Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Up to 70% off Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

168
4.1 out of 5 stars
The World is Not Enough [Blu-ray] [1999]
Format: Blu-rayChange
Price:£9.09+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Bond is required to protect a female oil magnate from potential assassination, but it soon becomes apparent that something far bigger and sinister is around the corner.

Pierce Brosnan returns for his third turn as super suave spy James Bond and all the crucial elements for the franchise are firmly in place. From the exhilarating pre-credit sequence down the river Thames to the glorious over the top explosive finale, this is a Bond film for those that enjoy the cheeky action led mania over thought and depth. Into the Bondian mix are the usual stalwarts; Judi Dench as M, Samantha Bond as Moneypenny, Desmond Llewelyn as Q {bidding a sad farewell to the franchise with a poignant moment} and Robbie Coltrane returns as Zukovsky. Bond girl duties fall to Sophie Marceau {beautiful and solid} and Denise Richards {sexy, elfin like, but out of her depth} and the psycho for hire role lands at the considerably fine feet of Robert Carlyle, even if the latter is badly underused.

The World Is Not Enough {the Bond family motto} is a whizz bang entry in the series and finds Brosnan well settled in the role; nailing the multitude of traits that make Bond a man that women want to bed and a man that men want to be. It is, however, in spite of its excellent action set pieces, rather shallow and all too aware of wanting to appease Bond fans across the spectrum. Thus the comedy moments come off as saggy and the more scientific aspects {as gloriously ridiculous as they are} feel more like auto-pilot plotting. Still, you get what you pay for with 90s Bond, so after the mixed Tomorrow Never Dies the makers were clearly intent on taking the fans on a ripper of a ride, and no doubt about it, they achieve that in spades. With the two hour running time just flying by. They of course would take it one step too far three years later with the nadir that was Die Another Day, thus making this the last good Bond film before Daniel Craig's fabulous re-invention arrived in 2006. 7/10
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
After the fun and entertaining `Goldeneye' and `Tomorrow Never Dies', this film sees Pierce Brosnan appearing for the third time as James Bond in the nineteenth big screen outing for the superspy. Sadly, this was to be Desmond Llewellyn's last appearance as Q.

After a wealthy industrialist is assassinated in MI6's headquarters, Bond is assigned to protect his daughter from the same fate. What follows in a tale of deceit and deception involving oil pipelines, psychopathic terrorists, nuclear submarines and caviar.

This, for me, was a bit of a drop in form for the classic Bond series. Brosnan is very good in the role and does his best with the material given to him to make Bond as believable and interesting a character as possible. But he is really up against it with the poor quality of the script and the bad direction. The plot makes little sense, and the script too full of bad jokes. The appearance of John Cleese as Q's replacement is silly and a particular low point. My biggest problem is the villain. Robert Carlyle, a great actor and one who could really make a classic sinister villain is wasted as the cartoonish super villain - impervious to pain and super strong - that we are presented with. It is just so over the top that the character loses any credibility, and hence there is no thrill of danger when Bond comes up against him.

That is not to say there are no good points - the action sequences, though a little silly when compared to previous films, are well directed and the big stunts impress. There is a top quality cast, including Carlyle, Judi Dench and Sophie Marceau giving it their all, and largely due to their talents it manages to entertain for about half the time.

An OK film. Not Bond's best, but not his worst. Three stars.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
After the fun and entertaining `Goldeneye' and `Tomorrow Never Dies', this film sees Pierce Brosnan appearing for the third time as James Bond in the nineteenth big screen outing for the superspy. Sadly, this was to be Desmond Llewellyn's last appearance as Q.

After a wealthy industrialist is assassinated in MI6's headquarters, Bond is assigned to protect his daughter from the same fate. What follows in a tale of deceit and deception involving oil pipelines, psychopathic terrorists, nuclear submarines and caviar.

This, for me, was a bit of a drop in form for the classic Bond series. Brosnan is very good in the role and does his best with the material given to him to make Bond as believable and interesting a character as possible. But he is really up against it with the poor quality of the script and the bad direction. The plot makes little sense, and the script too full of bad jokes. The appearance of John Cleese as Q's replacement is silly and a particular low point. My biggest problem is the villain. Robert Carlyle, a great actor and one who could really make a classic sinister villain is wasted as the cartoonish super villain - impervious to pain and super strong - that we are presented with. It is just so over the top that the character loses any credibility, and hence there is no thrill of danger when Bond comes up against him.

That is not to say there are no good points - the action sequences, though a little silly when compared to previous films, are well directed and the big stunts impress. There is a top quality cast, including Carlyle, Judi Dench and Sophie Marceau giving it their all, and largely due to their talents it manages to entertain for about half the time.

An OK film. Not Bond's best, but not his worst. Three stars.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
After the disappointment of Tomorrow Never Days, it perhaps shouldn't have been too surprising that, as per the usual EON pattern of alternating good and bad Bond films, The World is Not Enough turned out rather well. It helps that it has a stronger plot this time round as well as some attempt at an element of mystery - along with For Your Eyes Only this is the only Bond where the identity of the real villain is withheld for the first half of the movie. It's also more character-based than usual, with some interesting dialogue that takes on a different dimension once you know who's on the side of the angels and who isn't. The Maguffin is an oil-based variation on Goldfinger's big scheme, but the execution is very different and rather more grounded. Brosnan has the best character writing of his tenure but isn't always up to it: the moments of ruthlessness convince but he's one of those actors who can't stand still and just be and always has to do something, making him seem somewhat ADDS in some scenes and leads to a couple of strange bits of gurning. Yet it can still lay claim to being his best performance in the role, and the presence of Sophie Marceau and Robert Carlyle helps raise the acting bar enough so that even Denise Richards' hot pant wearing nuclear scientist - in-joke casting at its finest - isn't quite as bad as she's been painted.

There's a slightly schizoid feel to Michael Apted's direction at times seeming a tad uncertain and stylistically very different from Vic Armstrong's action scenes. It's certainly not difficult to tell who shot what, and not just because Armstrong seems better at hiding the significant height difference between Brosnan and Carlyle. While still variable (the opening boat chase has a few too many sight gags and the helicopter/chainsaw sequence doesn't work as well as it should), the action scenes are much better handled this time round and much better integrated into the story. Despite some awful wisecracks, this feels less like an attempt to hang plenty of setpieces on a flimsy plot and more like the action is being dictated by the story. Definitely one of the better modern Bond outings.

There's not much new in the two-disc Ultimate Edition to justify an upgrade though. While the extras from the previous release have been carried over, there's only a Hong Kong press conference and a few deleted and alternate scenes. Of these - including Renard's very unimpressive original entrance, more tomfoolery in Q's lab and a line about madmen in hollowed out volcanoes filled with large breasted women threatening the world with nuclear war ("It only takes one") among them - only a visually striking scene in the abandoned oilfields seems good enough to have kept.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 3 September 2010
This is one of my favourite Bond movies for a variety of reasons:
Bond is at perhaps his most revealing and complex in a long time, Brosnan playing him with a depth and nuance not usually seen. We get him pressing his luck with his affectionate but highly respectful relationship with Judi Dench's brilliant 'M'. We also get him showing vulnerability (and injury). And in the same film, in one astounding scene that's over in seconds, he somehow manages to convey loss, regret, devotion to country, and a real sense of Ian Fleming's 'assassin' all at the same time. A man who WILL kill for country. Not since Roger Moore's car-meets foot-meets cliff scene in 'For Your Eyes Only' has such surprising ruthlessness to meet his goal reared its head in a Bond movie, and it's hugely the better for it.
Judi Dench is given much to do in this adventure, which is welcome as her portrayal has a steely dignity and occasional softness that makes her highly watchable.
On the supporting character front, the film marks the swan song of Desmond Lewellyn's wonderful 'Q', and his exit is all the more poignant for a) being dignified, and interesting rather than emotional, and b) knowing that he passed away shortly afterwards.
John Cleese is humorous as his proposed replacement, but feels like little more than a well played buffoon role.
The film opens with a very lengthy pre-credit sequence, which is perhaps one of the best in the Bond series. As Bond brutally relieves corrupt Swiss bankers of their ill-gotten gains, the plot unexpectedly twists, and he eventually ends up in a spectacular speedboat chase on the Thames, which thunderously ends only to meet 'Garbage's nicely handled and memorable opening theme song.
The main villain in the film is played nicely by Robert Carlyle, as a lethal and fanatical anarchist of mysterious aims. His unique selling point? A bullet is lodged in his brain, the result of a botched assassination attempt, which has paradoxically rendered him unable to feel pain and made him even more cold-blooded and lethal - and it soon seems like he's after Sophie Marceau's Elektra King.
As a family friend and possible target, 'M' wants her protected. Marceau is gorgeously glamorous, and captivating viewing, her character granted a little more depth than usual - as indeed is almost everybody in the film. That is except for Denise Richards' ludicrous 'nuclear scientist' who spends most of the film in tight shorts and busty tops. Looking great but playing it as it's written, she seems to get the gag that she's the chesty girl who we're not really supposed to believe is a brainbox, and so she helps Brosnan milk the occasional comedy lines for all they're worth.
Carlyle is surprisingly deep and emotional as the conflicted and dangerous killer, and the set pieces are terrific. There are snowmobile-paraglider chases, ski-chases, a fantastic high-tension action piece in a nuclear bunker, the list goes on and on. But the best thing is the plot - taut, emotionally driven, and played to the hilt by better actors than would usually be lavished on an action film.
The setting, tension and drama of the finale are all perfectly handled as well.
An incredible package, made even more special by somehow perfectly snaring that old-fashioned feeling of daring, high danger and adventure that all the best old Bond films used to have. A true great in the series.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The World is Not Enough is directed by Michael Apted and adapted to screenplay by Neal Purvis, Robert Wade and Bruce Feirstein, using characters created by Ian Fleming. Music is scored by David Arnold and cinematography by Adrian Biddle.

Bond 19 and 007 is required to protect a female oil magnate from potential assassination, but it soon becomes apparent that something far bigger and sinister is around the corner.

Pierce Brosnan returns for his third turn as super suave secret agent James Bond and all the crucial elements for the franchise are firmly in place. From the exhilarating pre-credit sequence down the river Thames (14 minutes worth) to the glorious over the top explosive finale, this is a Bond film for those that enjoy the cheeky action led mania over thought and depth. Into the Bondian mix are the usual stalwarts; Judi Dench as M, Samantha Bond as Moneypenny, Desmond Llewelyn as Q (bidding a sad farewell to the franchise with a poignant moment) and Robbie Coltrane joyously returns as Zukovsky. Bond girl duties fall to Sophie Marceau (beautiful and solid) and Denise Richards (sexy, elfin like, but out of her depth) and the psycho for hire role lands at the considerably fine feet of Robert Carlyle, even if the latter is badly underused.

The World Is Not Enough (the Bond family motto) is a whizz bang entry in the series and finds Brosnan well settled in the role; nailing the multitude of traits that make Bond a man that women want to bed and a man that men want to be. Locales are lovely and interesting (Turkey, France, Spain, Azerbaijan), the plot carries some intelligence (with a decent mystery element for a change), characterisations are high end and Arnold's score is a safe accompaniment; as is the title song by Garbage. It is, however, all too aware of wanting to appease Bond fans across the spectrum. Thus the comedy moments come off as saggy and the more scientific aspects (as gloriously ridiculous as they are) feel more like auto-pilot plotting. Still, you get what you pay for with 90s Bond, and the action sequences are terrific. After the mixed Tomorrow Never Dies the makers were clearly intent on taking the fans on a ripper of a ride, and no doubt about it, they achieve that in spades; with the two hour running time just flying by.

Eon of course would take things one step too far three years later with the nadir that was Die Another Day, thus making this the last good Bond film before Daniel Craig's fabulous re-invention arrived in 2006. 7/10
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
After the disappointment of Tomorrow Never Days, it perhaps shouldn't have been too surprising that, as per the usual EON pattern of alternating good and bad Bond films, The World is Not Enough turned out rather well. It helps that it has a stronger plot this time round as well as some attempt at an element of mystery - along with For Your Eyes Only this is the only Bond where the identity of the real villain is withheld for the first half of the movie. It's also more character-based than usual, with some interesting dialogue that takes on a different dimension once you know who's on the side of the angels and who isn't. The Maguffin is an oil-based variation on Goldfinger's big scheme, but the execution is very different and rather more grounded. Brosnan has the best character writing of his tenure but isn't always up to it: the moments of ruthlessness convince but he's one of those actors who can't stand still and just be and always has to do something, making him seem somewhat ADDS in some scenes and leads to a couple of strange bits of gurning. Yet it can still lay claim to being his best performance in the role, and the presence of Sophie Marceau and Robert Carlyle helps raise the acting bar enough so that even Denise Richards' hot pant wearing nuclear scientist - in-joke casting at its finest - isn't quite as bad as she's been painted.

There's a slightly schizoid feel to Michael Apted's direction at times seeming a tad uncertain and stylistically very different from Vic Armstrong's action scenes. It's certainly not difficult to tell who shot what, and not just because Armstrong seems better at hiding the significant height difference between Brosnan and Carlyle. While still variable (the opening boat chase has a few too many sight gags and the helicopter/chainsaw sequence doesn't work as well as it should), the action scenes are much better handled this time round and much better integrated into the story. Despite some awful wisecracks, this feels less like an attempt to hang plenty of setpieces on a flimsy plot and more like the action is being dictated by the story. Definitely one of the better modern Bond outings.

There's not much new in the two-disc Ultimate Edition to justify an upgrade though. While the extras from the previous release have been carried over, there's only a Hong Kong press conference and a few deleted and alternate scenes. Of these - including Renard's very unimpressive original entrance, more tomfoolery in Q's lab and a line about madmen in hollowed out volcanoes filled with large breasted women threatening the world with nuclear war ("It only takes one") among them - only a visually striking scene in the abandoned oilfields seems good enough to have kept.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on 31 January 2010
'The World Is Not Enough' is arguably the best of the Brosnan era movies. Whereas 'Goldeneye' took an age to get going with limited action, and 'Tomorrow Never Dies' was a full on action assault, this film was a more balanced movie with plenty of action, lots of drama, good performances and complex storyline with a half decent twist.
By now Brosnan was in cruise control as Bond, having made the role his own, some critics going as far to say that he was the best. His performance here is beautifully understated as Bond struggles to keep his emotions and professionalism separate. The performances from the female cast are also a revelation as Sophie Marceau, Denise Richards and Judi Dench get much more material to play with and see plenty of action.
The movie moves along at a smooth pace and the action is evenly spread. The photography is also excellent. The whole picture oozes class.
Unfortunately the Blu Ray transfer doesn't do the film any justice at all. The ski chase sequence looks good, but that's about it. I expected the pre titles sequence to blow me away, but it's no better than the DVD in my opinion, which is a travesty. It's hard to explain, when you consider the DVD transfer of the first three Bond films, especially 'Golfinger' which looks and sounds fantastic. That a newer film like this looks and sounds so inferior is a real mystery.
I would seriously advise anyone thinking of 'upgrading' 'The World Is Not Enough' to Blu Ray to save their money and stick with the original DVD. I seriously think that some people are trying to con movie lovers and Blu Ray owners by giving us 'placebo effect' discs, that actually haven't been upgraded at all.
What a damn shame.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 14 October 2013
This is Brosnans third Bond film, when it first came out it left the world empty but now it start to grow. Probably the best Brosnan movie after Goldeneye but still has its flaws.

After fail to protect Mr King, James Bond gets a new assignment to protect his daughter Elektra King (Sophie Marceau), Elektra is now the heiress of a big oil company in Azerbaijan, during the investigation Bond find out the man who is after Elektra is a former KGB agent Renard (Robert Carlyle) who is now an assassin who feels no pain (latterly). Renard had a time ago kidnap Elektra to get Mr Kings ransom, but that failed and therefore go after Elektra for revenge. More and more investigation follows and Bond get a love interest to Elektra but after Bond confront Renard he find out that Renard is just a henchman and the real villain who is behind Mr Kings death is his own daughter Elektra.

In my opinion I think this is Peirce Brosnans best acting job as the 007 agent, he really nail his performance, and you can feel how he feels for Elektra weather he can trust her or not.

Sophie Marceau is in my opinion the most beautiful girl of all bond girls and great acting talent, she really put a sweet innocent tone when Bond think she is a good girl but when her cover is blown she become cold and ruthless and she perform both side majestically.

One small nit-pick is the hire Denise Richard as Dr Christmas Jones, she doesn't feel like a chemist Dr when she speaks her lines it doesn't match her body language or smile, but lets forgive her after all she was there as an eye candy.

Sadly our great Desmond Llewellyn who played Q in 17 Bond films died in a car accident, RIP Mr Llewellyn we will miss you.

Verdict? see it
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 31 October 2008
James Bond (Brosnan) is sent on a mission to protect the daughter of recently deceased Robert King and is soon finding clues to who was behind his murder.

After two impressive enthusiastic performances as Bond in Goldeneye and Tomorrow Never Dies, Pierce Brosnan added more drama to the character in this tense if slightly over-informed thriller.

Brosnan again cements the character to the ground with some delicious acting worthy of praise with cheeky puns and great onscreen relationships. The adding of the drama was a necessity to the character to create a more human feeling over that superhero cover he previously conveyed. The dramatic reflection on the plot is executed well by Brosnan and has only been bettered by Craig's recent reprisal of the British agent.

The actor is given great support by an exceptional performance by Sophie Marceau (Braveheart) as Electra King. Marceau is able to create a vulnerable character and create a sense of mystery about her, a sad sense of sophistication. She is easily the best Bond girl of the Brosnan era and is right up there with the best characters in the series.

Denise Richards (Starship Troopers) is disappointing in her role as Christmas Jones, a rather ordinary and plain character who seems just to be along for the ride. Unlike King's mysterious elegance, Jones just feels like an ordinary person caught up in an adventure and is there to just to make up numbers.

Two of Britain's finest actors are onscreen together after their famous partnership in hit TV series Cracker. Robbie Coltrane and Robert Carlyle are easily the most interesting actors to watch. Coltrane's Zukovsky adds humour to the plot where Carlyle creates the best Bond villain of the Brosnan era with a cold hearted character in Renard, a man with a bullet in his head. Carlyle adds that extra something to the narrative with a strong and dominant protagonist and is one of the main reasons to watch.

The opening to the 19th Bond is a very exciting affair with Bond chasing a villain in a speedboat with the then newly constructed Millennium Dome in the background. Fast and action packed with gadgets, this opening sequence will please audiences of any age who will simply smile when we see the straightening of the tie moment.

The plot balances the action well alongside the events of Elektra's pipeline business. The political agenda alongside the heavy use of character history is distracting and will have you scratching your head trying to recall the past but like other Bond films you don't need to know who is who and what is what as the action and intensity give the overall picture.

8/10
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Goldeneye [Blu-ray] [1995]
Goldeneye [Blu-ray] [1995] by Pierce Brosnan (Blu-ray - 2013)

Tomorrow Never Dies [Blu-ray] [1997]
Tomorrow Never Dies [Blu-ray] [1997] by Pierce Brosnan (Blu-ray - 2013)
£8.99

Die Another Day [Blu-ray] [2002]
Die Another Day [Blu-ray] [2002] by Pierce Brosnan (Blu-ray - 2013)
£8.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.