Learn more Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 31 December 2013
I found the book a good way to refresh the basics about leadership. While sometimes it seems like stating the obvious, it's quite good to reinforce the points. Finally, I like the candid approach to politics and the role of networks and people in organizations.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
This is a revised and updated edition of a book I read when it was published in 2003. Although much has (and hasn't) happened in the business world since then, Michael Watkins' insights are (if anything) even more relevant and more valuable now than they were then because the actions taken by those in a new role, especially one with more challenging leadership responsibilities, will largely determine whether they succeed or fail. "When leaders derail," Watkins notes, "their problems can almost always be traced to vicious cycles that developed in the first few months on the job." Ninety percent of those whom Watkins interviewed agreed that "transitions into new roles are the most challenging times in the professional lives of leaders." They could be internal promotions, reassignments and/or relocations, or a new hire. These and other transitions are thoroughly discussed in the book.

These are among the dozens of passages that caught my eye, also listed to suggest the scope of Watkins' coverage.

o Avoiding Transition Traps (Pages 5-6)
o Understanding the Fundamental Principles (9-12)
o Getting promoted (21-24)
o Table 1-1, "Onboarding checklists" (34)
o Identifying the Best Sources of Insight (54-57)
o Table 2-1, "Structured methods for learning" (61-62)
o "Emotional Expensiveness" (63-64)
o Planning for Five [Transition-Specific] Conversations (90-93)
o Planning the Expectations Conversation (98-100)
o Adopting Basic Principles (121-122)
o Avoiding Common Alignment Traps (141-143)
o Getting Started (146-148)
o Avoiding Common Team-Building Traps (167-170)
o Building Support for Early-Win Objectives (202-220)
o Understanding the Three Pillars of Self-Management (227-237)
o Table 10-1, "Reasons for transition failures" (245)

The information, insights, and counsel he provides in this book reveal what he has learned thus far about what he characterizes as "The Vicious Cycle of Transition" and "The Virtuous Cycle of Transitions." The former involves sticking with what you know, falling prey to the "action imperative," setting unrealistic expectations, attempting to do too much, coming in with "the" answer, engaging in the wrong kind of learning, and neglecting horizontal relationships. (Please check out Figure 1-2 on Page 7.)

With regard to the latter cycle, the "virtuous" one, can enable anyone involved in a transition to create momentum and establish an upward spiral of increasing effectiveness. (Please check out Figure 1-3 on Page 8.) To repeat, this updated and expanded edition develops in greater depth and wider scope the core concepts introduced in the first edition. The objective in 2003 remains the same now: "get up to speed faster and smarter."

Michael Watkins can help each reader to do that; better yet, he can each reader, especially those with supervisory responsibilities, to help others to do that. That achievement is indeed an admirable objective. However, we are well-advised to recall Thomas Edison's observation, "Vision without execution is hallucination."
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 13 March 2014
Very comprehensive and detailed. Good templates and examples that can be used. Excellent reading for people who are promoted or moving to a new company.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 29 July 2013
I'm really enjoying this book. It is making me think of many things. The trouble I have with this is that I simply don't have the time to put everything into practice... they say awareness is the first step so here is hoping...
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 16 September 2014
Easy to read, logical approach to leadership for new leaders. The book takes the mystery out of success or failure - I was interested in the subject in relation to school leadership and although the book is written for a business audience, most of it is transferable to any context. I especially appreciated being introduced to the STARS portfolio. Useful when job searching to identify a situation that might fit well as well as after appointment since there are STARS within organizations too. There is much to learn in a new role and reading this early could save quite a bit of time and unnecessary stress. I am very happy I made this purchase.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 19 December 2014
If you're moving up the career ladder - either through internal promotion or by joining another company - then this book will serve as a useful guide as to how to make a good impact in those first few months.

Reassuringly there was much in the book that I'd already considered doing during the first days in my new role. There was also much that I hadn't considered and will be putting into practice.

In short, this book provides the tactics and strategy you need to make a good impression in your new job and to keep your focus on those things that are most important. It's a good read and well worth the investment.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 22 May 2014
I personally found the original book invaluable in my own professional career. By using the suggested strategies it made my transition into a more senior role easier, understand key relationships and helped me prepare for the many new challenges I faced.
Now in my role as an executive coach and freelance consultant I have either given or recommended this updated new version to my clients as part of their leadership toolkit when changing roles. The strategies are easily explained as is the context for their application.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 31 August 2015
There is lots of very useful information in this book, although not all was relevant to me at my level of leadership, I am 100% certain I will be revisiting those chapters later in my Career.

I work in the Further Education sector and found it very adaptable. I have started my new role as I mean to go on.

I highly recommend this book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 16 September 2014
Great book - mostly common sense stuff, but helpful in identifying the key issues to consider. Unsurprisingly very 'American' in its terminology and language, but none the worse for it. Tries to cater for all types of transition so there are some sections I found to be less relevant to my own situation. Readable as a one off or as a reference book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 9 November 2014
A starting position is to make sure you have an outline for your first few weeks. This helps focus the mind. However, it is not for middle or senior management. It is for executives that will be making company related or team structure related decisions.

So keep looking if you are a senior manager or lower.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse