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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A feast
I love Torey Hayden's books. I have read everything she has ever written and am hungry for more. Although the themes of her books are much of a muchness, every one of them comes across as fresh and new. She has a way of drawing you into her stories and making you feel a part of her experiences. As the parent of a special needs child myself (my son has...
Published on 3 Feb. 2006 by Ms. Sinnet A. Weber

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars okay
I did not enjoy this book as much as many other books I have read by Torey, it did not grip me as much as I had hoped it would.
Published 20 months ago by MCD


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A feast, 3 Feb. 2006
I love Torey Hayden's books. I have read everything she has ever written and am hungry for more. Although the themes of her books are much of a muchness, every one of them comes across as fresh and new. She has a way of drawing you into her stories and making you feel a part of her experiences. As the parent of a special needs child myself (my son has Asperger's Syndrome) I can empathise a lot with what she encounters. I just wish we could have had someone like her in our lives!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Sound of Silence, 16 Nov. 2005
By A Customer
The three people featured in this book have very disparate needs, yet all are bound by a common thread - silence in varying degrees. Cassandra, 9 was kidnapped by her father when she was 5. Two years after being kidnapped, she was found foraging in garbage cans outside of a small store. She was then returned to her mother, sisters and stepfather. Violent outbursts and erratic behavior led to her being admitted to an in-patient unit. While on the unit, Cassandra's behavior includes lying. She was also described as being able to identify others' weak spots and use them. Her behavior had reached such a critical point on the ward where she was spending much of her time in "lockdown" or seclusion, especially after she accused staff of molestation and harped on molestation themes to another child who had no known history of abuse. Efforts to separate Cassandra from the other child became part of her treatment, as did identifying feelings; naming the real abusers; defining boundaries and setting limits and helping her piece her memories together lead Cassandra to greater progress.
Gerda, 82 suffered from a stroke which affected her ability to speak. When she did speak, it was of her memories of living during the early 20th century; the loss of several siblings and the countryside as she remembered from her peripatetic travels in girlhood. Records from the local census bureau confirm her accounts; Gerda's progress is spurred even further by this additional interest.
Four-year-old Drake also has speech issues. Like Gerda, his condition was purely physical. A congenital vocal cord condition affected his ability to produce words and use his mouth muscles for activities such as blowing bubbles and licking ice cream. Popular in pre-school and described as having no behavioral issues, Drake travels with his ubiquitous toy tiger. After evaluating and observing Drake's progress in pre-school, it was decided that he be evaulated at the same hospital where Cassandra is a patient.
Unlike Cassandra, Drake is not described as presenting psychiatric issues and he seems to adapt to his surroundings. On one occasion, he gets to leave the hospital for an afternoon to visit Gerda, whose speech accelerates upon her delight at his visit. Gerda's accounts of her youth are especially touching and reading of this senior's progress alongside of two very young clients makes for a very pleasant bond indeed. Regardless of age, these people all shared the common thread of good humanity and the basic desire to communicate.
In time, Drake's medical condition is revealed, along with it family dynamics and well guarded secrets. In time, more walls are knocked down as Drake's family confronts the truth about his vocal condition. Learning sign language and being discharged from the hospital accelerates his progress and readers can take delight in the gains he and his family have made.
For these three clients, the sound of silence was broken.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FANTASTIC READ, 29 Aug. 2006
By 
J. WALKER (YORKSHIRE) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I do not agree with the last reviewer's rather harsh comments. Many of Torey Hayden's readers work in similar environments and respect the work she does.

Torey has had great success with all the children she has worked with and is very experienced in her field.

I have read most of the books by Torey Hayden with great interest and respect her choice to bring to the world's attention the suffering of abused children. It may be a disturbing read but no confidences are broken. Maybe it is Torey's individual and brave approach she takes towards the children which ensures her continued success as a therapist and an author.

I recommend this book and previous books by Torey to any reader and promise you once you start reading them you will want to read all her books.

RECOMMENDED
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Twilight Children by Torey Hayden, 13 Mar. 2007
By 
E. Dale "elained2" (W. Yorks, England UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
As usual the author keeps you gripped from page one as she tries to help the 3 different people in this book, from a little boy who it is finally found has problems causing his mutism to an old lady who remembers her childhood and her younger sister dying from eating opium which their mother had stored away...this book is unputdownable and highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AN EDUCATION FOR ME!, 20 Aug. 2006
By 
Heather Negahdar ""Haze"" (Bridgetown, Barbados) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
"I myself think of Gerda often, particularly when I am at home in Montana. Particularly when the chokecherries are in bloom."

Twilight Children was an education for me. Torey Hayden's true story was a page-turner, though I took longer to read it, unfamiliar with the kind of illness though quite different in all three of the patients.

Let's call Casandra, patient #1; whom Ms.Hayden experienced the most challenging time with. Casandra speaks when she wants to. She is a confused and disoriented child whose erratic behavioral patterns transcend upon her after being kidnapped by her father.

#2 patient is Drake, a very adorable and loving child who never speaks to anyone with the exception of his mother. He plays with the other children and is wiling to be around them cooperating and having a joyous time, but he never speaks. What could be wrong there, and is his obnoxious grandfather at the source of the handicap?

The patient #3 is Gerda who is of a different age group. Gerda is eighty and has suffered a stroke. Since then she has not spoken. We imagine that her speechlessness is not because of the stroke, but rather because of the latter part of her life in Philadelphia, where she bottles up her emotions and is left alone, her only companions being her beloved cats. It was very educational for me and I highly recommend this book. Ms. Hayden has also written more books about children struggling with

psychological matters.

Reviewed by Heather Marshall Negahdar (SUGAR-CANE 20/08/06)
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Sound of Silence - Resounding Silence, 8 Nov. 2005
By A Customer
The three people featured in this book have very disparate needs, yet all are bound by a common thread - silence in varying degrees. Cassandra, 9 was kidnapped by her father when she was 5. Two years after being kidnapped, she was found foraging in garbage cans outside of a small store. She was then returned to her mother, sisters and stepfather. Violent outbursts and erratic behavior led to her being admitted to an in-patient unit. While on the unit, Cassandra's behavior includes lying. She was also described as being able to identify others' weak spots and use them. Her behavior had reached such a critical point on the ward where she was spending much of her time in "lockdown" or seclusion, especially after she accused staff of sexual molestation and harped on molestation themes to another child who had no known history of sexual abuse. Efforts to separate Cassandra from the other child became part of her treatment, as did identifying feelings; naming the real abusers; defining boundaries and setting limits and helping her piece her memories together lead Cassandra to greater progress.

Gerda, 82 suffered from a stroke which affected her ability to speak. When she did speak, it was of her memories of living during the early 20th century; the loss of several siblings and the countryside as she remembered from her peripatetic travels in girlhood. Records from the local census bureau confirm her accounts; Gerda's progress is spurred even further by this additional interest.

Four-year-old Drake also has speech issues. Like Gerda, his condition was purely physical. A congenital vocal cord condition affected his ability to produce words and use his mouth muscles for activities such as blowing bubbles and licking ice cream. Popular in pre-school and described as having no behavioral issues, Drake travels with his ubiquitous toy tiger. After evaluating and observing Drake's progress in pre-school, it was decided that he be evaulated at the same hospital where Cassandra is a patient.

Unlike Cassandra, Drake is not described as presenting psychiatric issues and he seems to adapt to his surroundings. On one occasion, he gets to leave the hospital for an afternoon to visit Gerda, whose speech accelerates upon her delight at his visit. Gerda's accounts of her youth are especially touching and reading of this senior's progress alongside of two very young clients makes for a very pleasant bond indeed. Regardless of age, these people all shared the common thread of good humanity and the basic desire to communicate.

In time, Drake's medical condition is revealed, along with it family dynamics and well guarded secrets. In time, more walls are knocked down as Drake's family confronts the truth about his vocal condition. Learning sign language and being discharged from the hospital accelerates his progress and readers can take delight in the gains he and his family have made.

For these three clients, the sound of silence was broken.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Twilight Children, 5 Jan. 2006
I have just finished reading this book and was as equalled engrossed in it as I was with One Child and Tiger's Child.
Truly remarkable read and am now about to purchase my next one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Amazing Read, 18 April 2007
This is the first Torey book I have read. It is well written and gives a very good insight to how she has worked with these three individuals to make their lives better and more fulfilling. The book keeps your interest and takes you on a very emotional and dramatic journey. Her patience and commitment to the individuals and families she works with is quite is examplary and occasionally detrimental to her own personal life. She is a very dedicated and fascinating lady who truly loves her work.

After completing the book I was compelled to buying more of her work as she sounds quite an amazing and talented individual. I am looking forward to reading more of her case studies.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sound of Silence, 17 Dec. 2005
By A Customer
The three people featured in this book have very disparate needs, yet all are bound by a common thread - silence in varying degrees. Cassandra, 9 was kidnapped by her father when she was 5. Two years after being kidnapped, she was found foraging in garbage cans outside of a small store. She was then returned to her mother, sisters and stepfather. Violent outbursts and erratic behavior led to her being admitted to an in-patient unit. While on the unit, Cassandra's behavior includes lying. She was also described as being able to identify others' weak spots and use them. Her behavior had reached such a critical point on the ward where she was spending much of her time in "lockdown" or seclusion, especially after she accused staff of molestation and harped on molestation themes to another child who had no known history of abuse. Efforts to separate Cassandra from the other child became part of her treatment, as did identifying feelings; naming the real abusers; defining boundaries and setting limits and helping her piece her memories together lead Cassandra to greater progress.
Gerda, 82 suffered from a stroke which affected her ability to speak. When she did speak, it was of her memories of living during the early 20th century; the loss of several siblings and the countryside as she remembered from her peripatetic travels in girlhood. Records from the local census bureau confirm her accounts; Gerda's progress is spurred even further by this additional interest.
Four-year-old Drake also has speech issues. Like Gerda, his condition was purely physical. A congenital vocal cord condition affected his ability to produce words and use his mouth muscles for activities such as blowing bubbles and licking ice cream. Popular in pre-school and described as having no behavioral issues, Drake travels with his ubiquitous toy tiger. After evaluating and observing Drake's progress in pre-school, it was decided that he be evaulated at the same hospital where Cassandra is a patient.
Unlike Cassandra, Drake is not described as presenting psychiatric issues and he seems to adapt to his surroundings. On one occasion, he gets to leave the hospital for an afternoon to visit Gerda, whose speech accelerates upon her delight at his visit. Gerda's accounts of her youth are especially touching and reading of this senior's progress alongside of two very young clients makes for a very pleasant bond indeed. Regardless of age, these people all shared the common thread of good humanity and the basic desire to communicate.
In time, Drake's medical condition is revealed, along with it family dynamics and well guarded secrets. In time, more walls are knocked down as Drake's family confronts the truth about his vocal condition. Learning sign language and being discharged from the hospital accelerates his progress and readers can take delight in the gains he and his family have made.
For these three clients, the sound of silence was broken.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sound of Silence, 17 Dec. 2005
By A Customer
The three people featured in this book have very disparate needs, yet all are bound by a common thread - silence in varying degrees. Cassandra, 9 was kidnapped by her father when she was 5. Two years after being kidnapped, she was found foraging in garbage cans outside of a small store. She was then returned to her mother, sisters and stepfather. Violent outbursts and erratic behavior led to her being admitted to an in-patient unit. While on the unit, Cassandra's behavior includes lying. She was also described as being able to identify others' weak spots and use them. Her behavior had reached such a critical point on the ward where she was spending much of her time in "lockdown" or seclusion, especially after she accused staff of molestation and harped on molestation themes to another child who had no known history of abuse. Efforts to separate Cassandra from the other child became part of her treatment, as did identifying feelings; naming the real abusers; defining boundaries and setting limits and helping her piece her memories together lead Cassandra to greater progress.
Gerda, 82 suffered from a stroke which affected her ability to speak. When she did speak, it was of her memories of living during the early 20th century; the loss of several siblings and the countryside as she remembered from her peripatetic travels in girlhood. Records from the local census bureau confirm her accounts; Gerda's progress is spurred even further by this additional interest.
Four-year-old Drake also has speech issues. Like Gerda, his condition was purely physical. A congenital vocal cord condition affected his ability to produce words and use his mouth muscles for activities such as blowing bubbles and licking ice cream. Popular in pre-school and described as having no behavioral issues, Drake travels with his ubiquitous toy tiger. After evaluating and observing Drake's progress in pre-school, it was decided that he be evaulated at the same hospital where Cassandra is a patient.
Unlike Cassandra, Drake is not described as presenting psychiatric issues and he seems to adapt to his surroundings. On one occasion, he gets to leave the hospital for an afternoon to visit Gerda, whose speech accelerates upon her delight at his visit. Gerda's accounts of her youth are especially touching and reading of this senior's progress alongside of two very young clients makes for a very pleasant bond indeed. Regardless of age, these people all shared the common thread of good humanity and the basic desire to communicate.
In time, Drake's medical condition is revealed, along with it family dynamics and well guarded secrets. In time, more walls are knocked down as Drake's family confronts the truth about his vocal condition. Learning sign language and being discharged from the hospital accelerates his progress and readers can take delight in the gains he and his family have made.
For these three clients, the sound of silence was broken
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