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55 of 67 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Danger on the edge of town
Five pre-middle-aged male friends are drawn to Newton Haven, the site of their failed dozen-pub crawl as students in 1990. They're led by Gary King (Simon Pegg). He's the one who couldn't move on from that night; couldn't get a job like them, or get married like them. Reluctant revelry and bad-tempered banter ensues, before the gang discovers that the residents of the...
Published 9 months ago by R. J. Harvey

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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Looks good but not that funny
From send-ups of zombie and buddy cop films, Pegg and Frost now tackle the sci-fi genre, although this is not obvious at the outset. At the beginning Pegg's character Gary King is a depressed alcoholic with no future, trying to rekindle past glory by attempting a mammoth pub crawl that defeated his teenage self. On paper there's a great cast for his school friends...
Published 3 months ago by Frederick Barnstaple


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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Looks good but not that funny, 26 Dec 2013
This review is from: The World's End [DVD] (DVD)
From send-ups of zombie and buddy cop films, Pegg and Frost now tackle the sci-fi genre, although this is not obvious at the outset. At the beginning Pegg's character Gary King is a depressed alcoholic with no future, trying to rekindle past glory by attempting a mammoth pub crawl that defeated his teenage self. On paper there's a great cast for his school friends including Nick Frost, Paddy Considine, Martin Freeman and Eddie Marsan.

Central to the film is the character of King, who unlike previous Characters Shaun and Nicholas Angel is not that likeable. He has little ambition, he's self-centred, no one can argue with him and he has the same clapped out car; a boy trapped in a man's body. There is potential for conflict with his more successful friends who have families and jobs and this is explored until their night out becomes more of a challenge.

Similar to the sort of encounters in Shaun of the Dead, their foes are now face-grabbing robots whose limbs make a satisfying pop as they snap off and their heads sometimes shatter like porcelain, spraying a thick blue blood all over the place. From this point on the exploration of character is thrown out of the window and it's more about pub brawls, spilt pints and Frost's character proving he's actually good at fighting.

Unfortunately for a comedy, it isn't that funny. I laughed occasionally and smiled at some of the other jokes but it felt like it worked better as a slightly odd drama with actors you liked. In fact there were one or two quite poignant moments where Pegg's character elicited sympathy, where his behaviour is explained. These didn't help the comedy, but added a bit of depth to the story.

For fans of the previous two films there are some nice references, like them crashing over a low hedge and wooden fence. And like Hot Fuzz the world they enter is one where there is a larger picture, where someone else is trying to control them and they have to fight their way out.

Overall it is perhaps the weakest of the Cornetto Trilogy for being less funny. On the plus side the film is very well shot, with some of the director's trademark close-ups of action and fast cuts. It has a great soundtrack of music from their youth and the setup of the pub crawl that King is determined to finish works well to bind the story together. For fans of Pegg and Frost you should see it, but anyone else might be disappointed.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Bitter End..., 11 Mar 2014
By 
Mark Barry (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The World's End (Blu-ray)
I have to agree with many on this one. I laughed a few times at "The World's End" - but on more than one occasion about twenty minutes in - I actually reached for the fast forward button.

The problem is that the central joke about a pub crawl becomes stale very very fast indeed - and every scene that Simon Pegg is in as the wiseass in a beat-up car trying to relive a drinking bout with old friends becomes incredibly forced. And no amount of blue goo in toilets made this any more entertaining.

The central four might have had fun making this film - but I found it a chore watching it. Pierce Brosnan adds an undenable star power to proceedings (even when his eyes glow) and Rosamund Pike/Paddy Considine make for a convincing couple.

But in the end (if you'll forgive the terrible pun) - "The World's End" is a rental at best...and not a very enjoyable one at that...
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30 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ideas End, 26 Nov 2013
By 
Mike (Keighley, W.Yorks) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The World's End [DVD] (DVD)
Don't get me wrong, World's End isn't a bad film, it's brilliantly filmed, well acted and funny in places, it's just you get a sense of deja vu watching it.

I know a lot of Wright and Pegg's work has revolved around comedic homage to other popular culture references but they are ripping them selves off dreadfully here. The central premise is lifted straight from Sean of The Dead only with robots instead of zombies, the subtext is lifted straight from Hot Fuzz (strange underground movement trying to retain the niceness of an otherwise arse end of nowhere location using somewhat unpleasant means) and the unnecessarily gratuitous swearing is lifted straight out of Paul. Even Pegg's character is a less likeable version of Tim Bisley from Spaced. Possibly, after 15 years, it's just run it's course. Sean Of The Dead and Hot Fuzz set the bar incredibly high but transparently rehashing old ideas does smack of a creative block.

I'd hate to think that with Pegg getting increasingly bigger parts elsewhere, he's losing interest in his own work.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Sadly Disappointing, 24 Jan 2014
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I wanted to like this film. I wanted to love this film. Being the third instalment of the Cornetto trilogy (thus being the sequel to two films I greatly liked and admired) I sat down with all manner of expectation, excitement and goodwill. One hour, fifty minutes later I turned the blu-ray player off and felt... empty. I wasn't howling at the screen about poor production, or terrible casting, rotten acting or a dire script, but... but, The World's End didn't do it for me.

And, maybe, it was my prior experiences which had so coloured my expectations and made this film so difficult for me to like. But, then again, maybe not. I rather suspect that Peg and his cohorts want their audience to dislike a lot in the movie. Indeed, given the character Peg is playing, dislike is the mildest response I feel to be appropriate to the man. Yes, in Shaun of the Dead, we're presented with a man whose not been able to properly finish growing up and the film works on that thesis and plays it into the story beautifully. And, yes, in Hot Fuzz, Peg plays a character who's obsession with his work and near messianic need to be the best copper that Britain's ever seen, makes him, initially, someone to whom it's difficult to relate and sympathize. But, neither of them come anywhere close to the screaming, loutish, egotistical, man-child, git, with whom we're presented in this final instalment. There's literally nothing, not a single damn thing, which I could conceivably enjoy about Gary King. And that made it a harsh watch of a film.

I felt that the joke, the running gag, of presenting us with losers, weirdoes, under achievers, over achievers, whom, in the third reel, we're meant to come to like and admire has, in this instalment, been misjudged. Even the worst anti-hero there has to be some element of charisma, intellect, or stubborn will there from the start which we can see will, in the right circumstances flower.

Between the Gary King problem and the over the top ending, I was seriously underwhelmed by The World's End. For all the clever foreshadowing, intricate maze of referencing jokes, word play and sight gags, the film fell flat. I honestly can't recall the last time a movie left me feeling this despondent by the fact that it's failed. But for me, it has.

Perhaps later viewing will change my opinion. Maybe, I'll end up seeing some aspect to the movie which will move me, or make me laugh, have my jaw dropping at the obscene cleverness of a sly reference five minutes in which culminates in Chevovian brilliance in the last act. Maybe and I do hope that this is the case. But, until then, The World's End, is, for me a flop. An adequately written, reasonably acted, well paced and handsomely produced flopped. but still... not a movie I'd feel comfortable recommending to anyone. Instead, I suggest that you go and watch Hot Fuzz again, that film rocks.
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55 of 67 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Danger on the edge of town, 24 July 2013
By 
R. J. Harvey (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Five pre-middle-aged male friends are drawn to Newton Haven, the site of their failed dozen-pub crawl as students in 1990. They're led by Gary King (Simon Pegg). He's the one who couldn't move on from that night; couldn't get a job like them, or get married like them. Reluctant revelry and bad-tempered banter ensues, before the gang discovers that the residents of the town have changed. That is, they have BEEN changed...

The World's End is considerably better than the ostensibly similar This Is The End, a super-indulgent American comedy which mistook f-bombs for humour and name-dropping for satire. Edgar Wright's film is indulgent also, but at the service of audience enjoyment, as opposed to the enjoyment of the players. The script is surprisingly dense and intricate, many of its jokes arriving bittersweet. In an era when so many comedies are heavily (and lazily) improvised, it's refreshing to watch a tightly woven story unfold for once.

The action scenes are given equal attention, lovingly choreographed like some kind of slapstick dance. Chief pugilist is Andrew, our sort-of-hero, played by Nick Frost with remarkable agility. This instalment is far less bloodthirsty than its predecessors - more Scott Pilgrim than Shaun.

The rest of the group is made up of Paddy Considine, Eddie Marsan, and Martin Freeman. The performances are all top-drawer, although it takes time for their individual personalities to emerge. But then, the fact that they are now practically indistinguishable may be the point - for all their disapproval of Gary, they are the ones playing it safe.

What's most impressive about The World's End is the fact that it's actually about something. Nostalgia is easy to indulge but difficult to deconstruct, but this film genuinely aspires to explore the idea of selective memory - as with a bad hangover, our memories tends to return in subjective spasms, and the truth is only accessible by gathering multiple witnesses. And the truth isn't always what it cracked up to be.

The World's End is, for me, the best of the "Cornetto Trilogy". Highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good fun (but not classic Pegg/Frost), 20 Feb 2014
This review is from: The World's End [DVD] (DVD)
‘The World’s End’ marks the last (?) in the ‘blood and cornettos’ trilogy (aka Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz and now this), but it has been the least well-received of the three. Instead of horror or action, now the team behind the films parody science fiction. It’s about five forty-something men who decide to attempt a ‘legendary’ pub crawl which they failed at during their youth. However, this – unfortunately – coincides with a most sinister alien presence that’s started to take over their town.

The first thing I found was that it wasn’t as funny as the previous two. Therefore, I was in the process of NOT enjoying it that much, until about half way through when the ‘character-building’ part of the tale ended and the action really kicked off. About halfway through when the evil reveals itself, the film changes gear and moves away from (attempted?) humour to action and science fiction.

I kind of felt it worked a lot better as sci-fi rather than comedy. Plus, whereas we’re used to seeing the film’s star – Simon Pegg – as a usual bumbling but lovable character, here he breaks form and comes across as a bit of an insufferable berk. He’s actually pretty annoying for most of the first half, but luckily tones it down for the second leg.

Basically, if you’re hoping for something equally humorous as ‘Shaun’ and ‘Fuzz’ then you probably won’t find it here. However, if you’re a fan of action and sci-fi then the second half will probably save it for you and tick all your boxes.

It’s also worth noting that a lot of people disapproved of the ending. I certainly thought it was bold if nothing else!
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What the **** does WTF mean?, 17 Nov 2013
20 years after attempting an epic pub crawl, five friends reunite when one of them becomes obsessed with trying the drinking marathon again.

They are convinced by Gary, a 40-year old man trapped in the wilderness of his teens, who drags his reluctant pals to their home town and once again attempts to reach the fabled pub, The World's End.

As they attempt to reconcile the past and present, they realise the real struggle is for the future, not just theirs but humankind's.

Reaching The World's End is the least of their worries......

Seven years after the brilliant, but overlong Hot Fuzz, Wright, Pegg and Frost complete their fabled Cornetto trilogy with this, a hybrid of the first two movies. The 'Robots' are almost Zombie like, and the village pretty much resembles Sandford.

And while it doesn't hit the heights of SOTD (which nothing will for a long time), its on a par with Hot Fuzz, and its great to see the majority of the cast from both films back for very small roles, or extended cameos.

But I really feel that the film will be appreciated more by the thirty to forty something crowd, because the film oozes nostalgia from the early nineties and it really took me back to my schooldays and the music is amazing.

Pegg is different in this, he's the antagonist, the bad seed in the group, and although we never really know the reasons why (apart from the fact he misses his adolescence), his character oozes aggravation and sympathy at he same time.

Frost is as good as always, as is Considine. Freeman and Marsan get a little bit left out, but they still have some great scenes.

It takes a wile to get going, but once we hit the first pub, you will get the familiarity back from the first two movies, and Spaced.

Its not the masterpiece I was expecting, but I was laughing from begging. To end, and the host of cameos were just wonderful.

Brilliant in so many ways.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cornetto Or Death?, 15 Dec 2013
By 
Mr. M. A. Reed (Argleton, GB) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
The third, and final film, in the Cornetto Trilogy, "The World's End" yadda yadda Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg, Nick Frost, used to be In Shaun Of The Fuzz, you know the deal. Anyway, this, the long awaited climax of three distinctly loving parody-homages to genres end with this huge ensemble piece that is made of passion and silliness. At the heart of it, "The World's End" is the first film in a long time that approaches an issue that anyone around 40 knows : what happens as you start to age, as your world starts to change, as you have to grow up and stop being childish, without losing your sense of childlike wonder. In it, Pegg plays Gary King, a nervously recovering alcoholic in a shell of a life, planning a meticulous relapse / acceptance of his own world's end. At the cusp of 40, and still in the same Sisters Of Mercy t-shirt he was wearing at 18, he reforms 'the band' for one last night of glory. Some of us still do this, of course, but we only visit the past, we don't live there : we see old bands, old friends, but we know that this is the new world, and no longer the past. Never forget the past, just don't stay part of it forever.

As a midlife crisis, there is no more accurate film than the painful first half of "The World's End", where the dogged refusal to realise it's not the same becomes more, and more, obvious until a failure to accept the changing reality is not just obvious, but downright dangerous. At the midpoint the film offers it's grand reveal, and the unsubtle imagery is that somehow maturity, responsibility, is some kind of spiritual death : at some point the person we were was replaced by someone far more boring and dead inside. At what point does maturity become domestication, at what point does blending in become subservience? On the other hand, "The World's End" is more intelligent than that, and it's a complex, but fun film, about addiction - at what point does the addict become the core personality, at what point is Gary King really himself? Is Gary King really the hollow man in AA, a twelve-step plan, recovery and leisurewear, or is he really the stuck-in-time Goth from 1990? Him sticking to his outlandish self-appointed mission is thrice a) the last bastion of the addict, b) the living out of a final dream and c) really stupid. Because, as the Michael Bay had it, It Just Got Real.

On the other hand, this is the nearest Edgar Wright ever got to making an episode of Doctor Who ; from the smalltown England setting to the cheap-and-cheerful effects and distinctly insular threats that never stretch any further than the cold, small streets and the girl next door ; the greatest love interest in this film is, after all, your mate's sister. Of course, the dialogue and imagery is dense and multifacted, thought through to the umpteenth level and rewarding multiple repeat viewings. Even now, 10 years after the fact, I get new things out of "Shaun Of The Dead", and this is, even on a first watch, denser than neutron soup with innocent double-meanings and moments.

Perhaps, and this is spoiler territory, the ending is the greatest copout there is ; unlike "Terminator 3" which gave a bravely bleak finale, "The World's End" is more a self-defeatingly obvious finale, a final moment of rebellion to fulfill the illusion of choice, at whatever cost, an illusion that costs the world billions of lives. Make no mistake, Gary King is an argumentative drunk who wouldn't back down and ending up ruining most of mankind with stubborn stupidity and a denial of reality. Films are nothing but imagination anyway and this one is perhaps one of the more terrifying imaginations there is - no comfort, no resolution. But an end, and a beginning. It's a film that could only have been made there and then, at that point in life, at middle age, and perhaps then, the most mature work any of them have been involved in yet. So maybe a childhood's end, the end of a world of innocence. A rich and thoughtful film. One I will be coming back to.

And, by the way, about a thousand times better than Paul.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ok, 13 Nov 2013
By 
T. Jones (uk) - See all my reviews
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I really like Shaun of the dead and hot fuzz was quite good. This is not up to their standards but is still ok. The cast is strong and the idea is solid but it loses its oomph about half way through, then just gets dull.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Random moments of greatness, 22 Aug 2013
This review is from: The World's End [DVD] (DVD)
I went into this wanting to love it and really adored parts of it. There are moments where you feel the Cornetto magic sparkling from the screen and it's great to play spot-the-face as lots of familiar faces from Pegg and Frost past epics make an appearance.

There are parts of the film where it feels a bit forced, as if they were as keen to please as we were to be pleased, but it's easy to push these aside and enjoy the whole story.

This film can be watched without seeing the other Cornetto movies - as with all of them, it stands alone. But if you have seen the others, this is one you must include.

I've given this film a hearty 4 stars, simply because Shaun of the Dead is a pure 5 star movie and this one doesn't quite reach those heights. You'll still have a happy, ice-creamy feeling inside once you see it to the end though. Enjoy!
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The World's End [DVD]
The World's End [DVD] by Edgar Wright (DVD - 2013)
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