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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is what Dystopian YA should be!
I bought Angelfall spur on the moment because I could feel myself falling into a bit of book funk,but I really liked the sound of the premise and the reviews behind it was very positive even though I am wary on the angel theme especially for YA books but I WAS BLOWN AWAY.

OMG - I was so sucked in with this book that I totally spent the rest of the day finishing...
Published on 29 Dec. 2011 by Amazon Customer

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Be prepared to buy the next books if you want any pay-off...
Very interesting concept and the set-up in the first few chapters was enough to get me engaged. But over time, the grip of the story loosened and my interest began to wane. The rambling, inner monologue of the toughened teenage girl in the post-apocalyptic world isn't as original as some reviewers are suggesting (Hunger Games?), nor is the angst and teenage sexual tension...
Published on 18 Jun. 2013 by Mr. J. Ferguson


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is what Dystopian YA should be!, 29 Dec. 2011
I bought Angelfall spur on the moment because I could feel myself falling into a bit of book funk,but I really liked the sound of the premise and the reviews behind it was very positive even though I am wary on the angel theme especially for YA books but I WAS BLOWN AWAY.

OMG - I was so sucked in with this book that I totally spent the rest of the day finishing the book because I was so engrossed with the story. Penwyn Young is not only struggling to survive the post apocalypse when invading angels from heaven reap their wrath on earth, but she has to tackle coping with her mother's paranoid schizophrenia and her sister's disability in a harsh world. When her sister is abducted by an angel she is forced to team up with another angel, Raffe whose wings have been cut off has become an outcast. On a quest to get his wings back and for Penwyn to find her sister, they encounter a world filled with cannibals, an emerging human movement and angels who would love to kill Raffe on sight.

Penwyn is a fantastic heroine, resourceful, clever and determined to protect her family, I loved the scenes she shared with with her mother, which were uncomfortable and heartbreaking as well as with Raffe whose relationship evolves wonderfully throughout the book. I loved how it evolved and guess what? No emoness or moping in sight, now this is how to do a do a YA!

This was a YA that surpassed my expectations, gritty, dark and unapologetic chilling especially with the climactic ending that definitely gave me a cold chill down my spine, however there is scenes of humour and great diaglogue which really helps to balance the stark tone. This was seriously one of the best books I read this year and Susan Ee has definitely become a break-out author for me! I can't say enough good things about this book if you loved Enclave by Ann Aguirre, or the The Hunger Games, then you will definitely love this book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Be prepared to buy the next books if you want any pay-off..., 18 Jun. 2013
By 
Mr. J. Ferguson (Sunderland, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Angelfall: Penryn and the End of Days Book One (Kindle Edition)
Very interesting concept and the set-up in the first few chapters was enough to get me engaged. But over time, the grip of the story loosened and my interest began to wane. The rambling, inner monologue of the toughened teenage girl in the post-apocalyptic world isn't as original as some reviewers are suggesting (Hunger Games?), nor is the angst and teenage sexual tension with a not-quite-human (Twilight?).

Where there is an element of originality is in the Angelic invasion, their politics, their culture, etc. There was disappointingly little back-story to this, with the novel instead focusing too much on the over-described relationship between Penryn and Raffe.

While a good writer of a series of books can write each individual book with a start, middle and end, It was clear early on that the author was intending this book to be a scene-setting, Chapter 1 in a longer series. In that sense, I started to resent the fact I knew there would be no pay-off at the end of the book, and I am not sure I am invested enough to wait for the next one. It would have been much better if this had been framed as a standalone novel, then we could have explored this world in more detail in future books.
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82 of 89 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Game Changer, 30 Jun. 2012
By 
Kate Phillips "Kate" (Southampton, England) - See all my reviews
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I do not know what I was expecting when I bought this book. It had a pretty cover and was going cheap so I thought I would give it ago. I had heard good things about it, I thought I might like it but I wasn't expecting to be blown away...yet I was. Consider me officially blown.

Angelfall is one of the most exciting books I have read in a long time. It has a lot going for it. The plot line is mesmerizing you live and breathe it from the very beginning until the end. It is a compelling story of family, sacrifice and love.

I found the characters incredibly engaging. Penryn is a strong female lead, a lot stronger than most girls you see in Young Adult books. The lengths she is prepared to go to for her sister is something we have seen before (see The Hunger Games) but it still proves to be touching. Raffe, the lead male character, is also strong and the perfect partner for Penryn as she travels across a ruined America. They are characters that are easy to get behind; easy to like and before you know it you realise you are caring about them.

The romantic relationship between them is a slow burner and manages to get under your skin even though nothing really happens. In fact calling this book a `romance' book is probably lying. There is little to no romance in this at all, just a shadow of what is to come in future books in the series.

Angelfall does get a few things wrong. There are a few times where Ee stretches reality a little too thinly and it becomes a little hard to believe. These moments are few and far between and do not greatly affect the reading experience. Also her world building is a little bit unbelievable. In six weeks America seems to have deteriorated an awful lot. (However, I haven't been through an apocalypse so how would I know)

What Ee does with this book that many other authors struggle with is her scene building. From a lonely feather falling from the sky to the image of Angel Gabriel hovering over an under siege Jerusalem. Every scene is crafted with beauty that makes for a mesmerizing experience for the reader. I think it is the main reason that the book is almost impossible to put down.

Another thing Angelfall has going for it is the brutality and violence. It really pushed the boundaries of how brutal, gory and violent a YA should be. In my mind it was all justified and was there for the benefit of the story but those with a weaker stomach might find parts of this book disturbing and sickening. This is no walk in the park this is a world full of tragedy and darkness. It holds nothing back and shows you a place that is ripped apart and dyeing. It is probably the most violent and gory Ya book I have read.

I could not recommend this book more highly. It is one of the best books I have read this year and is in my top three YA books of all time. I loved it, loved it, loved it and I literally cannot wait for the next book in the series, if it is anything like this then I know I am in for one hell of a ride.
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57 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A real page-turner, 5 Dec. 2011
By 
delphine "meryllon" (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I found this book through Goodreads, where it was one of my recommendations. Originally, I had just requested the Kindle sample, but as soon as I got to the end of the very generous excerpt, I absolutely had to read the rest. (On the issue of samples: quite often, I've noticed that the quality of the writing dips seriously after the end of the sample. No such problems here!)

Susan Ee has created a compelling mix of characters: Penryn, the young heroine, is responsible for looking after a paranoid mother and a sister in a wheelchair. The world has been engulfed by the Apocalypse (no, really), and as the novel opens, they are desperately trying to leave their wrecked apartment block and, as darkness falls, head for the hills -- despite the danger of marauding gangs and patrols of the Angels who have brought human civilisation crashing down.

That's when they witness five of these powerful beings ganging up on a single, injured Angel. Penryn intervenes on the side of the underdog, and that's when her problems start. Her crippled sister is kidnapped by the Angel gang, her mother disappears, and she is left with the mysterious angel Raffe, who seems on the point of death.

How Penryn and Raffe set out to San Francisco to find the angels' aerie, how they encounter the human resistance movement en route, and what they find when they get to the aerie (much grisliness here, though not of the truly gross variety) -- all these events unfold over the rest of the book. And all the while, we're unravelling more of the mystery of Raffe and the other Angels, starting to find answers to why they're on earth, who they are, and what they're doing here, especially in the aerie's basement -- and some of those answers are deeply troubling.

The novel is very well presented on the Kindle; there are none of the formatting errors that seem disappointingly common. It's also been well edited; I only discovered one instance of "site" instead of "sight" (probably) and one instance of what I suspect is an editing mishap: "The shape of the wings are not shaped like a bird's wings" -- I imagine "shape of the" should have been deleted there. (Okay, okay, I know I'm nitpicking.)

One more word on the Angels. There is (or there was) a Gabriel, there's an Uriel and a Beliel, and possibly it helps to know a little (arch)angel lore. But one of the angels is an agnostic, and overall they seem a) far from perfect and b) not to know what they're doing. In a different book, they might simply be aliens.

This is a thoroughly original book, well written, well paced, with fascinating characters and overall very enjoyable. I can't wait for the next one.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Certainly worth the hype.., 4 Jun. 2013
By 
Ms J. Atkins "Loxias" (Oxford, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Angelfall: Penryn and the End of Days Book One (Kindle Edition)
I have a 1.5hr commute into London every day so I read a lot of books. I saw Angelfall advertised on a poster in a tube station and when I finished another book I thought I might as well read it. To be honest I wasn't expecting a great deal - I thought it would be cheesy YA romance which I'd forget about a couple of weeks later. I also wasn't sure about the angels - I'm so fed up with vampires I thought going down the religious angel line was even more of a mistake.

Well, I was completely wrong. This book more than exceeded my expectations in every aspect. It was gripping from start to finish, so much so I actually missed my train stop because I was so engrossed in it. The author has created characters you actually care about, from Penryn (our strong-willed and human heroine with her occasional girly traits) and Raffe (our arrogant and tormented angel), to Penryn's crazy mum and the band of resistance fighters. Keeping all the action in a fairly small geographical location (in this case the San Francisco area) means the author can give us a good picture of the post-apocolyptic landscape without bringing complete doom on the world. I found myself rooting for almost everyone the whole way through, and I wanted to know more about everyone. I guess there is only so much space in one book, but I'd like to have heard how the resistance had gotten together and a bit more about the hierarchy of the angels.

This book has clearly been written as the first in the series - not least because there are way too many loose ends to be completely finished. I know for certain that as soon as another comes out I will be out there buying it.

Whether you are interested in YA titles or not (usually I'm not, although I did like The Hunger Games series) it is definitely worth giving this book a try. It is not a long read (more's the pity!) but you'll be hooked...
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63 of 69 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not for me..., 4 Jun. 2013
I can see why this is an internet sensation. It plunges you straight into an America ravaged by destructive angels - the descriptions of streets jammed with empty cars and littered with abandoned mobile phones are haunting, and it's action-packed right from the start. Add to that an incredibly hot angel-guy, Raffe, and Penryn, the narrator, a tough girl with a mentally ill mother who has to protect her sweet and vulnerable younger sister (a formula straight from The Hunger Games), and you have a page-turner.

However, I found Penryn's inner monologue a bit overwritten (she describes every... single... thought process, and sometimes even her breathing. Argh), and the immediate sexual chemistry between her and Raffe - the love/hate power struggle, the biting repartees, the endless reminders of his physical beauty - predictable, tired and even a bit icky, eg. when applying blister plasters to his pus-and-blood-y feet (a 4-page scene): "I rub my finger firmly around the adhesive to make sure it won't fall off. He inhales sharply and I can't tell if it's from pain or pleasure. I'm careful to keep my eyes down on my task." Ew.

The plot compels you on, but I must admit that after the introduction of a pair of mischievous, entrepreneurial, red-headed twins (hello Weasleys!) who speak as one and call themselves Tweedledum and Tweedledee, and a one-dimensional bitchy girl character with whom she has a wet t-shirt wrestle, I started skim-reading. The denouement is dramatic, and the revelation of what the angels are up to is dark and certainly original, with a cliffhanger ending ready for book two.

If you're looking for a fast read with drama and chemistry, and don't mind the occasional narrative clumsiness or cliché, then you might enjoy this; it just wasn't magical enough for me.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Emotionally shattering, 7 Mar. 2014
Review by Grace - Year 7

It’s 6:30 am as I write this. I have just finished reading Angelfall, a dark urban fantasy novel. I have read the book over the past three days.

Angelfall begins at a time of a post-apocalyptic event. It reminded me totally of a book namely “The Road” by Cormac McCarthy (2006).
Following on from an ‘Armageddon’, where angels attempt to conquer our human civilisation, the book is emotionally shattering. Angelfall affirms the pricelessness of what we as humans take for granted, the here and now of our ‘civilised’ lives. Angelfall creates a ‘nightmare’, which through Penryn’s character and life experiences highlight the cruelty and ugliness of some people’s lives; where they have been born into a situation not of their making. But how, despite this, everyone has something to lose…..Attachment and friendships are with us all, the fragile aspects of these concepts are highlighted in Angelfall.

The reader is never really told why the ‘invasion of angels’ has taken place.

One of the main characters in the book is Penryn, a tough but very vulnerable young lady, vulnerable emotionally prior to the angel invasion. Penryn’s mother is a fascinating character – a schizophrenic who alternates between a knowledgeable human being to a destructive, crazy wild animal.

The storyline follows Penryn as she seeks to save her younger sister who is wheelchair bound and has additional needs. Penryn’s younger sister is abducted by the angels.

The details and peculiarities of the characters are developed throughout the book. This is further enhanced by different layers of thematic events and past histories that all impact upon the apocalyptic situation as it unfolds. The storyline ignites the reader’s desire to investigate and visualise themes in the storyline, such as Penryn’s history with her mother; Penryn’s sister’s disposition and how all this came about as well as the reason for and the actual occurrence of the apocalypse; not to mention Raffe’s uniqueness and why he differs from his fellow breed of angels. The reference to Biblical matters, such as the crucifixion can be overpowering when reading the book, leaving myself, as a reader, feeling sad that such biblical events ever took place.

Penryn’s love and admiration for Raffe and his qualities builds gradually as the storyline progresses. The turmoil of a ‘love/hate’, ‘trust/non-trustworthy’ relationship is communicated to the reader. The development of the relationship over time for Penryn is projected by the author rather ironically as the author tends to use this in contrast to Penryn’s mother’s relationships, that are built on “obsessional love at first sight – immediate and short lived”.

The book is full of anguish, graphical repulsion and dare I say ‘horror’ evoking. The consistent use of abusive language and swear words in the text further enhances the hostile manner the book is written in. As such, this is one of my main reasons for saying, as a 12 year old reading this book, I appreciated that I had the ability to feel grounded in my own well-being. I clearly felt that if the book were made into a film, as the “Road” was, that it would definitely reach a PG rating of 12 years plus age range – and even this, pending the stability of the viewer, could challenge a lot of teenagers depending on their life experiences. The book has its moments of gore, deep grimness and bloody graphics, but, what I found more challenging was the realisation that other teenager’s lives could mirror the reality of having a parent with mental health problems and a sibling with complex medical and learning needs. These teenagers are real and exist and struggle in ‘our’ world today – just as Penryn portrayed to the reader in the book. The stark reality of this really does hit emotive feelings within me.
A lot of young teenagers and children in our world have had forced adult responsibilities placed upon them – often as a result of an absent parent and/or parental mental health needs. But despite this, the attachment they maintain with their parent is strong and the parents need to remain in contact is often present. Penryn’s relationship with her mother in the book highlights the turmoil of such needs from both parties perspective.
Penryn’s values, personality and unexpected skills all come together in a manner that displays her with a ‘hidden heart’. Penyrn is not projected as a superhuman…her hardships are fully exposed. Penryn becomes a very likable and admired character for her strengths and human weakness. Her loyalty to her family is something all people can relate to. But Penryn’s experiences are better kept in this fictional context than brought into reality.
The focus of survival of the fittest is a clearly highlighted aspect of the book. The nature of violence is presented in contrasting ways e.g. how Penryn’s sister gained her injuries compared to the fighting within the camp to alleviate tensions and frustrations in a controlled manner.
The use of a narrative style of writing, in the first person and present tense, I feel helps keep the reader encapsulated and wanting to read on. The pace when reading makes you feel as if the events are actually happening – almost outside your door – even though you know this would be absurd, given the fantasy element of the story. This makes the book exciting and engaging to read. As the reader, I felt often, that I was Penryn.

Raffe, by contrast, as a character is initially portrayed as an outcast angel, but an angel one would not want to associate with. However, as the reader reads on, and analyses Raffe’s character, you see Raffe’s sense of humour and very playful, young personality. His banter with Penryn further underlines his ‘playfulness’. He presents, at times, as human, which causes confusion for Penryn. He protects Penryn in much the same way that Penryn protects her family. Penryn’s and Raffe’s relationship can be tense, a confused partnership at times, but with an element of romance present. Penryn’s and Raffe’s ‘journey’ alone, maintains the reader’s interest. How they gradually develop a trustworthy relationship with mutual respect is intriguing. Then added to this the ‘why’ questions you ask regarding the circumstances they face together adds further intrigue for the reader to explore and ponder.

The books ending still left me with the question as to why in the first place did the angels carry out this apocalypse on human society. However the ending is abrupt - perhaps planned to lead to that 2nd book? After all it leaves itself open to a sequel. However, I’d think I would wait until I was a couple of years older before reading any sequel given the language and visual imagery of this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Complex and scintillating fantasy, 18 July 2011
By 
Sandra O. Nathan "Sandy Nathan" (Santa Ynez, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I was captivated by Susan Ee's Angelfall. There are so many things to like about this book. It takes place months after an Armageddon instigated by angels. Angels are the bad guys? Yes. That's only one of Angelfall's quirky elements. The characters are endearing and fascinating: The tough/tender heroine Penryn. Her mentally ill and very dangerous mother. Disabled sister. Absent father. And the hunky angel, Raffe, who may or may not be a good "guy".

None of these are stereotyped or predictable. Which is so refreshing. I am not a fan of popular fiction. The current preoccupation with faeries, vampires, werewolves, witches, and angels leaves me cold. But this book didn't.

Superbly well-written and perfectly paced, Angelfall could be used as a model of good writing in any creative writing seminar. The action never ceased as the plot unfolded to reveal unpredictable scenes and situations. Like the politics of angel society. Humans preparing to revolt against angels. And what those angels are up to in San Francisco.

The author's use of place enthralled me. I was born in San Francisco and spent most of my life on the San Francisco Peninsula. The book is set in my old stomping ground. So when she describes Penryn and company heading for Page Mill Rd and crossing El Camino in Palo Alto, I could visualize the scene exactly. The same was true for her locations on Skyline and in San Francisco. When authors site a story in a physically real place that I know, I get really perturbed if the location isn't portrayed correctly. Ee does this perfectly.

I'm looking forward to the next installment of the Penryn & the End of Days series.

I highly recommend this book for adults who like intense fantasy with horrific elements and violence. I didn't find either disturbing, but some might. I would recommend this for older Young Adults.

The Angel & the Brown-eyed Boy (Tales from Earth's End) Winner of the Gold Medal for Visionary Fiction in the 2011 IPPY (Independent Press) Awards (USA)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A bit disappointed, 8 Jan. 2013
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Gave it a go on the basis of the ratings and the fact it seemed like it had a good base concept...it was fine I guess it just never really grabbed me sadly. The internal commentary of the girl annoyed me a bit and I found the descriptions of her thinking a little strained and forced.

Fine to kill some time but the ratings mislead (in my personal view that is, clearly a lot of people did love it)
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best paranormal YA of 2011, 20 Feb. 2012
By 
O. Lisa "NightReader" (italy) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
My first thought: another book about angels? I have to confess, it's the supernatural category I somehow like less. I find the whole religious issue a bit tricky in most cases, and it takes a solid world-building and a systematic and logical approach to metaphysical dilemmas not to have my brain turned into a useless heap of mush (see the Hallowed: An Unearthly Novel case).

In Angelfall though, Susan Ee managed to do a masterful job in dealing with all these nuances and I loved this book to bits.

So first of all, angels here are not... angelic. They're the bad guys, real harbingers of doom. They have come to Earth and have destroyed society as we know it, causing natural disasters, decimating the population, spreading pestilence. The call humans "the monkeys" and if they don't kill them straight away, they enslave them.
The world has turned to anarchy, people hide, try to survive and gangs have formed, looting and killing whatever and whoever they find.

Penryn is on the run, like everybody else. Homeless, after squatting in an apt for a while, she's trying to take her family - her crazy mother and her paralytic sister - to a safer place, up the hills surrounding Silicon Valley. They're escaping during the night, hoping not to be seen. During the escape though, Penryn witnesses a gang of angels settling a score with another angel. She should run and think only about her family but one of them spots them and her sister gets taken away. Penryn's left with only one choice: help the "fallen" angel the gang was trying to kill and oblige him to tell her where they took the kid.

Post-apocalyptic literature cannot get much better than this in my opinion and this is certainly the best I've read this year. Ee's world-building is simply amazing and I loved, loved, loved the idea behind the story. If "even angels have their wicked schemes", these ones are really, really wicked ones. They're warriors, sent to Earth by, supposedly, God, who seems to talk only to The Messenger, a chosen one. But The Messenger has been killed at the beginning of the invasion without leaving directions and now they're clueless as to their purpose.
I really liked the idea of a non all-loving god. To be precise, nobody even knows IF He's there, there's just The Messenger's word. The religious theme here is clearly treated in a very laical way, with no preaching on either side, which I appreciated a lot. I found it really brilliant that one of those same angels is barely a believer. Basically, the message here has little to do with religion or deity: angels could be just another race, aliens, as debauched and vicious as humans are, while this just another story of oppression and racism of one people towards another.

Character-wise, on the one hand there's Penryn, a human girl, a Daughter of Men. A badass, in my head she's reminiscent of Katniss from The Hunger Games. She's a survivor, all intent on saving her mother and her little sick sister. I liked her. A lot. She's not perfect and will make you want to smack her with her pig-headedness at times, but she's a good girl who's doing her best to care for her loved ones in a dreadful situation. There's just one sentence in the whole book she should never have uttered according to me: "I just want to be an ordinary girl living an ordinary life" - ohhh, puhhhleasse, but aside from that, she is a likable character.
On the other hand Raffe, the oppressor, though apparently gone rogue. He's borderline good/jerk, and alas, that mix I really like (see Barrons from the Fever Series). There will be times you won't like this guy for things he does or says but end in end, you see there's some good in him, and he just needs to work out his angelic issues.
I really liked the process of these two having to collaborate, come to terms with each other and overcome their prejudices and suspicions toward the otherness.

While the first part of the book, with all their hiding and escaping was great, the second part when they get to San Francisco was stunning. Very dark, a bit gory, definitely sick in some parts, I was blown away. I'll just say that there will be some cannibal monsters, some scorpion-angels and metallic teeth involved.
Even the ending was extremely good and while it ends with a sort of cliffhanger that left me craving for the next book, it's bearable.
I will be the first in line waiting for the sequel...
... and maybe I forgot to mention this is a self-published book? So, so, sorry for many published authors, this book puts to shame so many of them.
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