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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good artwork quite good story i suppose, 6 Mar 2012
this book has very good artwork, the figures are well drawn and the colouring is very good. the only criticism i have is that these men would not be able to concentrate on fighting battles when the women are running around practically naked, so there might as well have been some sex scenes in it too to make it more realistic lol. The story is quite interesting and not all of the characters are one dimensional eg dor valian.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No sex please, we're Martians, 18 Nov 2011
By 
No More Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This is a collection of the five issues of Dynamite Entertainment's comic book `Warlord of Mars - Dejah Thoris Volume 1: Colossus of Mars'. It is a prequel to the graphic novel collection `Warlord of Mars'.
The art and scripting is of as reasonable standard for the story, which is basically wholesale slaughter of Martians by Martians in the tradition of Edgar Rice Burroughs' original stories. We have red Martians slaughtering red Martians, green Martians slaughtering red Martians, and Red/Green colossi slaughtering both red and Green Martians. We also have fathers killing sons (possibly accidentally) and sons shooting their fathers in the head for the last seat on the escape ship. They were both villains however. There are also many large female bosoms almost, but not quite, totally exposed to the reading public, whereas the men always keep their shorts on, even when hung up in the dungeons or being thrown to ravenous calots to be eaten alive. I wonder if the almost psychopathic slaughter of the Martians by each other is tied to sexual repression - one of the Martian leaders comments that "we have mandated strict procreation quotas in Zodanga", and another one observes that as the green Martians are breeding like rabbits, it is justifiable to exterminate them - though whether it is the Martians repression or the 19th century writer who created them, is open for discussion. It could just be the American comics' publishers' fear of prosecution for publishing comics with objectionable content, of which there have been many cases over the years - wholesale massacre is apparently not considered objectionable though. Anyway, it is all good clean fun, in the great American pulp tradition. I just find the artwork a bit too `cartoony', rather than being in the traditional American adventure comics' more naturalistic style.

The story itself is set just over 400 years before John Carter arrives on Mars. It begins during one of the apparently perennial wars between the twin cities of Helium. The battle is interrupted just as Dejah Thoris's family are about to finally defeat their enemies.

As an aside, the SPI boardgame company many years ago produced a boardgame based on Burroughs' `John Carter of Mars' stories. There was an `Unspeakable Acts' table. On which the female characters would roll a dice if captured by a villain, which would determined if she would commit suicide to avoid the unwanted attentions of her captor, or (if memory serves me) would use the dagger concealed about her person on the villain. The designer took the idea from the fact that Burroughs himself used the term `unspeakable acts' in these situations in his stories. I apologise for this aside, but seeing all the female flesh on display in the comic brought back the memory of the game.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No sex please, we're Martians, 4 May 2014
By 
No More Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
The story from the five issues of Dynamite Entertainment's comic book `Warlord of Mars - Dejah Thoris Volume 1: Colossus of Mars' is collected as Warlord of Mars: Dejah Thoris Volume 1 - The Colossus of Mars TP. It is a prequel to the graphic novel collection Warlord of Mars TP.

The art and scripting is of as reasonable standard for the story, which is basically wholesale slaughter of Martians by Martians in the tradition of Edgar Rice Burroughs' original stories. We have red Martians slaughtering red Martians, green Martians slaughtering red Martians, and Red/Green colossi slaughtering both red and Green Martians. We also have fathers killing sons (possibly accidentally) and sons shooting their fathers in the head for the last seat on the escape ship. They were both villains however. There are also many large female bosoms almost, but not quite, totally exposed to the reading public, whereas the men always keep their shorts on, even when hung up in the dungeons or being thrown to ravenous calots to be eaten alive. I wonder if the almost psychopathic slaughter of the Martians by each other is tied to sexual repression - one of the Martian leaders comments that "we have mandated strict procreation quotas in Zodanga", and another one observes that as the green Martians are breeding like rabbits, it is justifiable to exterminate them - though whether it is the Martians repression or the 19th century writer who created them, is open for discussion. It could just be the American comics' publishers' fear of prosecution for publishing comics with objectionable content, of which there have been many cases over the years - wholesale massacre is apparently not considered objectionable though. Anyway, it is all good clean fun, in the great American pulp tradition. I just find the artwork a bit too `cartoony', rather than being in the traditional American adventure comics' more naturalistic style - see the John Carter of Mars: Weird Worlds collection for an example.

The story itself is set just over 400 years before John Carter arrives on Mars. It begins during one of the apparently perennial wars between the twin cities of Helium. The battle is interrupted just as Dejah Thoris's family are about to finally defeat their enemies.

As an aside, the SPI boardgame company many years ago produced a boardgame based on Burroughs' `John Carter of Mars' stories. There was an `Unspeakable Acts' table. On which the female characters would roll a dice if captured by a villain, which would determined if she would commit suicide to avoid the unwanted attentions of her captor, or (if memory serves me) would use the dagger concealed about her person on the villain. The designer took the idea from the fact that Burroughs himself used the term `unspeakable acts' in these situations in his stories. I apologise for this aside, but seeing all the female flesh on display in the comic brought back the memory of the game.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No sex please, we're Martians, 4 Sep 2013
By 
No More Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
The story from the five issues of Dynamite Entertainment's comic book `Warlord of Mars - Dejah Thoris Volume 1: Colossus of Mars' is collected as Warlord of Mars: Dejah Thoris Volume 1 - The Colossus of Mars TP. It is a prequel to the graphic novel collection Warlord of Mars TP.

The art and scripting is of as reasonable standard for the story, which is basically wholesale slaughter of Martians by Martians in the tradition of Edgar Rice Burroughs' original stories. We have red Martians slaughtering red Martians, green Martians slaughtering red Martians, and Red/Green colossi slaughtering both red and Green Martians. We also have fathers killing sons (possibly accidentally) and sons shooting their fathers in the head for the last seat on the escape ship. They were both villains however. There are also many large female bosoms almost, but not quite, totally exposed to the reading public, whereas the men always keep their shorts on, even when hung up in the dungeons or being thrown to ravenous calots to be eaten alive. I wonder if the almost psychopathic slaughter of the Martians by each other is tied to sexual repression - one of the Martian leaders comments that "we have mandated strict procreation quotas in Zodanga", and another one observes that as the green Martians are breeding like rabbits, it is justifiable to exterminate them - though whether it is the Martians repression or the 19th century writer who created them, is open for discussion. It could just be the American comics' publishers' fear of prosecution for publishing comics with objectionable content, of which there have been many cases over the years - wholesale massacre is apparently not considered objectionable though. Anyway, it is all good clean fun, in the great American pulp tradition. I just find the artwork a bit too `cartoony', rather than being in the traditional American adventure comics' more naturalistic style.

The story itself is set just over 400 years before John Carter arrives on Mars. It begins during one of the apparently perennial wars between the twin cities of Helium. The battle is interrupted just as Dejah Thoris's family are about to finally defeat their enemies.

As an aside, the SPI boardgame company many years ago produced a boardgame based on Burroughs' `John Carter of Mars' stories. There was an `Unspeakable Acts' table. On which the female characters would roll a dice if captured by a villain, which would determined if she would commit suicide to avoid the unwanted attentions of her captor, or (if memory serves me) would use the dagger concealed about her person on the villain. The designer took the idea from the fact that Burroughs himself used the term `unspeakable acts' in these situations in his stories. I apologise for this aside, but seeing all the female flesh on display in the comic brought back the memory of the game.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No sex please, we're Martians, 4 Sep 2013
By 
No More Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
The story from the five issues of Dynamite Entertainment's comic book `Warlord of Mars - Dejah Thoris Volume 1: Colossus of Mars' is collected as Warlord of Mars: Dejah Thoris Volume 1 - The Colossus of Mars TP. It is a prequel to the graphic novel collection Warlord of Mars TP.

The art and scripting is of as reasonable standard for the story, which is basically wholesale slaughter of Martians by Martians in the tradition of Edgar Rice Burroughs' original stories. We have red Martians slaughtering red Martians, green Martians slaughtering red Martians, and Red/Green colossi slaughtering both red and Green Martians. We also have fathers killing sons (possibly accidentally) and sons shooting their fathers in the head for the last seat on the escape ship. They were both villains however. There are also many large female bosoms almost, but not quite, totally exposed to the reading public, whereas the men always keep their shorts on, even when hung up in the dungeons or being thrown to ravenous calots to be eaten alive. I wonder if the almost psychopathic slaughter of the Martians by each other is tied to sexual repression - one of the Martian leaders comments that "we have mandated strict procreation quotas in Zodanga", and another one observes that as the green Martians are breeding like rabbits, it is justifiable to exterminate them - though whether it is the Martians repression or the 19th century writer who created them, is open for discussion. It could just be the American comics' publishers' fear of prosecution for publishing comics with objectionable content, of which there have been many cases over the years - wholesale massacre is apparently not considered objectionable though. Anyway, it is all good clean fun, in the great American pulp tradition. I just find the artwork a bit too `cartoony', rather than being in the traditional American adventure comics' more naturalistic style.

The story itself is set just over 400 years before John Carter arrives on Mars. It begins during one of the apparently perennial wars between the twin cities of Helium. The battle is interrupted just as Dejah Thoris's family are about to finally defeat their enemies.

As an aside, the SPI boardgame company many years ago produced a boardgame based on Burroughs' `John Carter of Mars' stories. There was an `Unspeakable Acts' table. On which the female characters would roll a dice if captured by a villain, which would determined if she would commit suicide to avoid the unwanted attentions of her captor, or (if memory serves me) would use the dagger concealed about her person on the villain. The designer took the idea from the fact that Burroughs himself used the term `unspeakable acts' in these situations in his stories. I apologise for this aside, but seeing all the female flesh on display in the comic brought back the memory of the game.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No sex please, we're Martians, 23 May 2013
By 
No More Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Warlord Of Mars: Dejah Thoris Volume 1 - The Colossus Of Mars (Kindle Edition)
This is a collection of the five issues of Dynamite Entertainment's comic book `Warlord of Mars - Dejah Thoris Volume 1: Colossus of Mars'. It is a prequel to the graphic novel collection `Warlord of Mars'.
The art and scripting is of as reasonable standard for the story, which is basically wholesale slaughter of Martians by Martians in the tradition of Edgar Rice Burroughs' original stories. We have red Martians slaughtering red Martians, green Martians slaughtering red Martians, and Red/Green colossi slaughtering both red and Green Martians. We also have fathers killing sons (possibly accidentally) and sons shooting their fathers in the head for the last seat on the escape ship. They were both villains however. There are also many large female bosoms almost, but not quite, totally exposed to the reading public, whereas the men always keep their shorts on, even when hung up in the dungeons or being thrown to ravenous calots to be eaten alive. I wonder if the almost psychopathic slaughter of the Martians by each other is tied to sexual repression - one of the Martian leaders comments that "we have mandated strict procreation quotas in Zodanga", and another one observes that as the green Martians are breeding like rabbits, it is justifiable to exterminate them - though whether it is the Martians repression or the 19th century writer who created them, is open for discussion. It could just be the American comics' publishers' fear of prosecution for publishing comics with objectionable content, of which there have been many cases over the years - wholesale massacre is apparently not considered objectionable though. Anyway, it is all good clean fun, in the great American pulp tradition. I just find the artwork a bit too `cartoony', rather than being in the traditional American adventure comics' more naturalistic style.

The story itself is set just over 400 years before John Carter arrives on Mars. It begins during one of the apparently perennial wars between the twin cities of Helium. The battle is interrupted just as Dejah Thoris's family are about to finally defeat their enemies.

As an aside, the SPI boardgame company many years ago produced a boardgame based on Burroughs' `John Carter of Mars' stories. There was an `Unspeakable Acts' table. On which the female characters would roll a dice if captured by a villain, which would determined if she would commit suicide to avoid the unwanted attentions of her captor, or (if memory serves me) would use the dagger concealed about her person on the villain. The designer took the idea from the fact that Burroughs himself used the term `unspeakable acts' in these situations in his stories. I apologise for this aside, but seeing all the female flesh on display in the comic brought back the memory of the game.
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