Customer Reviews

26
4.3 out of 5 stars
English Electric, Pt. Two
Format: MP3 DownloadChange
Price:£6.19
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 30 March 2013
Well, now, this is getting silly. First BBT have the audacity of releasing something which surpasses the current norm of proggy rocky music, and then they go and build on it with something deeper and more meaningful, and delightfully complex (that means you won't get it on first listen, folks...) Suffice to say, kick aforementioned wife and little ones out of the house for two hours (more if you can; always good advice) and put on both EE albums back to back, and re-live those halcyon moments of discovering music that Must Be Played Again and Again that we remember from...what? Moving Pictures was a looong time ago......and then play 'em again, cos you'll find something else you'll like. Once again, a hearty slap between the shoulder blades for those who made these cracking pieces of music possible. Nice one, folks!
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 10 March 2013
A few months after the release of 2012's Part One, here is another hour of Big Big Train's magnum opus. So, the question does arise: did they frontload the album, putting the strongest material in the earlier release? The short answer is no, but Part Two is indeed a slightly different beast and that means that a longer answer is worth having.

Part Two is a slightly softer, and more nostalgic, collection of songs, with two significant ballads in the shape of "Swan Hunter" and "Curator of Butterflies". These feel less like "progressive rock" and a little closer to AOR. Similarly David Longdon's excellent "Leopards" - a sweet and brief waltz with strings and a charming lyric - sounds very unlike anything heard previously from Big Big Train.

More in line with Part One are "Worked Out" and "Keeper of Abbeys", where inventive and enjoyable instrumental sections unwind out of initial sung sections. Tying Part One to Part Two is "The Permanent Way": which reprises some of the musical and lyrical themes of the earlier volume and provides a conceptual link.

For many listeners, however, the most striking track here will be "East Coast Racer", a soaring depiction of The Mallard (which holds the world speed record for steam locomotives). Although this track weighs in at fifteen minutes, it flies by at a considerable lick and the lyrical picture of the train that "burns with the substance of the land" provides a majestic & emphatic keynote for the double album as a whole.

Part Two lacks some of the edge of Part One, which may actually be preferable for some listeners, although I must confess that I find the second volume a little softer both musically and lyrically than, for example, The Underfall Yard.

Nevertheless, Part Two stands as a fine album on its own, justified both by its range of material and its generous running length. And an album that thoroughly deserves a five star rating.
33 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 11 April 2013
Having read some of the negative reviews here, I felt compelled to add a comment on this fantastic album. Quite simply, if you like melodic, cleverly arranged, well produced, well executed and uplifting rock music (with a progressive style), then you are going to love this album. To my ears, it's not quite as consistently strong as EE pt1, but it would be unkind to say there's much difference in quality. My favourite track is probably East Coast Racer, but I love every track. For me, this is one of those albums which a) I keep going back to frequently and b) I find it difficult not to play from beginning to end in one sitting. I feel the same way about EE part 1 and UY. So, it's only my opinion, but I'm in the camp that says these two albums (and UY) will go down as classics (whether regarded as progressive rock or not). By the way, I sincerely hope EE pt2 is released on vinyl by Plane Groovy records. Their pressing of EE Pt1 is absolutely sublime and breathes even more emotion into an already fantastic musical experience. Congratulations BBT and thank you. PS How about a tour!?
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 19 May 2013
Look - I REALLY admire these guys and this is NOT a bad album.
However - by calling it English Electric Pt2 direct comparisons with EE1 are unavoidable.
To my ears it does not have the same consistency; it doesn't connect in the same way - 'to my ears', it doesn't have the same charm.
I like it - oh yes! These guys are real professionals and craftsmen but you cannot hit the mark all of the time.
EE1 "hooked me" from the word go, this one doesn't have that immediate effect.
EE1 WAS 5 stars but can you really complain about a very respectable 4 stars?
Big Big Train are a force to be reckoned with - accomplished and proficient. Glad I bought it? YES!!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on 4 April 2013
Big Big Train have been around for 2 decades now in one form or another. The last 4or 5 offerings have slowly but surely built on a solid progressive rock base and founder members Greg Spawton and Andy Poole have attracted quality musicians as part of the main band and guest appearances to produce some outstanding music. the Unerfall Yard was perhaps the biggest leap forward, a superb album that was largely admired. Far Skies Deep Time also contained some notable gems, but for me the English Electric albums have planted big Big Train right at the pinnacle of British music. There is a maturity about the songwriting that belies the prog label, East Coast Racer is up there with some of the progressive rock classics, the arrangement is spellbinding and Nick D'Virdilio's drumming in the middle section makes you feel like you are listening to the steam train thundering through your listening room. Some beautiful songs all the way through the album, Worked Out and Keeper of Abbeys are probably the other stand out tracks for prog fans, but the beauty of the other songs means that for this listener, the band have arguably taken forward the legacy of pre-mainstream Genesis et al and produced music that deserves a much wider audience. Seriously great album, ignore reviews from prog diehards who think every track has to be loud, long and rambling.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
I can't quite work out if Big Big Train are slow workers or ruthless mercenaries. This is a very pleasant album in it's own right, but if you listen to both Part I and Part II together, it all makes much more sense. The two albums together provoke memories of Genesis, Gentle Giant, Caravan and Tull, with suggestions of Yes as well. Some wonderful songwriting and musicianship (you just don't hear enough banjo these days), but if you like any of the aforementioned bands, you wouldn't be to disappointed with these. Just one tip, buy 'em both!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 27 August 2013
Lyrically superb. Who would have thought of writing such a marvellously evocative set of lyrics about the Mallard. Then there is the music. The quality of writing, imagination and total mastery of their instruments is breathtaking. Worth the entry price just for "East Coast Racer" This is a quite stunning piece which almost brought me to tears.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 27 April 2013
Some pretty mixed comments on here for this release which is fair enough - each to their own and all that. I guess it at least partly depends on what other music you like and where you are coming from musically. I have pretty broad tastes but for me this is their strongest work, being both excellently played and well-written. I think all the musicians are on fine form and East Coast Racer is totally mesmerising - I can't stop playing it. This is the first BBT CD that I want to play over and over, as I needed to be in the right frame of mind to really get into the others. A firm 5 stars from me.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 12 October 2013
I didn't take to English Electric initially, with part one. Somehow though I suspected it was worthwhile persisting. So I copied my CD's into ITunes and listened to them repeatedly on my phone, and played the CD's in the car.

...and

They are just tremendous. Packed full of memorable melodies, great playing, and most of all some genuine effort in making them. Although the analogy with early Genesis music is hard-to-escape, I rather think the music echos Anthony Phillips' (the first Genesis guitarist) work, perhaps beefed-up.

Can't wait to see the band live.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 11 April 2013
As it has been already said this album is a lot more mellower than their past few; however it does not detract from the quality of the musicianship, superb orchestration throughout from the proggy East Coast Racer, the softer Swan Hunter and Worked Out, the poppy Leopards, the epic Keeper of Abbeys, the beautiful Permanent Way and the mellow Curator of Butterflies. This is definitely their Trespass album; which may not be as diverse as Part 1 or The Underfall Yard but is just as stunning in a different and unique way which only Big Big Train have the talent to do.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Wassail
Wassail by Big Big Train
£2.99

The Underfall Yard
The Underfall Yard by Big Big Train
£4.49

Make Some Noise EP
Make Some Noise EP by Big Big Train
£2.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.