Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 23 June 2008
Alastair's first book was great: ordinary Yorkshire lad toughens up in the crucible of Africa and triumphs. In his second and much better book, Alastair pushes himself even harder and becomes a Nietzschean superman, riding the Road of Bones in Siberia in winter in temperatures of minus 40 degrees. It's quite incredible how tough a man can become and still remain human, literate and sensitive, as Alastair does.

This book has it all, it's a great travel read, a look into the human soul and how most people, given enough determination, could attempt something like this and grow massively in the process. For bikers, it's something special, as he has some great insights and tips for world bike touring and camping. Of all the world cycling books, this one is most relevant and useful for anyone thinking of or planning an adventure like this.
0Comment| 40 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 August 2009
I have read an awful lot of books about people making big long bike trips, and in my view this one is the best of the lot. It charts the second half of Alasdair Humphreys' round the world cycle trip and is a continuation of his first book, Moods of future joys. In this book he travels by boat from Cape town to Rio, and then by bus to very southern tip of the Americas. From there he cycles up the west coast of south America through to Columbia, where he then hops on a boat for a while, before continuing by bicycle up through the western seaboard of the States and Canada. Another boat trip, Alaska and he reaches the top of the Americas. All that in 161 pages. There is adventure, humour, thrills and spills throughout. Sometimes he cycles alone, sometimes with others, sometimes naked. The momentum never stops. This is so much more than a travelog. But if that wasnt enough he then gets another boat, crosses the icy depths of Siberia, Japan, China, the `stans' and back through Europe. The second half if anything is better than the first. I don't know if he was a writer before he set out, but he certainly was one by the time he got back. This is so much more than a story about a bloke from yorkshire on a bike. It is a journey of self discovery that you can share and learn from. Inspiring and entertaining at the same time.
0Comment| 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 June 2008
Enjoyed the first book. Good that this follows on (although it stands alone as a book - you don't have to have read the first volume). It is easy to care for the writer, so its nice to find out what happened to him next.

Once again there is expression of emotion, confidence, doubt etc which is so much better than the boring travelogs of some, who mistakenly think just listing places visited is a story. I hope to read more from this author in the future.
0Comment| 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 January 2009
I'd say this is a must read book for the simple fact that it goes against the grain - no massive back up, expensive equipment or 'fastest, strongest, quickest' just a brilliant understated story. Buy it now!
0Comment| 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 June 2008
I bought Alastair's first book and thought it was very good but this book is even better. I read it once then my Japanese partner took it back to Japan so I bought a second copy for myself and am reading it again. It is by far the best book about a cycling trip that has been written in my view and I've read and enjoyed most of Josie Dew's books and Anne Mustoe's books.
My two sons are about Alastair's age so I have bought them each a copy for their birthdays - I believe they will be inspired by it.
That's 4 copies!!! Well worth buying. I'm looking forward to Alastair's talk next week.
Mike Newton
0Comment| 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 January 2009
This book continues on from "Moods of Future Joys". I loved both books (read my review for the first book). Also, every person I have borrowed these books to, regardless of whether or not they were outdoorsy, adventurous or sporty themselves, loved them too!

If you want a pair of books to get you motivated to help achieve some of those big goals in your life, I'd thoroughly recommend "Moods of Future Joys" and "Thunder and Sunshine".
0Comment| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 March 2014
Alistair's first book which took him from home, down through Africa was good. He is an honest down to earth author who tells it as it is. The good and the bad. This is something I like about him.

This book took him from where he left off in the first book, in Cape town to the lowest tip of the America's, up to Alaska, Siberia and home to the UK. What a journey. He describes the people, towns, countryside, conditions, dangers, weather together with his feelings, his hopes, fears and determination as we travel though the pages with him. It seems we are there with him from the heat to the freeze from the tears to the relief and the laughter.

He endured so much there were times when I wanted him to extend one part and not skip the next few days/weeks or even countries but he has had to condense a journey of many years into two volumes. I just didn't want the book to end.

This is a book to take with you when you are on a ride. If it is bad for you, Alistair has endured more and it has helped make him the man is now is. He has the ant philosophy - never give up.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 December 2013
If i thought Etheopia was tough it was childs play compared to siberia. At least if alastair could survive Siberia then things like ,bankruptcy,rudeness, robbery, homelessness starvation,mental and physical abuse,bullying,broken bones,loneliness would seem like a piece of cake.
Okay i have had a couple of near death experiences myself and yes i do feel those experieces have toughened me up. But just think of alastair who must have had thousands of near death experiences during his four years of cycling round the world. And it was not just the cycling but the low budget camping and eating that was so remarkable.
Well done alastair! This is a very well written book and an inspiation to all who read it
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 June 2013
2nd part of Alastair's book telling of his journey around the world. I really enjoyed this, however if travelogues are not your thing then don't bother. If you have read and enjoyed Mark Beaumont's books you will enjoy both of these. I'd recommend both volumes.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 February 2014
I like riding my bike, I like reading about others riding theirs, particularly in far away lands. This book is the perfect balance of everything that is right with a cycle touring book. Pictures are painted in the mind of far away places, struggles are shared and emotions are empathised. I have read Rob Lilwall's "Cycling Home From Siberia" in which he rides through Siberia and Japan with Alastair and both journeys read completely differently. The only downside is that I've finished it. You will not be disappointed.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)