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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a great 60s classic
Theorem is an amazing visual experience, and seeing it on the big screen - or on a high quality screen at home, no doubt - brings out just how avant-garde it still seems. The main thing about it for me is its extraordinary tone, both serious and comical, often at the same time. It is highly original in this respect, constantly surprising the viewer with its breathtaking...
Published on 22 Mar 2012 by schumann_bg

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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Theorem - and an interesting interview with Mr Stamp
I got this DVD out of curiosity - not realising that Terence Stamp had done a film with Pasolini. Theorem is somewhat similar to Pasolini's other ad lib social comment stuff from the 60s. Not at all like Gospel of St Matthew, the Decameron or Medea where the subject matter is historical.
For me the gem of this DVD was the bonus 30 minute interview with Terence Stamp...
Published on 21 Dec 2011 by D. Warner


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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Marxist-Machiavellian, 26 Sep 2012
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This review is from: Theorem [1968] [DVD] (DVD)
Teorema (Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1968, 105')

Written by Pier Paolo Pasolini, starring Laura Betti (Volpi Cup for Best Actress), Silvana Mangano, Massimo Girotti, Terence Stamp, Anne Wiazemsky, Ninetto Davoli. Music by Ennio Morricone, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and others, cinematography by Giuseppe Ruzzolini, editing by Nino Baragli.

Terence Stamp of Toby Dammit fame plays a mysterious figure who appears in the lives of a typical bourgeois Italian family. He engages in sexual affairs with all members of the household: the devoutly religious maid, the sensitive son, the sexually repressed mother, the timid daughter and, finally, the tormented father. The stranger gives unstintingly of himself, asking nothing in return. Then one day he leaves, as suddenly and mysteriously as he came.

The subsequent void created forces each family member to confront what was previously concealed by the trappings of bourgeois life. The mother seeks sexual encounters with young men, the son leaves the family home to become an artist, the daughter sinks into a catatonic state and the father strips himself of all material effects, handing his factory over to its workers, removing his clothes at a railway station and wandering naked into the wilderness. The maid returns to the rural village where she was born and is seen to perform miracles. (Wikipedia)

Reactions and interpretations range(d) widely - see the Wikipedia article. More discussion with more Pasolini films - this is only No2, after brilliant Mama Roma. I personally am happy with the following:

A cogent interpretation of this film is basically Machiavellian-Marxian. Pasolini, a longtime Communist, seems to make a critique of both the Italian haute bourgeoisie (the decadent family) and the southern proletariat (the maid). He urges for the appearance of a great man on the scene, a figure modeled after the Machiavellian idea of the 'prince,' to shake things up and straighten the path of Italy.

The young, virile man that played by Terence Stamp symbolizes the Machiavellian leader of great 'virtu' who exposes the truth and liberates each of the other characters so they can reach their full potential. In the end, the father, who owns the factory, departs into a desert in a Christian-like search for himself, but simultaneously liberates the factory workers, who thereby become masters of their own destiny.

The spectre of communism?

177 - Teorema (Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1968, 105') -Marxist-Machiavellian - 26/9/2012
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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Theorem, 23 Feb 2010
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J. C. Russell (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Theorem [1968] [DVD] (DVD)
I remember seeing this in the cinema soon after its release, where is caused a shock through the audience - not surprising as it was in Wales in the 1960's.
Terence Stamp was cashing in on his debut as Billy Budd, but out to be remembered for being more that a pretty blonde sailor boy in Herman Melville's story adapted for the screen.
In Theorem there is little dialogue and very strange mise en scenes but it is a memorable movie.
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4 of 21 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A non film, 27 Jan 2012
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This review is from: Theorem [1968] [DVD] (DVD)
The is one of the slowest moving films I have ever seen. It's right up there with watching paint dry. Other reviews seem to have great insight into its meaning. I just found it boring. A much more interesting film is "Something for Everyone" staring Michael York who seduces the whole household, but at least there is some action and passion.
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Theorem (DVD + Blu-ray)
Theorem (DVD + Blu-ray) by Pier Paolo Pasolini (Blu-ray - 2013)
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