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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Start automating with Arduino shielded Raspberry Pi
As a newbie in the field of not only Raspberry Pi, but of electronics as a whole, I needed a lot of background to catch up with. All of these resistors, thermistors, bread-boards, shields, wire-color-codes, etc. - the book is not a theoretical guide in the filed but give just enough explanations for all the hardware involved. The book's chapters are typically organised as...
Published 12 months ago by Ivan Popov

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5 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not for Arduino Uno, Mega etc, but Arduio shield for Pi
I expected Projects covering the PI and Arduino Uno, Mega etc.
But from what I've seen, this book only covers Pi plus a Arduino shield, Gertboard or Pi plate.
There are other books describing Pi and "real" Arduino.
Published 11 months ago by eralera


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Start automating with Arduino shielded Raspberry Pi, 1 April 2013
By 
Ivan Popov (Plovdiv, Bulgaria) - See all my reviews
As a newbie in the field of not only Raspberry Pi, but of electronics as a whole, I needed a lot of background to catch up with. All of these resistors, thermistors, bread-boards, shields, wire-color-codes, etc. - the book is not a theoretical guide in the filed but give just enough explanations for all the hardware involved. The book's chapters are typically organised as a set of tutorials. This makes it comfortably structured, and allows for quicker reading and jumping directly to your level or particular sub-theme of interest.

So lets be a bit more specific and see what is in the book. The first chapter is introductory in sense of providing historical background to the both platforms - Raspberry Pi and Arduino, and automation of the home environment. In the end we are convinced that the Pi (equipped with the Arduino shield) really represents a little revolution in the field.

The next two chapters provide the initial set-up for our automating system. From installing the operating system of choice, through constructing the shielded device, to the programming tools required for managing the test system. Here the chosen OS is the "default" option for Raspberry Pi - Raspbian Wheezy. Once the shield is installed, the programmatic communication with it needs to be carried through some library. It is shown, how to check which version of the provided arduPi library is the right one for our Pi. When ready and after the mandatory Blinking LED test we're set and ready to dive.

Chapter four is very important, because it is a proof of concept. Guiding us through making the hardware set-up of digital thermometer and finally the code that reads the measurements, it is actually the first example of a real world application of the Pi. Just reading through this chapter and automation ideas might start to pop out. And since the home is a physical environment, the underlying laws and principles are explained when necessary up to the mathematical equation and its corresponding arduPi code. We're hinted that for further and more complex experimentation the simple Geany IDE could be of great help to automate the process of compiling and running the executable binaries.

The next chapter five is the fore mentioned increasing (although quite slight) of complexity - it shows how to turn the thermometer into a thermostat. On the level of hardware the relays are introduced. On the level of software the screen and the cURL were installed in order to keep the application as an autonomously running process on Raspbian, and for the application to communicate to other programs (code) through URLs respectively.

Chapter six is dedicated to making things permanent - to better control the data by recording the measurements to a database. The mixture of SQLite, HTSQL, Apache HTTP server with WSGI (server side Python implementation) is gradually tied up so in the end all the results are written into the SQLite database file. Its data can conveniently be displayed in the simple web application just created.

The seventh chapter takes a little step aside, by exploring the task of using the combination of photoresistor and a motor shield, which is a bit different look of the previous task. They're used to automatically close/open blinds regarding the environment's luminosity. Thus it is shown that there is abundance of ideas floating around and only the lack of imagination can make them remain invisible. Discovering the new projects is subjective to everyone and hinting to some of them is the task of the last chapter eight. Here the tone is set for the real world problems. The hardware presented is the Gertboard, the GPIO pins and their meanings, the components from the previous tasks are provided with some more advanced details. Some possible applications are mentioned (like the modern 3D printing for instance).

So if you're this type of electronics enthusiast who is new to Raspberry Pi, this book is for you, regardless of your experience with soldering components. The book has a real practical value. But only if you're not afraid to get your hands a little bit dirty.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, 18 Mar 2014
By 
P. Brown "smstext" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Raspberry Pi Home Automation with Arduino (Kindle Edition)
Although I feel this is more arduino related than pi, it certainly filled me with ideas for future projects with the pi
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good First Impressions, 28 May 2013
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I had a Raspberry Pi but hardly had it out of the box - this book has meant that I have decided to give it another chance.
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7 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "A little book that could ", 18 Feb 2013
Hello gentle readers ... "This is scribendor 'quilling'"
As someone who runs a technical training company and a small technical bookshop it should come as no surprise that I would be interested in just this kind of book ... Raspberry Pi Home Automation with Arduino
Actually I came across it via a discussion thread in LinkedIn ... thanks due to Kevin ..
So, following Kevin's example I expressed an interest and obtained a review copy.
Actually I quite a fan of Packt publishing ... Many's the time that some of their books have provided timely material that has helped me in developing one esoteric course or other. The most recent one being an nginx course ... ran recently for a large internet retailer in the US.

I really like the book ... and posted reviews on LinkedIn (RaspberryPi workshops group) and Facebook.
Without any more ado here is the review (political sermon and all).

A review of a nice little book dealing with "would you believe it" - Home Automation !!!

RaspberryPi - Home automation ...
[...]
It is still "early days" for the RaspberryPi .. "the little Linux board that could"
As with many successful "open source'ish" initiatives the RasPi has thrived on the basis of an active network of enthusiasts ably "nudged" by Liz Eben ... the partner and supporter of the "inventor of the RasPi.

Home automation is one of those topics that attracts both professionals, "big electronica", as well as amateurs. This book is firmly aimed at amateurs.
If you were to do home automation really professionally then you would probably implement something like BACNET or KNX ... not so easy !!

Hobbyists want projects that are relatively easy to build, to program and to understand.
This book "fits the bill".

Of particular interest is that it makes extensive use of the Arduino Bridge Shield developed by "Cooking Hacks" a Spanish company, Libelium, that sells a variety of AdHoc sensor networking systems and hubs (Waspmote) as well as Arduino add ons. Its good to see that there are Spanish
companies doing good things in the "electronics sector" , despite the terrible damage done to the Spanish economy by those "evil bankers and ... their politician and big business lackeys" [ Here endeth this particular sermon ... ], and who, in general have very little understanding of the needs and problems faced by small high tech enterprises, to quote from my ( fairly useless ) small business manager "I don't really understand what your company is doing ... " when I was trying to explain some of the advanced embedded and real time courses we were developing and running.

Particularly interesting for some will be the inclusion of the arduPi library by Cooking Hacks, which makes it possible to write Arduino applications and use them on the Raspberry Pi without needing a separate microcontroller such as an Uno board. I wish I had "thought of that".

The book starts of with typical Arduino like projects such as flashing an LED and obtaining temperature readings ... designed to provide background knowledg and to build up confidence.
It then goes on to cover some basic (from the point of view of home automation) projects, starting off with the construction of a thermostat controller which can save readings to an Sqlite database. These readings can then be retrieved via a web browser courtesy of HTSQL (HypertextStructure Query Language). HTSQL is something that is worth knowing about.

Having mastered the basics it is time to go on to another fairly standard home automation application, namely "curtain automation" - that can open and close the curtains based on the ambient light level value.

As they say in the cartoons "That's all folks".
Well not quite, because there is a wrapup chapter with useful follow on suggestions.

I liked this book. "Genius level" hackers and engineers may "frown upon it" ... but it is not meant for such people, even though I think that there are things in there that they may not necessarily know about already.

For STEM teachers, college teachers and for use on introductory embedded systems courses it is a treasure trove of examples and resources. It will also, I feel help overcome the feeling by many owners of RaspberryPi's expressed in words such as "well, now I've got it what can I do with it".

When I have time I will port my Microchip multitasking programming notes (that implement a garden sprinkler controlled by a PIC16/PIC18 .. and even a PIC24 or a PIC32 if you want to get ambitious and add ethernet and a touch screen) to the Raspberry Pi.

For the more technically minded ... send me an email and we can start discussing more "exotic" home automation systems that support BACNET and/or KNX.

.. and, fame at last ... there was an appreciative comment on the review posted in LinkedIn (in the RaspberryPi workshops group) ...
"I like the review, very amusing indeed. You could not be more right in saying "well, now I've got it what can I do with it", I know a lot of people with that exact problem, perhaps I can point them in the direction of this book now" ... thank you Peter.

And, finally , a plug for a little book I am funding via Kickstarter - USB Microchip Programming - go take a look if you feel inclined to do so.
[...].Donations would be especially welcome, however, technical suggestions and interesting case studies and code snippets would also be very much appreciated.

Thank you kind readers
Scribendor.
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5 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not for Arduino Uno, Mega etc, but Arduio shield for Pi, 5 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I expected Projects covering the PI and Arduino Uno, Mega etc.
But from what I've seen, this book only covers Pi plus a Arduino shield, Gertboard or Pi plate.
There are other books describing Pi and "real" Arduino.
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