-natured and deeply acrimonious by turns.

The narrative is roughly chronological from the band's beginnings as (believe it or not) Linda Ronstadt's backing group, through international success (and excess) in the mid-1970s, to 21st century revival & survival. Music producers, past managers and other professionals from the industry chip in with wry observations and anecdotes about the band and its famous internal tensions, particularly the ill-feeling between on the one side the main songwriters and core members Don Henley and Glenn Frey, and on the other side guitarist Don Felder who in 2001 after 26 years of increasing tensions was `fired' by the other members of the band - the only Eagle to suffer such indignity. Felder initiated a $50million lawsuit as a consequence.

There is plenty of truly great concert footage and fly-on-the-wall detail showing how the band composed its most famous numbers. Joe Walsh in particular shines brightly both as a musician and as a character, and his segments always entertain.

On deciding to `re-form' in 1994 following a 14-year hiatus, most of the band seriously wondered: "if we go back on the road and book some concert dates, will anyone show up?" They needn't have worried; their shows continue to attract huge audiences worldwide and younger generations of new fans have become converts in droves.

For the Eagles fan this will of course be essential viewing, but even for the viewer not particularly interested in rock music this film offers a highly entertaining three hours. You may never have bought an album or single by The Eagles in your life, yet will likely be amazed how many of their iconic songs you know and recognize. Theirs was one of the defining sounds of the 1970s and this American music will probably live forever in the hearts of millions.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Surround Sound Magic, 1 Jun 2013
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The 2-hour first part of this superb documentary (from childhood to The Eagles' first split in 1980), is an absolute blast. Produced by top documentarian Alec Gibney - with his longtime editor Alison Ellwood directing - it's a well-funded and structured telling of their saga which vividly contextualises the social and musical world that created The Eagles.

A little critical distance is the inevitable price you pay for this kind of access, and Glenn Frey's self-important perspective dominates too much, but everyone ever in and around the Eagles is interviewed, and the subliminal tensions are often all too obvious - even now.

The second part, which takes the story from that first split to the present day in just over an hour, is inevitably less riveting or important, but still full of fascinating insights and great music. Seeing just how rough Joe Walsh got before he cleaned up is pretty sobering, and there's a really unappetising moment near the end where Glenn Frey gloats over finally kicking Don Felder out of the band over money - followed by Felder getting discreetly choked-up over missing the band. You'd like to think that the inclusion of this scene in the final cut represents fearless honesty on the part of the director, but it also suggests a deep lack of self-awareness on Frey's part. You've got to love the bit too where Don Henley says of Irving Azoff "He may be Satan, but he's our Satan", and Azoff takes that as a compliment.

Sound and picture are a real credit to the Blu-ray format, and what really makes it, particularly if you have high-end home cinema, are the epic 5.1 mixes of all the music by former Steely Dan engineer Elliot Scheiner, the master of organic surround mixing. Every bit of music in the film, from old and new studio tracks to live concerts, ancient demos and even early Linda Ronstadt appearances at The Troubadour, leap out of the speakers in rich, thrilling new constellations. If only all documentaries could be like this.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant and engaging, 26 May 2013
By 
Mr. J. Cole "carnis98" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: History Of The Eagles [3 Disc DVD Deluxe Edition] [2013] (DVD)
In places it's a little glossy, jumping between recent interviews and archive footage. But it works. One of the best documentaries I've seen for a while.
The first part is definitely the more interesting of the two films. Seeing the early days and how,"easy" it seemed to come together was fascinating. I say easy, I'm pretty sure they worked hard, but it did seem like it all fall into place with out too much hassle. It also,shows how the band fell apart with no holds barred which is refreshing. They didn't give it a Hollywood ending.
The second film is then more recent history from the Hell Freezes Over TV special and subsequent tours. It's good, but the first one has the more interesting period covered with the classic albums. They touch on Don Felders sacking and he's still interviewed and involved in this film project which is how it should be. Sure he's not in the current Eagles line up, but he is an Eagle. They could've easily not involved him, but I think it's better for having him tell his side. I don't imagine he sees the others in person often as I think there is still a lot of hurt there.
The third disc is a 1977 live show. It's a good representation of the band at that moment in time. One of the last with Randy on bass. A lot of the concert footage is in the documentary as well.
There's also a small book within the box with some nice photos.

As a box set, it's one of the best presented I've owned.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An insightful documentary, 15 Jun 2013
This review is from: History Of The Eagles [3 Disc DVD Deluxe Edition] [2013] (DVD)
Having read the books of the great Don Felder and also Marc Eliot - they both raised the problems of the growing dictatorship of 'The Gods' namely Messrs Henley and Frey leading to the acrimonious split - I am glad to say that these problems are not 'airbrushed' out but openly discussed. Both books provide examples of the various altercations leading to the departures of Messrs Meisner and Felder,specifically. these are fully acknowledged and recounted in detail by Frey. I am glad to say that this great documentary, with great sound and archive footage, does acknowledge these issues. Sadly it does seem to confirm what I didnt want to really acknowledge - the dictatorship of Frey and Henley. It is all to evident, particularly in Part two following their reunion. it is noticeable that Walsh, Felder and Schmidt leave the handling of the Press to the powerhouse duo. Don Felder's pain at his firing is also all too evident, even today and I am surprised it has not been edited out. this leaves me thinking that this documentary is about as close to the truth as we will probably ever see. In fairness to 'the Gods' however, the issues around the pressures of coming up with materials to match the Hotel California body of work is made evident and one can empathise with Henley's obsession with perfection given the benchmark they had achieved. On this basis, one can develop a more balanced view of the tensions between Felder's writing and anxieties for more equality of space on the records and Frey and Henley's stringent standards. One can also better understand their desire to record a wider range of music having heard the contribution of Glyn Johns compared to Frey's early aspirations leading to the ultimate departure of Bernie Meadon. On a lighter note, the airtime given to Walsh provides some amusement with excellent archive footage provided on some of his shenanigans. It is also interesting to hear Irving Azoff's contribution. For any Eagles fan, this is a must.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Music will keep them alive, 1 July 2013
By 
A. Belcadenza (Sweden) - See all my reviews
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Pretty extensive documentary about the band. You recognise a few clips from earlier documentaries. Frey, Henley, Walsh and Schmit are telling the story, but also former members, producers and management people add their view of what happened. We see Frey and Henley develop from young musical greenhorns to competent songwriters and further into experienced negotiators for the band's second coming. Like most bands they grew differences along the road about musical direction and when royalties started rolling in, greed began to show it's ugly face. By the time they were recording the album "The Long Run" the camaraderie was crumbling and a serious brawl between Frey and Felder after a live concert finished it off.

Fourteen years later, they were picking up the pieces for an encore. Only Frey and Henley had had significantly successful careers and the financial cards would be reshuffled. When Frey looks boldly into the camera and reveals that he wouldn't have joined the band revival unless he and Henley were getting the largest cuts of the financial cake, it is obvious what made him tick at that point.

The fate of Felder is a bit sad. If he had just been content with sitting tight in the back seat with Walsh and Schmit, he would still have had one of the greatest musician jobs on the planet. He seems to have overvalued his own importance after coming up with the chord sequence for the iconic song "Hotel California", though he never was sitting at the same notch as Frey and Henley regarding vocal capacity and songwriting. His successor Steuart Smith may now be on the gravy train after having contributed to a handful of songs on the band's latest album.

I could have seen more clips from the band's creative process in the studio instead of multiple live shots of "Take It Easy". I could also do without insight about their greedy fights over money, cause it soils the overall picture a bit. Still, If you put that part of their history aside it is evident that the music is a strong force in their lives.
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71 of 80 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Band Apart, 29 April 2013
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One might think that should there ever be a Mount Rushmore of country rock, they may well etch the faces of the Eagles into the cliff side. However, they might need some time, for there have been quite a few comings and goings and line-up changes in camp Eagles over the years. This documentary ventures into the first chapter of the band's existence and provides evidence of the rifts, drifts, differences and fallouts that have occurred. It is probably fair to say that the Eagles are one of the most notoriously disharmonious of bands, who inexplicably and ironically orchestrate some of the most harmonious musical harmonies of any group since CSN. It is still a struggle today to meet a band that matches up vocally.

Although they may not straddle the earth with an omnipresence that marked their original inception and 1970s heyday, the reformed country rockers are still synonymous with classic radio and the rock album format.

Running at 2 hours, there is a lot of ground to cover. For a casual viewer, there is a mercifully breezy skip through respective childhoods and the pace is pushed with momentum towards the inspiring and prolific late-60s underground music scene of LA that homed residencies of Poco, Buffalo Springfield, Joni Mitchell, Jackson Browne, Linda Ronstadt et al. There is acknowledgment as to the creatively incestuous backdrop of the times, of the area and of the era. The sort that enabled artists to shift, move and collaborate seemingly at will. As the late 60s moved into the early 70s and success increased for the bulk of the aforementioned artists, it is clear that all look back with giddy rose-tinted glasses of nostalgia. The creativity was clearly as intoxicating as the drugs that they were recreationally self-medicating.

The Eagles were always a band that stood apart from their peers. They did so for a few reasons. One, is that they were massively successful in a way that the others could only dream of, another is that they had a steely core that made them efficiently consummate and business-like. Both of these aspects are highlighted by the documentary. The band reflect openly upon their motivations and inclinations, with a mix of new interviews and footage that dates back to the period. To see how much and how little they've changed is part of the joy of the feature. Around the mid-point, Joe Walsh arrives into the frame and is spotlighted in both the past and the present as an impassioned guitarist who is part-talent, part-court jester. His phrasing exudes a humorous hybrid of Keith Richards and Stephen Stills along with a healthy dose of his own breezy personality. For a music film, the tone is more or less consistently serious throughout, so his appearance offers some light hearted respite.

On the downside, there is not as much insight into the studio processes as a fan may want, but the band members are all given a fair hearing from both time periods and talk candidly about being in the epicentre of the Eagles whirlwind.

Understandably, Part One ends on a decisively sour note; their downfall and break-up. Although the pressures of topping the totemic Hotel California engulfed them all to a certain extent, it is clear that decisive fractures of the intragroup relationships had crippled the band. It is also evident that the distractions around the process was a demon that gobbled them up. Power may corrupt and absolute power may corrupt absolutely, but I am sure there is a pithy equivalent for success. Life in the fast lane had brought this group crashing into a ditch.

This is a tale that has enough acrimony to give Pink Floyd a run for their money. They may have been back together since 1994, as they will happily testify, but in case you're wondering, they only speak to Don Felder through lawyers. Some things don't change and won't be taken easy.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review of the extra DVD Live Concert at Capital Center '77, 3 May 2013
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This review is from: History Of The Eagles [3 Disc DVD Deluxe Edition] [2013] (DVD)
Better 36 Years late than never.........thats what I say.....LOL...
This DVD transfer I have viewed so far only on a decent Toshiba LCD screen and video/sound played through an excellent Sony system with the latest Magnetic Fluid speaker system;[ totally love this sound by the way- recommend it........gives music an edge.....]

The results I M H O are quite spectacular given the age of the recording,the mixing of the sound is masterful and it creates a vibrant punchy performance which stirs the soul and evokes a warm glow of admiration for this epic MOR country rock Monolith;harmonies are smooth & mellow,the solo voices are commanding and the instruments are where they should be - up front and centre on the big set pieces with the perfect balance against the glorious vocals.

Fingers Felder displays the supreme artistry of the guitar for which he is famed even yet - [you can sack him 23 years later messrs Frey & Henley but you will never ever replace him] ; his finesse against joe walsh's driving counterpart rhythm in the crescendo of Hotel California is truly a thing of beauty.....and Joe gives an edgy and mesmerising display of his unique guitar art during Rocky Mountain Way.

Frey reminds us that in the early days his voice was all honey and wine,you can almost hear the girls in the front row swoon as he croons away,his easy vibe most vividly displayed during his memorable rendition of Lyin Eyes...........and Henley just cuts the air with his incisive portrayal of the desert delusion anthem Hotel California.......and of course Randy Meisner brings the house down with his unforgettable rendition of Take it to the Limit.........that voice just blows me away..............

Totally Recommend this box set even for this live concert recording alone.........how and why they kept it under raps this long heaven only knows.....
maybe Irving Azoff and the boys retirement portfolio's took a beating in the credit crunch.........if we all buy this box set then it's problem solved I reckon.......how could you have it on your conscience if the gods of country rock ended up on the street...........LOL.....
mind you the busking to follow would be something to behold.wouldnt it.............LOL
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Cute One With The High Voice, 10 July 2013
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This review is from: History Of The Eagles [3 Disc DVD Deluxe Edition] [2013] (DVD)
I was a teenage girl in the seventies and always loved the Cute One With The High Voice and I still do! Watching the three discs it always seemed as if Randy Meisner was the shy one. Always hanging back, never pushing himself into the limelight, his wonderful voice making the harmonies so perfect, singing solo was a dream to watch and hear. I think Don Walsh was right in saying Randy didn't know how good he was. That he simply wasn't an Alpha Male. The other Eagles were so Alpha it almost hurts.

I love this three disc box set. The History of the Eagles is a fascinating story to watch. I shall watch disc three every day until it is worn out!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best band ever, 28 Jun 2013
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big eagles fan always wondered why they kept fighting.DVD a real eye opener some brilliant concert footage just loved the way the whole thing was done.Also reminded me what a fantastic band they are.Some people say their gigs are a bit boring because yheir music is too close to the recorded version I call that professionalism and NOBODY does it better
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