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67 of 70 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars great little point and shoot camera
I haven't had much exposure to these point and shoot cameras recently (tending more to DSLR and bridge cameras), and I had wondered as more and more people have cameras on their phones whether there was much of a market for these compact cameras. On the evidence of a few days playing around with this I can see that there is. The camera software has come on leaps and...
Published 16 months ago by Don Panik

versus
73 of 78 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing
I've been a Canon fan half my life. From excellent point-and-shoot 35mm compacts through EOS SLR to my current EOS dSLR. And always very satisfied with the quality for the price.

I don't take my dSLR everywhere, and I like a camera in my pocket. So I thought it was time for something really portable, and I examined a range of cameras, finally going for the...
Published 15 months ago by Pickwick


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67 of 70 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars great little point and shoot camera, 20 Aug 2013
By 
Don Panik (Cambridge UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I haven't had much exposure to these point and shoot cameras recently (tending more to DSLR and bridge cameras), and I had wondered as more and more people have cameras on their phones whether there was much of a market for these compact cameras. On the evidence of a few days playing around with this I can see that there is. The camera software has come on leaps and bounds (32 different scenes that can be applied), and the 16mb gives high quality pictures in a range of settings. This makes it very worthwhile to carry a dedicated camera - particularly when it is as compact, and good looking as this sleek metal bodied example.

Whilst it is possible to get into P mode it is a bit fiddly and I suspect most people will use this on fully automatic mode. Getting 8x magnification in such a small package is excellent and there is the option to go higher than that via digital. The video record function is 720 HD with basic but ok mono sound recording. The inclusion of a macro feature is an unexpected bonus. Using the camera itself in auto mode is about as simple as could be. Apart from having to turn up the brightness on the screen in bright sunlight (there is no viewfinder), I can see many people never venturing into the menu. The instructions that come with it are fairly minimal and you have to go online to download the full manual. However it is very intuitive and I was able to find my way around without consulting the start guide. It helps that there is an option to have tips / explanations display option. I was slightly surprised that no usb lead was included. I take the point that most people will already have one that will fit, and many like me will prefer to take the SD card out to transfer pictures, but for the sake of a few pence this will dent the consumer experience for some people.

So in use this is very easy. The quality of photos seems pretty good in a range of situations, and the latest software that snaps when it sees you smile is great. About the only thing I don't like is that being small and shiny metal, getting a good grip can be a little difficult. The included battery seems up to the job, but you would need to take the smallish charger with you if you intend to take more than a couple of hundred photos. Overall then, an excellent little point and shoot camera, at a good price. I like it.
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73 of 78 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 13 Sep 2013
I've been a Canon fan half my life. From excellent point-and-shoot 35mm compacts through EOS SLR to my current EOS dSLR. And always very satisfied with the quality for the price.

I don't take my dSLR everywhere, and I like a camera in my pocket. So I thought it was time for something really portable, and I examined a range of cameras, finally going for the Ixus 132 - right size, right features and a price I could afford. Plus the Canon name, which I've always believed I could rely on.

But I find I'm not knocked out by the quality of this camera - or to be more exact not by the quality of the images.

This camera may boast 16mp, but the quality of imagery just isn't there. I have a 9-year old (but much larger) Canon Powershot which even at 7mp takes markedly better pictures. The Ixus zoom is impressive for such a small camera, and I love the large lcd screen - but what's the point if the image (even on manual with ISO ramped down) is noisy and low on acutance? Prints from the whole frame are fair enough - but they're usually fine on any camera over 4mp. Any attempt at cropping the picture, or printing only part of a frame soon shows the camera's limitations.

Like others here, I find the excuse for a 'user manual' to be a complete joke.

Sorry - but apart from the annoyance of a thoroughly disappointing camera, this now means I won't in future be automatically associating the name Canon with quality in the way I've done in the past.
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41 of 46 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Small enough to have with you all the time, 20 Aug 2013
By 
Peter (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This is a very small camera indeed. It's small enough to slip into a jacket pocket and hardly notice its there. If you're happy with automatic or straightforward program settings then it offers reasonable optics (very good for the size, but it has a rather small objective lens) and a proper 8X optical zoom onto a 16M pixel sensor, neither of which you'll get from a smartphone. So this camera's niche is for people who want better pictures than you can get from a smartphone but don't want to have to lug a great big SLR around with them. And it really is small enough that you can take it everywhere.

The camera comes with its own rechargeable battery and an external battery charger. You can't charge the battery in the camera, which is one way to make the camera smaller, but it does mean you have a charger somewhere in the house. Incidentally, when you place the battery in the charger for the first time, make sure you get it the right way up: I put mine in upside-down, and it took ages to get it out again.

You also need to buy an SD/SDHC/SDXC memory card, because otherwise you have nowhere to store your photos and videos. Something like this works fine (it's the card I'm using, and it will hold 1133 superfine large images or 49 minutes of video, which should be fine for most purposes). There's only very basic printed instructions (7 pages in English, repeated in a variety of other languages) and no mini-USB cable. If you want to transfer images to a computer, it's probably best to take out the memory card and plug it straight into the computer if you can; otherwise you'll need a cable like this one (you may already have one somewhere in your house).

Other than the battery charger, the only supplied accessory is a wrist strap, which is right-handed only. The button layout is pretty standard for small cameras, with the on/off button and the shutter and zoom controls on top and the various menu settings on the back. The viewing screen is decent, but there's no optical viewfinder - hadly a surprise on a camera this size. When you first turn the camera on it asks for the date and time (it encodes a timestamp into the EXIF data in each photograph, invisibly). It then asks you to press "Set" to continue, by which it means the button labelled "Func. Set" in the middle of the selector wheel. It took me a couple of minutes to work this out. Anyway.

You can record video. Disappointingly, it's at 1280 x 720 framesize, not "Full HD", but the quality is good. You can choose the ratio of your still photos in the "Func. Set" menu. 4:3 (16M pixel 4608 x 3456) is native. If you choose 3:2, 16:9 or square (1:1) it crops the image in camera, and you lose pixels in your image. If you're happy with editing your images on your computer its probably best to stick with 4:3 and crop the pictures later.

One of the controls on the back is a slider that lets you flip between Auto and Program modes. Auto makes all your decisions for you; with Program you can adjust various settings. When you're in Program mode you can set image compression to "Superfine", which means you get smoother images with fewer JPEG artefacts, but your memory card can't store as many pictures. I always use the Superfine mode, and I find it disappointing that it's not available in Auto mode.

Autofocus is good, but takes a while to work. When I tried taking zoomed-in pictures of close-up subjects it wasn't always obvious whether the autofocus had worked. Sometimes it hadn't, and I got a badly blurred picture. There is a macro setting, and another to force the camera to infinity, which is useful if you don't want the camera mistakenly focusing on something in the foreground. After spending a few minutes practicing I found I was able to take some quite reasonable pictures, much better than I can get from my smartphone, and not noticeably worse than I get from a much bulkier Canon camera. Having the 16M pixel sensor makes a big difference to image quality.

So it's a very small camera. It's slim, light and it looks pretty stylish too. I have a better camera, but it's too big to carry with me all the time, and that's where this one comes in: it's there when I need it.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love, love love it - so much better than my iPhone camera, 8 Dec 2013
By 
I love my iPhone 4S and it has a good camera in daylight conditions. This Canon Ixus is amazing though and is such a good investment if you want:
a) a flash that properly illuminates a scene when you're taking photos indoors in shadow or outdoors at night
b) a powerful optical zoom that lets you close in on the action without any pixellation. the problem with digital zooms on phone cameras is that you essentially lose quality of photo if you zoom in too much
c) a camera that takes photos quickly without any delay

The Ixus is also slim and light so it doesn't feel like too much bulk. I slip it into my bag and carry it around very happily. I couldn't believe the price I got this camera either!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Practical and capable little point-and-shoot but a little under the quality of past IXUS models, 22 Sep 2013
By 
bomble "bomble" (Cambridge, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
My first digital camera was an IXUS 700 in 2005 and, costly as it was, it's still going strong on its original battery. In 2011, shopping for a family gift, I bought the IXUS 115 and again was most impressed (at a more affordable price tag by that point). So I expected much the same general feeling with the 132. In some ways, the 132 is a natural technological progression from its predecessors... but in others it's a bit less impressive and my overall impression is that it only just scrapes the boundary of what Canon should be calling a member of the IXUS range.

First off, if you knew nothing of photography and were just examining build quality, you'd think that the 8 year old IXUS 700 was by far the best made. It had a really well finished casing, extremely precise lens movement and, funnily enough, bore the words `Made in Japan' on the bottom. In the days before decent camera phones, this is the kind of thing you carried around for good opportunity shots. The 115 was a bit more mainstream in price and a little less stunning in build quality but boasted a full HD video mode which I can attest to being very competent. And then comes in the 132 which has some `top level' numbers that would seem to imply a steady progression (more pixels - as if we needed them! - bigger optical zoom at x8) but then lined up against the older 115 things get murky. Moreover, the 132 just feels a less high-quality item; made in China (though that in itself is no reflection on quality) but just more plasticcy with a snap-close body (no tidy little grub screws) and a general lack of finesse.

Then when you look at the spec you see that the 115 boasted a CMOS sensor, bigger LCD, full HD movie quality, slightly longer battery life, a wider aperture and longer exposure times and the same basic processor. In other words, a more up-market machine.

I don't pretend to know how Canon place their cameras in their range but to the uninitiated, I'd expect a newer IXUS to be better than an older one. Not so on spec in this example.

But what about in use? Well here I am more impressed. This is a really easy camera to get to know, especially if you've played with Canons before. In fact, so intuitive was it that I lent it to my five yearold daughter to use on a recent trip to Duxford Air Museum and Little Gransden Airshow. She got the best shots of the spectacular aerobatics at the show out of the whole family. The zoom came into its own and the smart focussing just took care of all the tricky stuff while my daughter delighted in showing me the results. Of course a camera like this doesn't cope so well with indoor shots but it managed better than any smart phone and the video quality isn't bad at all despite the slightly lower resolution.

In summary, the 132 is a very portable, competent and intuitive camera that I shall be packing with me as a matter of course for those unplanned photo-ops but I feel slightly sad that the IXUS range just isn't what it use to be and if you can do without the higher zoom power, I'd recommend the IXUS 115 over this particular model.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poor quality for a Canon Ixus - bitterly disappointed!, 25 Feb 2014
By 
C. Link "Clink" (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Canon IXUS 132 Digital Camera - Blue (16MP, 28mm Wide Angle, Eco Mode, 8x Optical Zoom) 3.2 inch LCD (discontinued by manufacturer) (Electronics)
I've had a Canon Ixus for many many years, it's gone in my handbag from party to party, event to event and always been a superior camera. Due to its age I thought I'd upgrade to a nice shiny new one - BIG MISTAKE. This is a VERY basic camera. If you are looking for a starter camera, maybe but I'd stick to your iPhone camera. Disappointment to the Ixus range.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Camera, 12 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I found this camera the answer to my needs which are small as an old lady of nearly 80 years.
It is small the bright colour means
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth for Money spent, 7 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Though the features of the camera are less compared to standard cameras, but the money spent worth the product.
Really felt good in using and the features are so simple that even a newebie can start playing with the camera.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Canon camera for family snappers, 20 Aug 2013
By 
Bernardette Lugner (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This is a camera for the casual snapper, holiday photographer, or anyone that just wants to take pictures easily and without fuss or complicated settings. That's me, but if you are a serious photography hobbyist or want photos for professional purposes, I think you'll need something better and pricier.

Like all Ixus cameras, the camera's body is metal and slippery, so the wrist strap is a must. I needed tweezers to thread it on to the camera. You will have to spend a few pounds on a memory card, and I recommend a small case, for a few pounds more.

The idea is that you set the camera to Auto, then it is literally point, zoom, shoot. The camera adjusts to a variety of light levels, picture types, and shooting conditions. It will focus right down to about 1 cm, so is great for tiny subjects. It is a bit flash-happy, and I preferred to leave the flash switched off most of the time. Movies are really easy. No special setting, you just press the movie record button to start, and press it again at the end of the shot. To view your pictures, press the playback button, and press it again when finished.

Picture quality was very pleasing, with sharp focus, effective anti-shake against small hand movements, and good colours. If you are concerned about artifacts at high ISO settings, fringing, RAW formats, vignetting at widest angle or any of that stuff, this is the wrong camera for you. As with most compacts, there is no optical viewfinder, so you are reliant on the screen to frame your shots.

If you switch off Auto mode, there are scene settings for softened portraits, low-light shots, snow, and fireworks, and you can change focussing rules, white balance, and brightness metering . . . if you really want to.

You get a very minimal "get started" guide, so for complete instructions, you must download the 150-page User Guide from the Canon website and save it on your computer. A lot of the guide covers functions which you are most unlikely to use, like emphasising chosen colours, applying special effects and some editing functions. All can be done much more easily after you have transferred pictures to your computer. Any simple editing program, such as Picasa or iPhoto or Photoshop Elements, can do these and much more. A big chunk of the manual covers wi-fi functions, which this model does not have. The Ixus 135 and 140 do. The useful section on camera setup preferences is near the end (Chapter 7).

If you want Canon software, you have to download that, too, but you do not need it. To get shots into your computer, take the memory card out of the camera, slot it into your computer and let your editing program import the new pictures. If your computer has no SD-card slot, you can buy a low-cost USB adapter to provide one. A connection cable is not necessary.

Whether this camera is for you depends mostly on how you want to take pictures. If you mean to keep it simple, then the Ixus 132 seemed to me to be good value for money, and did a good job.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent value - a great little camera, 6 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Bought this as a Christmas gift for my partner - he always envied my IXUS. He's delighted with it, though it'll take him a while ot get to grips with all the features!
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