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140 of 148 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unique, incredible, momentous...and difficult
So much has been written about this book in the past eighty years that its reputation alone is enough to dissuade some readers. I think that the reviews printed here reflect the balance of opinion about it, both why it is so revered and why some describe it as being unreadable. For what it is worth, 'Ulysses' is, for me, one of the most sublime monuments in world...
Published on 27 July 2004 by Depressaholic

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106 of 119 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars It helps to remember that Joyce was a fan of Fantomas
People approaching Ulysses for the first time should be aware that this particular edition, the so-called "Corrected Text" is a strange beast, created as the work was approaching the end of its term of copyright to ensure that a new copyright could be created and thus control be maintained over the cash flow from the book well into the 21st century. To this end, the text...
Published on 9 Sep 2009 by Quackser


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140 of 148 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unique, incredible, momentous...and difficult, 27 July 2004
So much has been written about this book in the past eighty years that its reputation alone is enough to dissuade some readers. I think that the reviews printed here reflect the balance of opinion about it, both why it is so revered and why some describe it as being unreadable. For what it is worth, 'Ulysses' is, for me, one of the most sublime monuments in world literature, a book unlike any other, and one that deserves a place among the very small number of classics that should be enjoyed for centuries to come. However, I do understand those that have struggled and failed with it.
Firstly, to like this book is not 'pretentious'. It is perhaps my pretension that made me read it and want to understand it to begin with, but certainly not my pretension that made me enjoy it. These are not to be confused. Secondly, it is 'difficult'. If someone tells you otherwise, I would like to know what they are comparing it to. Joyce's language is convoluted and obscure, and often important events are referred to so obliquely that they bypassed me if my attention was wandering. I have read the book twice and realised that I missed much the first time round. However, the rewards for sticking with it are huge. Thirdly, don't let the scholarly dissection of the book put you off. There are a lot of themes underpinning the book, not least the explicit parallels with the 'Odyssey' and the slightly more implicit theme of the relationships between fathers and sons (paralleled by a reference to Hamlet that runs through the book). However, it would be wrong to view 'Ulysses' as some sort of puzzle to be solved. It is, very simply, a book about a man (Bloom/Daedalus/Joyce) and about Ireland in 1904. For all its scholarly overtones it is about a day in the life of an everyman. He isn't a hero, he doesn't save the world or fight the bad guy and, paradoxically, this should make it more, not less, accessible to most readers. If you are able to overcome the complex structure (which becomes one of the book's joys, honest) and lack of plot then the odyssey through a single day and a single language, and a single city becomes the most incredible journey in literature. I have read it twice, and both times I was unable to out the book out of my head for several days after I had out it down. It felt more like having an important life moment than simply reading a book. I read a lot, but only a couple of books make me feel this way, and this is one. If this (admittedly pretentious sounding) review doesn't put you off, then please make the effort to read this book. It really is worth it.
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92 of 99 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read Ulysses for fun? Are you mad? Er, well no actually, 1 Jun 1999
By A Customer
Nearly everybody knows about Joyce's extravagant depiction of one day in early 20th century Dublin, and almost nobody has actually read it (unless forced to do so at school).
The length of the book, the legendary "difficulty" of the English, even the lack of punctuation, all serve to make most potential readers queasy. This perception is enhanced by the enormous volume of secondary writing on the book and Joyce himself. Everything about the text seems to be a license for academics to be pretentious and superiour. Read Ulysses for pleasure? Are you mad? Have you been down the pub with Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus?
As far as I am aware, I am neither mad nor drunk, but I do recommend holding one's literary breath and plunging into this masterpiece.
This book is truly an extraordinary novel. Joyce is a master at depicting and analysing mankind. His ability to describe human emotions on both a concious and sub-concious level is amazing. I am not saying it is easy. To be honest, there are large parts of the book that even after re-reading are way over my head, but too many believe that the book is beyond them. One should not focus on the bad, but the good, and the overall effect of the novel is nothing short of awesome.
So go on, ignore the stigma and the prejudice.
Read Ulysses, for fun.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's a Classic, 1 Mar 2012
I have been through a few Kindle versions of Ulysees now but have given up on each after a chapter or so due to poor formatting or missing/jumbled text. I was about to give up on counting it in my library until I saw this version and for the sake of a quid - thought I'd give it a try. And I'm pleased I did. It is presented perfectly and if you are going to attempt this goliath of a book on your Kindle then you'd be hard-pushed to find a more readable version. It comes with some decent original photos too - but more importantly, it is true to the print version and set out as it should be for Kindle - with menus that actually work and page breaks where they should be. Everyone should at least try to read Ulysees in their lifetime - give it a go!
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106 of 119 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars It helps to remember that Joyce was a fan of Fantomas, 9 Sep 2009
People approaching Ulysses for the first time should be aware that this particular edition, the so-called "Corrected Text" is a strange beast, created as the work was approaching the end of its term of copyright to ensure that a new copyright could be created and thus control be maintained over the cash flow from the book well into the 21st century. To this end, the text needed to be significantly different to the previous "version". So up stepped Hans Walter Gabler, ready and willing to make sometimes dozens of alterations to the text on each page, "correcting" colloquial speech and making numerous other changes based upon what he has decided the author's intentions actually were.

People who wear their half-moon glasses on a little chain around their neck have been arguing about just what the "definitive" text of Ulysses might be for years, and there's no doubt that Gabler has made all of his "improvements" out of love for the material- or at least from an ambition to be pre-eminent in the notoriously and ridiculously ingrown world of Joyce studies- but it's hard to escape the conclusion that what he has done here is essentially, well, dry-humped the book.

The conceit of all this would make a fine comedy, full of the kinds of jokes that academics don't get. Joyce himself perhaps wouldn't have appreciated the humour in the idea of a bunch of idiots rewriting his book with a big payday in mind, all the while fooling themselves that they're doing it for the sake of the book. But Flann O'Brien might have.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars No Notes?!, 4 Mar 2010
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I recently read Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Wordsworth Classics)and was very impressed with the notes. I found they gave just enough information to help me understand the text, but not enough to interrupt the flow of reading. I can't imagine a better version for the everyday reader. I have had similar experiences with many other novels that Wordsworth publish.

Ulysses is probably more in need of notes than any other novel, so I thought, "Wordsworth are bound to have their usual nice notes...", when I ordered it. Imagine my disappointment when I found they provided no notes at all! I'd held off buying another version with notes until this was published because I like the Wordsworth price & font. But, for Ulysses, notes are by far the most essential attribute!

I will now have to buy either Ulysses: The 1922 text (Oxford World's Classics) or Ulysses (Penguin Modern Classics). These are the only versions I know of that have notes. They also have 'look inside' enabled. I recommend that anyone start reading at page 1 in 'look inside' and see which one has the most helpful notes for them. Try and see them in a bookshop or library if you can, so you can judge their physical layout -- Oxford use a small print size, which I can just about manage, but it's definitely a negative.

The average reader (i.e., readers like me!) will need to access the notes several times before page 2, so it should soon become obvious which is most helpful version for you... if you are average...

Update: Do you know what ouns (mentioned on page 1) are? Neither do I. Penguin's supposedly annotated edition doesn't bother to tell you, Oxford does. And it's a lot less expensive! I think my buying decision is made... see my (upcoming!) review of the Oxford edition to see if it holds up to more detailed scrutiny.
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51 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Twenty years after, 2 Feb 2003
By A Customer
I'm just completing a re-reading of Ulysses twenty years after reading it as a student, and I'm amazed at how much I'm enjoying it. Yes, it's difficult and packed with allusions to literature, religion and philosophy that I've no idea about. But the sheer poetry of the writing, the humour and the inclusive passion for experience and existence, thought and emotion, have carried me over the difficult passages. 80 years after it was written there's still nothing to compare with Ulysses in its daring, scope and formal experimentation. If you want to understand the modern novel at all, start here.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cursed it. Loved it., 11 July 2014
By 
Eric Cornel (Tilburg, The Netherlands) - See all my reviews
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Reading Ulysses is an experience, an odyssey if you like.
It is the heroic tale stripped bare from any misguiding suggestion of glory. In Ulysses life is not glorious, it's trivial. Should there be anything close to heroism, look for it in the muddy context of ordinarity. For heroic deeds emerge from everyday life.

Like Nietzsche dismantled the existence of a living God, and encourages us to confront the seeming horror of His death in order to set ourselves free, Joyce in Ulysses fillets our delusional hope for The Exceptional. Whether struggling with Olympians, searching for a Holy Grail or just out on the town for the length of one day, we all think our silly, disturbing, unrelated thoughts. We can be generous, compassionate, involved and inspired. And we know violence, prejudice, narcissism, envy and a whole range of petty egotistical and shortminded sensations from within; we all need to relieve ourselves in more than one way and we all just go on with whatever it is we were doing once we were finished. Joyce is the first to wonder why all the trivialities were left out from the stories of old. How can anyone ever really relate to a hero lacking the most primal human idiosyncracies, let alone live up to his standards?

I noticed that a lot of people who've read it encourage us to read Ulysses as a sort of literary comedy. I disagree with that. Yes, it can be quirky, it has wit, irony and sarcasm, funny, creative wordplay and it is not hard to find something to smile about on every page if that's what you're looking for (just looking at yourself struggling to make sense of it all should crack you up), but in it's core this is a profound book about compassion and love for mankind. With all its flaws. If that's too raw for you, if you are not prepared to let go of the Heroic Dream that our tradition has carefully been constructing ever since the tale of Gilgamesh up to his modern day equivalents, the idols of popular culture, than Ulysses can't be anything but obscene.

With that regard I see a straight line from James Joyce to the rogue story tellers of our time. These days (anti-)heroes are perpetually encountering the trivialities of life, be it Woody Allens constant neurotic babble and a (poorly masked) libido or the insignificant fascinations of Quentin Tarantino's tough guys that live in front of a backdrop of branding and advertising.

I'm not going to say this is my favourite book. There were times that I've cursed it. But I did love living in it. Sometimes it was torture, and I felt so lost. But: to read Ulysses is to study Ulysses. I combined reading the Everyman's edition with a dutch translation and also kept the internet at hand. I had to take heed not to get lost in the labyrinth of annotations and hold course. But I also wanted to make sure not to miss out on too much of the subtext. Navigating between Scylla and Charibdis indeed! Exploring footnotes and episode reviews enhanced my experience and helped me to catch my breath when necessary. Reading Ulysses is really like being out on your own, caught in a literary variation of Odysseus travels. Like your fellow exile, you will find yourself seriously considering to give in or give up, telling yourself you're probably too stupid to pull this off or coming up with a thousand better reasons to spend your precious time. These are the temptations you're dealing with on the quest you've embarked on: sirens calling out to you from every corner to keep you from finding your way home and bringing in your ship. But when in doubt, always remember: if a two-dimensional hero can do it, why not you? And lo, there is joy, waiting at the close!

To Leopold Bloom, to Molly and Stephen and to early 20th century Dublin: I'll be missing you terribly...
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49 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Is it worth it?, 13 Oct 2002
By 
J. Skade "joeskade" (London, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This is the most important question for those who have yet to dip their toes in this 'difficult classic' - they may have read 'Dubliners' or 'A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man' but find 'Ulysses' daunting.
Well, yes - it is worth the trouble, and the trouble may be less than you think and the effort more fun than you imagined. This book is very funny and very beautiful.
The book concerns a day in the life of Stephen Dedalus young would be writer and Leopold Bloom middle aged advertising space salesman, with the final chapter being given to the nocturnal thoughts of Bloom's unfaithful wife,Molly. During the day Bloom attends a funeral, faces down a racist bigot, masturbates and saves a drunken Stephen from two British soldiers before taking him home. The books famed mythic parallels, it's symbolism, puzzles, allusions etc are all very well when one has made some headway into the book - and it is a book one goes back to, but the nervous reader is more concerned with its difficulty.
The simple answer is not to get too bogged down when one does not understand something. Skip with impunity. Do not give up stumped at chapter three - we've all been there and it is worth pressing on. The difficulty lies partly with Joyce's 'internal monologue' technique particularly when the thoughts being set down in this abbreviated form are those of the erudite (and pretentious) Stephen - and partly (especially in the second half of the book) with the plethora of styles Joyce uses to mirror the action of the book - parody, pastiche and musical and rhythmic devices. Yet in these styles lie so many of the book's joys - one is again and again stopped in one's tracks by a perfectly shaped sentence ,a piece of intriguing wordplay or a sly shaft of wit.
If you persevere with this book you will find your own reasons for going back to it. This book in a very strange and subtle way, is a lifechanger.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The greatest of them all., 10 Jun 1997
By A Customer
An independent discovery of self and matter rarely comes in such obtuse and atmospheric prose as Ulysses does. The most spinalcrushingly dense text this side of the Marquis De Sade and Rabelais, Joyce evolves the subconscious greatness of Bloom by using thousands of references from 20th Century Industrial Europe and weaving them into million mile high levels of plot and thought. Joyce carries subtlety and grace with each poetic sentence and each step of character development; you don't just read, you experience, you live within this world. Immerse yourself in the essence that is Ulysses, whether your teacher assigns it to you or not.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Greatest Book Hangover, 22 Feb 2013
Don't read this book. Not because it's bad. Far from it. Don't read it because it is far, far too good. If you want every book you read afterwards to seem multidimensional and stimulating, don't read this book. If you want everything in your life to seem highly complex and detailed, don't read this book. Because after you've finished it, your life will not be the same. Seriously, I'm not joking. The hangover from this book has permeated my entire life and utterly changed the way I think about everything. It is electricity set in motion by words.
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