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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping post-apocalyptic tale
I was recommended this book by a friend, and must remember to thank him. This was a terrific read. Set in Britain after a terrifying virus has wiped out the global population, it follows a young man who has been fending for himself since the plague.

The author paints a compelling and disturbingly realistic picture of life for the lone survivor of a disaster. A...
Published 18 months ago by James Adamson

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Not my cup of tea
The story revolves around a young boy who lost his family and all that would keep you young person sane. Somehow he seems to have a very grown up attitude, well beyond his years. It is this element that just does not fit. His attitude is all wrong. The character needs to be older or some kind of genius. Still it's worth a read to make your own mind up.
Published 5 months ago by Mr. James Rutherford


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping post-apocalyptic tale, 20 Feb 2013
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This review is from: The Wanderer (Kindle Edition)
I was recommended this book by a friend, and must remember to thank him. This was a terrific read. Set in Britain after a terrifying virus has wiped out the global population, it follows a young man who has been fending for himself since the plague.

The author paints a compelling and disturbingly realistic picture of life for the lone survivor of a disaster. A lot of the story focuses on the daily struggle to survive and stay sane with no human interaction. The author makes what could have been too grim and oppressive a scenario actually very readable, thanks to an identifiable "boy next door" central character and some terrific detail to make the world of the story real. I could see and feel the changes to towns and the environment, and also enjoyed the idea that the hero will have read or seen many of the stories of the end of the world before it happened to him for real.

I ended up staying awake late into the night to finish the book, as the story built to a nicely-judged ending. I would recommend this to anyone who fancies something a bit different, or fans of this genre who want a fresh spin on the end of the world storyline.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An author to keep an eye on., 2 Feb 2013
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This review is from: The Wanderer (Kindle Edition)
David Anderson's The Wanderer is set in a post-apocalyptic world ravaged by a virus. Our protagonist was a boy when the virus hit and has been wandering alone in his home city ever since. I don't want to tell you too much about the plot (I hate spoilers!) so for now you will have to settle with that. At first glance my immediate thoughts were "not another post-apocalyptic story along the lines of Herbert's '48 or McCarthy's The Road." So it was with trepidation that I purchased Anderson's first attempt at a novel. How happy I was that I did.

Yes, the story might be as common as a rom-com these days but Anderson's tale feels fresh. His style is clear and free-flowing and allows the reader to be swept along. This is no mean feat considering that for the first half of the book there is no dialogue at all. The ominous landscape and wallowing existence of the protagonist are perfectly depicted. That said, it is in the second half of the book that the story truly takes off. Again, I will not tell you much (other than our protagonist doesn't remain alone) but trust me when I say that it has been a long time since I had encountered a book which refused to be put down (speaking metaphorically as it is an e-book!).

In truth, I am impressed. The horror genre has been inundated with paranormal romance as of late. I am happy to see that there are some out there who are trying valiantly to stem this tide of mediocrity and banality. Anderson's The Wanderer offers me hope. He is one to keep an eye on.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Desolation, despair, hope and humour., 17 Feb 2013
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This review is from: The Wanderer (Kindle Edition)
A very well written debut novel. The author manages to depict the landscape and characters well and kept them believable despite the subject matter. As a reader you are quite quickly drawn into the day to day life of 'The Boy' the main character.
As an author myself,I use dialogue as a tool to tell stories. The author didn't really have this luxury due to the nature of the story but managed to carry it off. Not an easy thing to do.
As this isn't a genre I would usually choose, I can't say how it compares but it is testament to the author that I looked forward to picking it up each day.
If he produces a follow up novel I will definitely buy it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very enjoyable read, 11 Feb 2013
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This review is from: The Wanderer (Kindle Edition)
Finished reading this book late last night, after being recommended through another website. I'm an easily distracted reader and there's not many books hold my attention enough to read large chunks in one sitting but this did.
I found it very easy to get into the mindset of the main character, and the description of his life he led and surroundings of his city easily helped me create the images of the deterioration in my mind, (I live in the city and could easily work out where the 'boy' was walking, even driving down the same streets after reading it allowed me to see certain landmarks).
I found myself willing him to make decisions, stay put, leave somewhere, and wanted to keep on reading.
Overall an enjoyable read, there's only a handful of books that I've been sad to reach the end as I'd wanted to keep on reading more and know about the character, but at the same time it ended well without having question marks over it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AN AMAZING DEBUT NOVEL, 20 Aug 2013
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This review is from: The Wanderer (Kindle Edition)
What an amazing debut novel by David Anderson. I have literally just finished this book and had to write a review. The wanderer is a story that follows a boy as he literally wanders through a dead city, after a virus has killed everyone...except him.

It starts 5 years after the apocalyptic event and through flashbacks and the boys own struggle, we learn what has happened as the book progresses. What I found most interesting about this book, is the fact that there is no mention of where the book is set, (there are clues scattered about) - there are no street names he walks down, and also we don't know his name...or his age, (again there is a clue further in the book as to his possible age). There is also something very clever about the way the author has written this main character - he has had no adult guidance in 5 years and so he's had no-one to `counsel' him on what is real and what is not - (this boy has a very active imagination and of course this has stayed with him throughout the years of his isolation). The way he `looks' at things and the way his imagination runs rampant, would have been tempered with a parents guidance...but of course his parents are dead, and so are all the adults - this makes the whole book take on a unique quality and the writing style is a pleasure to read.

Watch out for this author - if his future works compare to this novel, then he will be a force to be reckoned with.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very entertaining, 10 Feb 2013
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This review is from: The Wanderer (Kindle Edition)
Excellent piece of work from a new author. The plot concept is one that has a familiar feel (humanity all but wiped out by killer virus) but the author does a great job of keeping the narrative feeling original and compelling. Much of the early sections of the book are descriptive and with no dialogue, and instead focus on the realities of life during and after the plague. This makes for intriguing stuff and will keep the pages turning until a key plot development (no spoilers!) kicks things into a different gear. Very highly recommended and definitely worth a purchase to support a talented storyteller.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent post-apocalyptic novel, 10 Feb 2013
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This review is from: The Wanderer (Kindle Edition)
I have recently been getting into all things post-apocalyptic and this novel sounded like an interesting take on the idea so I grabbed it for my commutes to and from work.

This book is well written and definitely sets the bleak scene that any future world would be after a disaster. The right blend of short chapters and tension building descriptions mean that this is a hard book to put down as you "just want to read the next chapter to see what happens".

Based in the North East, the locations themselves add something unique to the genre that often focuses on large American cities, or if we Brits are lucky to get a mention, in London.

An impressive debut effort from an author who isn't afraid to make his characters as flawed as the rest of us, but it is by doing this that you are sucked into his world and feel for this character.

Recommended for anyone who is a fan of this genre.

NOTE: the author is also donating part of the money raised through book sales to a Cancer Charity, a worthy and fitting cause considering that the catastrophic event in this book is an uncontrollable disease.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very addictive book - didn't want to put it down, 4 Feb 2013
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This review is from: The Wanderer (Kindle Edition)
A very impressive and well constructed book from a debutant. I must admit, I do love reading but lately been far too busy to find the time. Once I purchased an iPad with the kindle app it was my perfect opportunity to get back in the 'reading' zone. I came across this book and the genre was right up my street. I was hooked from the word go and could find myself finding it difficult to put down. The book is very well written with short chapters that are extremely manageable and entertaining. This book really has it all - mystery, suspense and intrigue. You actually feel like you are with 'the wanderer' throughout his journey. The story includes two books that are cleverly written which come together brilliantly. Looking forward to many more books from David Anderson
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely brilliant! 99p is a bargain!, 13 April 2014
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This review is from: The Wanderer (Kindle Edition)
It's not an action book where the protagonist gets the girl and saves the world. Don't buy this book for the action, because it's not about that. Sure there IS action, but what this book does is focus on the story, the setting, the realism.

From real-world references (books, TV shows, celebrities etc) to the vision of a whispered apocalypse, this book paints an amazing portrait. If you're the kind of person who reads a book for the story, who can get so engrossed that they literally can't put the book down, then this will not disappoint.

Well worth 99p, I only wish there was a sequel because so much of what the characters did next remains unexplored.

I recommend this to anyone who wants a realistic reality of a post-apocalyptic world. It might lack radiation, mutants and other post-apocalyptic goodies, but it will not disappoint, not for a single second.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Enjoyable Post-Apocalyptic Yarn, 10 Jan 2014
This review is from: The Wanderer (Kindle Edition)
I never write reviews for the items I purchase, but felt compelled to do so after stumbling upon the unjustly critical and suspiciously detail-free one star review beneath this one. The Wanderer is certainly not a dire story and in no way deserves 'a minus star review' as stated below. Please note that, as I did not have a Kindle enabled reader at the time, this review is based off of the physical copy of the book available from lulu.com.

The story follows a young man who finds himself alone after an unstoppable disease seemingly wipes out the entire population of his country and possibly the world. In order to keep himself busy the unnamed protagonist wanders endlessly around his deserted city, scared to move on and using the familiarity as some sort of buffer against insanity. The first half of the book follows the main character for a couple of days and we learn all about the daily routines he uses to stave off madness. These scenes are cleverly broken up by flashbacks covering the initial outbreak of the disease and how it devastated the boy's country and, more importantly for the narrative, his family and one particular school friend. There are some touching and powerful scenes in this half of the book and the boy's pain and suffering are brought expertly to life by the author.

The first section of the book is unusual in the fact that not one spoken word is contained with its pages. This might make the first fifty percent of the book sound like a chore but it is not. The author covers this lack of speech by being very descriptive and, while this may put some people off, I thoroughly enjoyed the vivid landscapes of a decaying and empty Britain (although location is never actually confirmed) that his prose conjured. We are taken on tours of ramshackle buildings, bleak city centres and through nature gone back to wilderness.

At the halfway point of the novel an event occurs that will change the boy's life for ever. I won't reveal explicitly what happens as it is a huge spoiler, but it changes the pace and tone of the story for the second half of the book. Finally our protagonist breaks his five year silence and we begin to learn more about him as a person and hear about his memories and experiences from a more personal viewpoint. Eventually the boy is forced to leave the comfort of his familiar surroundings, and we embark on a road trip through a terrifyingly empty and dead country. On numerous occasions our protagonist finds himself in trouble and we are treated to a more fast-paced tale as the story leads to its bittersweet climax.

Other reviewers have mentioned that the book is essentially split into two contrasting approaches at the halfway point and I must agree that, after the big reveal at the midway point, the pace of the story changes. I, however, found that the two differing sections complemented each other really well. The first half helps build a realistic picture of the struggles and challenges of everyday life after a cataclysmic event and the second half is more reminiscent of The Road (a book the author himself explains in the afterword influenced him heavily). This second part of the book allows the author to introduce various new unsavoury elements that he was unable to explore previously. I can see why some people would prefer one section to the other but neither is poorly done. Whether you like slow and descriptive or fast-paced and exciting, The Wanderer will have you covered.

The Wanderer seems to be self-published and I know this can deter certain people from taking a chance on a book. A lot of self-published fiction can seem rushed and be littered with grammatical and spelling errors and the formatting can be a mess but I am happy to report that I didn't find any standout errors within the pages of this book. There has obviously been a lot of effort put in to ensure this book is presented as professionally and as error free as possible which is commendable.

As a massive fan of post-apocalyptic and zombie film and literature I can admit to really enjoying this book. While it might not be to everyone's tastes one hundred percent of the time, I feel there is enough here to keep any 'end of the world aficionado' happy. In my opinion it does not warrant the slating offered by the previous reviewer and I think the other reviews for this title only strengthen that. The book is currently for sale at 99p and I think there are a million and one worse ways to spend a pound. If you enjoyed The Road, I am Legend or similar post-apocalyptic fare, then it might worth you checking out David Anderson's The Wanderer.
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