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14 Reviews
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hooked From the Start!
As a Scotsman who has been brought up in a family with Masonic connections, I wished to read this book as a means to develop more of an understanding of the Craft. I was not disapponted - as my review title suggests, the introduction had me hooked - the author's travels to the rugged Argyll area and his discoveries there had me slavering for more (and had me visiting the...
Published on 25 Sep 2006 by bloo_toon_red

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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Quite Informative
This is the first book that I have read on the subject of Freemasonary and its history. I did enjoy the book and I did find it informative. However, it did get somewhat tedious in places. I felt that the book lacked in terms of balance, in some sections names and references are just reeled of, with nothing to interest the reader or captivate the imagination!
All in...
Published on 20 Oct 2001


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hooked From the Start!, 25 Sep 2006
As a Scotsman who has been brought up in a family with Masonic connections, I wished to read this book as a means to develop more of an understanding of the Craft. I was not disapponted - as my review title suggests, the introduction had me hooked - the author's travels to the rugged Argyll area and his discoveries there had me slavering for more (and had me visiting the very area only a few days later). This was the personal hook that reeled me in for the remainder of this fascinating story.

As with "Holy Blood, Holy Grail", it appears that certain "convenient" connections are made, making the reader more than a little bit sceptical at the truth of the story. However, I would be willing to wager that a substantial proportion of the research is close to the mark.

From the Temple of Solomon through to WW2, you can make your own mind up as to how influential the hermetic societies are upon reading this book.

For anyone interested in the roots of the Masonic Craft, I would recommend this highly, as I am quite sure the Grand Lodge of Scotland has done also.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Informative and Unbiased Look into Freemasonry, 1 Jun 2001
This is the first book written by a non Freemason that examines historical routes of freemasonry without politcal or biased opinions. It is factual and well researched examining the Templars arrival in Scotland and Ireland and possible reasons through to modern day America via the civil war and the Anglo French conflicts to other theatres of war. Well worth buying and reading a good inclusionin any Masonic library.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Quite Informative, 20 Oct 2001
By A Customer
This is the first book that I have read on the subject of Freemasonary and its history. I did enjoy the book and I did find it informative. However, it did get somewhat tedious in places. I felt that the book lacked in terms of balance, in some sections names and references are just reeled of, with nothing to interest the reader or captivate the imagination!
All in all not a bad book, I did come away learning something on the subject. To sum up informative, but, a little tedious in places.
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40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Mason to Even the score, 17 Aug 2003
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S. Timmis "stevetimmis" (Oxfordshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This book is far more accurate than it is inaccurate. It looks hard to find the truth of the history of Freemasonry, and I think the tentative conclusion that can be drawn from reading it is that the Craft does more good than harm in the World, but at times Masons have been badly divided among themselves and very heavily politically motivated.
Essentially the authors argue that Modern Freemasonry was held in trust by the Sinclair family in Scotland for generations. That Scotland became the home of Freemasonry because the Scotland of Celtic orientated Robert the Bruce was a safe haven for Templars at the time of the dissolution of the Order. They further argue that Freemasonry played a major role in the development of a World Wide Civil rights movement and was a major force in the shaping of the political structure of the Modern USA. It is not a bad thesis, with easily as much in it to make Mason's proud than ashamed.
I am writing this article to give the book a good rating because I amm somewhat ashamed of fellow Mason's bad-mouthing the efforts of people to elucidate Masonic History while English Grand Lodge insists Freemasonry started in 1717, if not 1770. This stance, and Masonic reviewers at this site, are making the Craft a laughing stock.
Baigent and Leigh should be praised for their efforts, and if Craft members think what they have done is not good enough then they should do better themselves - and if you do - be honest!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Terrible Book, 6 Nov 2013
This book is typical of Baigent's work; badly referenced, badly written and not very factual. There is no evidence what so ever for the medieval Knight Templar order surviving to establish Freemasonry, and the book is speculative at best.
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4.0 out of 5 stars What really happened to the Grail?, 27 Dec 2013
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H W. E. Siviter "billysiv" (Staffordshire) - See all my reviews
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The Grail is buried in a cave under Alderley Edge, Cheshire.
"The Dark Men od Biddulph Moor", tells the true story.
The Dark Men Of Biddulph Moor (illustrated)
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4.0 out of 5 stars I love the Scottish specifics, 8 Dec 2013
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Mr. I. Ballie "Freethinker" (Dundee, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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You'll need this book if you want to understand how [some] of it comes together, fantastic, I love the Scottish specifics’ …………. 10/10
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 4 Sep 2013
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Anthony D. Rickard (London) - See all my reviews
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I should have read this years ago; no-nonsense exposition of known history, skilfully separating fact from myth. Sad indeed that Bro Baigent is no longer with us.
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3.0 out of 5 stars The Temple and the Lodge, 27 April 2013
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This book is very informative and of great use to thos studying The Knights Templar, but as a entertaining read I found it a bit heavy going.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars speculation, not history, 10 Sep 2009
By 
DayTripper (Glasgow, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This book is at times an entertaining read, but it is nothing more than historical speculation with no real evidence to back it up.
There are some graves in Scotland that may be of Templers who fled persecution. Therefore, there were Templers at Bannockburn and helped the Scots win the battle. It was probably the Templers as Robert the Bruce has been excommunicated, so obviously they sought sanctuary in Scotland. At a battle hundreds of years later, a fallen soldier has a Templer tunic under his battledress; ergo there have been active Templers in Scotland since the 1300's. Masonic lodges appear in Scotland centuries later with some similar use of symbolism than the Templers, so therefore, the Templer legacy in Scotland had in hand in the foundation of Scottish Freemasonary.

The West coast of Scotland (where I have spent my whole life) becomes a place shrouded in mystery as some villagers are reluctant to discuss local graves with the strangers (This conjuours up images of villagers in Hammer Horror films being reluctant to discuss Count Dracula's castle). Rather than being secretive, there is just as much chance they know nothing about them.

If you want history, this book is not for you. However, if you enjoy wild speculation when no evidence exists, then it can at times be entertaining.
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